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Electrical_Sky7291

Circular saw for the outside cuts and then one or two more passes with the circular saw, chunk the slices out with a chisel and then if you need perfect lines and depth then clean up with the router.


lint20342

Make sure you have a straight guide for both router and circ saw. And take shallow and small passes with the router. it takes up more time, but palm router isn’t really intended for hogging out a material like that


Rocketman_1981

This ⬆️


AgedP

The circular saw can also do the clean up, if you have guides in place on both sides. Matthias Wandel demonstrates it (in a cross cut dado situation) here: https://www.youtube.com/shorts/nz6jF-GsRqk


rancidperiodblood

I’m gonna recommend that you go buy some more tools, this isn’t even ryobi hate, you got too much material to remove, you should get (buy, rent, or borrow) a table saw or a corded router, i love cordless tools, but removing that much material going with the grain, you should be using 120 volts of continuous, uninterrupted power


mire_poix86

Yeah that would be alot of passes with the router


kjmcclellan

Stacked dado blade on a table saw.


Tha_Unknown

Found the American.


DankPePe427

Do people outside the US not use dados?


strangescript

They are actually illegal in some countries


DankPePe427

Wild. There's my learner's fact of the day. Dados scare me 100% less than shapers. Which I assume is the tool of choice for cutting dados when you can't use a dado set?


a_natural_chemical

wait, what?? why?


Tha_Unknown

I’m not up on all laws and regs all over the world but I know they are illegal in the UK. This is because you can’t use a riving knife while the stack is in place. The table saws over there have a smaller arbor to prevent you from even trying.


AgedP

I've also heard it relates to table saws that stop with a brake instead of slowing down gradually. The weight of a dado stack threatens to loosen the arbor nut.


Tha_Unknown

You’re supposed to check your nuts frequently any way.


donk202020

Don’t know if it’s illegal in Australia but same re the small arbor on the saws to prevent even trying


Tha_Unknown

Would make sense as Australia is owned by Europe and never allowed to have fun.


arisoverrated

Not on a circular saw, in my experience. Will circular saws even accommodate the thickness of a dado stack? I’ve never seen a circular saw that can make a 1-inch cut—even half-inch. But I haven’t seen many expensive/pro/industrial c. saws, so this is probably be my inexperience talking.


kjmcclellan

Or install long cleats to create the “groove”. 1x1 clears the length if the post (or at least the length of the intended privacy panel) nailed it screwed along the long axis of the post to create the groove.


[deleted]

I vote for this. Numerous benefits.. not removing material from your posts to reduce structural integrity. Not removing treated material and exposing non-treated surfaces. Wont have to fight with cutting a massive stack of posts you have there. Gives you the ability to easily replace panels one at a time without disturbing your posts too much. If you still need to justify a router, add a profile to the cleats on the outer edge for looks.


Ri-tie

Can you cut the groove with your circular saw and then knock the section out with a chisel?


igivafbutidowtfiwant

Tried that doesnt work well I would have to make so many cuts just to get the majority of the word out


MrJarre

That's your best bet. A router will not get it done in one pass (especially a battery powered trim router). For small groves it's good to drill holes with a spade/forstner bit and chisel or route the rest. For long groves circular saw will work better than the drill.


GrilledSpamSteaks

I did it on a router table, using a 1” straight router bit, in 4 passes for depth. Worked great. If I didn’t have that, I’d create the edges of the groove on a table saw, make slices and then hammer it out, cleaning it with a chisel. Not table saw? Do the same with that circular saw, using a guide to ensure straight lines,.


Correct-Award8182

If all you have is the circular saw and the router, run multiple passes with the circular saw to take out as much material as possible, then clean up with the router. It looks like your kind of doing that, but 4 passes with a thin blade needs to be more like 8-10 minimum. By multiple passes, I mean cut out more wood every time by moving over 1/8" or so. The more passes you make with the saw, the less likely you are to burn out your router. A more old-school way of doing this would have been to chisel out the wood remaining after that saw cuts. If anyone made a fence that way without the saws, more power to them I guess. If you have a table saw that isn't powerful enough for a dado, it would be much easier to set a fence and run each board through. If you have one that can handle a dado, just means less passes. Either of the table saw methods would be faster, cleaner, and safer.


igivafbutidowtfiwant

The first part of what you said is exactly what i did i made about 5 passes within the inch space. It just wasnt easy to knock out so i cleaned it up with the router. It just doesn’t seem like the best way to get this job done so I thought I would ask if anybody had any other ideas. Looks like I’m gonna be out there a while


Correct-Award8182

Yeah. You can run a table saw with a slight angle, a whole lot more likely to have kickback and a large accuracy cut, but it hogs out a chanel.


