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Patient-Stick-3347

Look, I currently work at VMware in