[deleted]

[удалено]


igivafbutidowtfiwant

THIS! This is a savior…. Now where do I find it in stores so I can get this job done tonight 😂


RustyVandura

That's a nice tool.


kesavadh

My “I need it, but I’ll never use it” twitch is strong right now.


Tha_Unknown

I like how it leaves out the price of $680


Sakowuf_Solutions

I think that's what the smiley is for.


[deleted]

[удалено]


Tha_Unknown

With enough time and dedication they could remove the wood with string. Is that a viable option? No. Just like festool single use add on isn’t. A circular saw and chisel with a clean up pass of the router would be the best.


maxyedor

Here's how I'd do it. Set a fence on the circ saw and cut the edge of the groove, one pass up either side of the post to establish the groove's borders. That kerf should be about 3/32" wide x2, leaving 13/16" in the middle to remove. Put a fence on the router base to set a 1/2" bit just clear of the previously cut kerf and again run it up one side and down the other. The fences that allow you to cut from either side will minimize set-up, only thing you may have to adjust is cut depths due to your battery powered tools being a bit under powered. ​ It would be well worth it to troll Craigslist/FB Marketplace for a worm drive circular saw and a big ass corded router, preferably on with a plunge base to make stepping through depths easier and a 1/2" collet to reduce chatter. Also buy a snow-shovel to pick up shavings, you're going to make a mess.


clarverm

Many great answers here. Best to do what fits you. Read and learn. Fence posts are wet woot. Table saw not the best answer. Build a jig for the circular saw and use that. “So many cuts” well that’s wood working! Can’t always fave fast when build a project like this. Unfortunately your router is the wrong tool. And it may tax a better router to death. Cut 2x2,s for blocking is the fastest easiest way. Grooves are not easy or fast. Good luck. Please post a final photo.


alfaole

I did exactly this on some 4x4 last week. Used a plunge saw with guide. Tried the router, but the result was nowhere good enough... Cleaned the bottom with a chisel.


mire_poix86

For one-and-done with no messing around with chisels to remove material 1) free hand router w/ an edge guide 2) router table 3) dado head on a tablesaw


igivafbutidowtfiwant

Goal is to create 1 inch channel in the 6 x 6 fence post and slide 1 inch decking boards horizontally to create fence. The router i have just isn’t getting the job done is there another way?


logsandfruit

1” boards ain’t always 1”. Measure a few


igivafbutidowtfiwant

5/4 boards


BobbMGAH

Could you just glue and screw 2x2 to the face of the 6x6 with the appropriate width between to create the channel you’re looking for?


Electrical_Sky7291

I built my fence exactly that way and they way I did it was the top comment. It took a while no doubt but once you get in a rhythm and perfect your chisel skills to chunk out the material it will go quickly


igivafbutidowtfiwant

If I could figure out how to upload a photo or video to this thread I would post how it came out


mursemanmke

Thousands of $ of lumber and a children’s toy of a router.


DUXICON

so is your suggestion to upgrade the router and use that, then? or did you just come here to make smug comments mocking the OP for asking a question?


igivafbutidowtfiwant

Trolling obviously 🙄 what a ham


lint20342

I’d be super scared to use a trim router with a 1 inch bit. If I were using that router I’d take 1/4” passes with a 1/4” bit, which will take very long. Asking too much from an underpowered tool is dangerous. And at the end of the day, safety over everything


DUXICON

i appreciate your elaboration on why using that router wouldn't be the best idea, this makes much more sense to someone who doesn't have much knowledge or experience with routers (me and possibly OP, although OP has me beat by actually owning one already lol)


lint20342

A more powerful router would be a better option. Hogging out a lot of material in 1 pass with any router is a bad idea, but gets extra sketchy with an underpowered motor. You’re asking for kick back with a router, which is basically when the router bit gets stuck in the cutting surface. The motor continutes to spin and into your hands is the only place for the router’s power to go


anasplaty

Why is it a bad router ? It works fine, it just maybe isn’t cut for this particular job.


Infinite_Local_1215

Ive had 1/4 inch router shafts snap off when it hooks into something. When routers go bad they go real bad 😂 It's a big cut for a 1/4 inch router a 3/4 in a plunge router would be safer. If you're in Canada or the USA now is a good to buy tools from Lowe's metabo is switching names so everything is marked down and you can usually get the management to take even more off.


mursemanmke

Exactly, I did t say “bad router” but it’s a terrible choice for this job. I’m presuming but it looks like OP just bought a bunch of stuff with no experience and decided to do a thing.


anasplaty

Pretty sure he was going for the Ryobi set to have only one type of battery.


Motorahead

You're making an assumption. Even if it's true, why does that even matter? Good on OP for taking on a cool project and reaching out for advice. That's a part of what woodworking is all about. Running a groove for fencing is a great idea. So stop judging and provide something valuable.


mursemanmke

Ok so 1) use of a cordless is suspect considering the size of the job at hand 2) the time this will take to do properly is pretty significant, not sure you’ve considered that 3) if you want a 1”w x 1”d dado, don’t start with a 1” bit at 1” deep. Get a guide and make very shallow (1/16 - 1/8” max) passes. 4) if you’ve never used a router to make dadoes, this is not the project to learn on 5) why 6x6 posts?? you’ve picked a VERY expensive and labor intensive way to build a fence. 6) now I’m wondering about your post hole situation, are you hand digging all of those 18” holes? How deep are you going? I’m honestly concerned that you’re out of you’re depth. Edit: you’ll need a water tight cap or hand blind dadoes otherwise your channel will fill with water and your horizontal boards will all warp and rot like crazy.


Infinite_Local_1215

Sometimes you learn the most from your mistakes 😂😂


Peterbillt676

Use either a straight edge and a circular saw or a table saw. Table saw would be the cleanest and most efficient way.


Peterbillt676

And stop wasting your money on shitty Ryobi tools


Joseph_of_the_North

I have a ton of Ryobi tools and have never had one fail. Rigid, Ryobi, and Milwaukee are all made by the same manufacturer TTI Inc. The only real difference is the warranty.


Ares__

Ryobi makes a bunch of great tools for the DIYer and the fact their battery connection remains unchanged allowing for so many tools to use the same battery is amazing. Would I buy a ryobi table saw? No. Do I own their airstrike nail guns because the price is perfect? Yes. Would I buy ryobi if it was my tool I used for my income? No. Should DIYers feel safe with Ryobi tools and appreciate a great value? Yes


rancidperiodblood

That is objectively false. I don’t like that Milwaukee is owned by the same company as ryobi but that doesn’t mean they are the same, if you just use them for light duty applications you may never notice the difference, but it’s there, it’s definitely there, tho I will say that Milwaukee isn’t as good as it used to be


Tha_Unknown

So craftsman, dewalt, and delta are still quality. Got it.


Joseph_of_the_North

Don't forget Makita.


Less-Gas-1815

Craftsman?


anasplaty

Are you trying to route that deep in one pass ?


igivafbutidowtfiwant

The route a bit only goes 3/4 so I was going to make a couple passes to get the full inch


anasplaty

Yeah but it looks like you’re trying to route the whole height of the bit in one pass which might be a bit much. Plus you don’t seem to be using a guide.


MrTommyJingles

Create a jig and incremental spacers (similar width to blade) until 1” is achieved?


Halal0szto

Table saw and dado blade. If you can only have handheld tools, then two cuts with the circular saw, and then the router in multiple passes. Will be very tedious, taken the number of your posts. I would find a way to lay out as many posts as possible. Then set up the guide on the circ saw and go thru all the posts. Then adjust the guide, do all posts again. Try finding an 1/8 in blade, it still will take many passes. The battery saw does not look like one would survive this job.


igivafbutidowtfiwant

The battery saw will 100% not get this job done I learned that halfway through the first cut. Fortunately I have a bigger corded one 👍🏻


Maleficent-Ad-6646

Use your corded circular saw and then chisel it out. This is the way.


WoodsTeacherDev

I think I would set up a straight edge that runs as long as possible, and cut 6, 8, or even 20 of the boards at once. If you had a framing square, could use that to do 4' lengths. You've got to be careful they are even, and your spacing is accurate, but you could perform one cut on all of the boards, and then move your straight edge so you get the other side of the 1", and then can keep making relief cuts with the circular saw until it's close to finished, at which point using the router to clean up the belly of the cut, will be relatively easy.


apruitt59

A router might be your best option but when your talking about taking that much wood I would look into buying or renting a larger router with a cord something in the 1 3/4 to 2 1/2 HP that will except a 1/2 shank bit.


ReallySmallWeenus

You’ve gotten most of the right answers for doing the work (table saw) but have you consider not doing it? I can’t see how having your pickets embedded in the posts will make it a better fence.


oldtoolfool

Good advice. OP has what, 24 of these to do, some on both sides? Even with one of these: https://www.toolnut.com/milwaukee-5625-20-3-1-2-max-hp-fixed-base-production-router.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9cHu5OC59wIVAP3jBx0F3gOtEAQYBCABEgLkuvD_BwE it would still be a major job, but at least you could get the proper 1" bit and make one pass. I'd suggest rethinking the design as well.


Motorahead

It would definitely look cool, no? I think some people are making this more complicated than it needs to be. I don't believe a table is a the best option for OP. Given OP has to buy one, then muscle those posts on to it with indeed and outfeed support. With the tools OP has, a circular saw will do just fine. With a steady hand, OP could mark a line and freehand the cuts as well. It's really not that hard to follow a line. That or spend the time and build the guide jig; but it's probably not a big deal if some places are off by 1/8". No one will ever notice.


ReallySmallWeenus

I don’t see it looking any better or worse than if the picket was right next to the post, and then you don’t need to worry about expanding with moisture.


Motorahead

Maybe I misunderstood the OP's design. I had the impression he was running the pickets horizontal to the posts, and stacking them into the groove?


cutters53

Router or dado blade


[deleted]

Dado stack on a table saw


Significant_Let_7170

What is the application? It looks to me like you are inserting those slats into the notch. That means the inside face doesn't have to be pretty but maybe your outside cuts do so just make a guide for your saw out of something straight and clamp or scew it on there. However you chip it out won't matter because no one will ever see it. A sawzall with some talent and a steady hand could really clean it up fast.


Significant_Let_7170

If you go the sawzall rout flip the blade over and just graze over what you need to remove and be careful. We clean up dados like that often and as long as you don't beat it up to bad you will have a clean notch.


WoodshopSquared

I do my best not to use power tools and find it much faster in many cases but that said people who use power tools or router is a pretty basic piece of equipment and not terribly expensive. I would just set my plow plane up and be done in no time.


mire_poix86

Looks like pressure treated. Please wear mask


RustyVandura

I would run the Skil saw multiple times down the groove and clean it with a chisel.


stogiemac

I have no idea what this tool is but whatever this guy is using would be perfect. Seems like an older circular saw like tool from japan. This guy does amazing work by the way. I don't understand a word but he is amazing craftsman. https://youtu.be/MQ-nTMcW0Gk?t=736


stogiemac

Here is a different video with a better example. https://youtu.be/JvDM3RPmGIc?t=386


Oldraskle

A Dado blade and table saw would do it.


bservies

Very few problems in woodworking cannot be solved with a chisel. You may not enjoy the process, but it will always work. But for what it seems you want, a track saw, router, and the router attachment to the track is what I would recommend.


patsprice

Curious what your ultimate goal is and what part your 1x1 groove plays in achieving your goal. Can you elaborate? What are you trying to build and what made you decide the 1x1 groove was the best way to do it? The answers posted will cut the groove, sure, but like klmcclellan and 3-B-Crafts said, it destroys characteristics of the post, not to mention it is a lot of work and inherently dangerous whereas there may be a better way to achieve your ultimate goal.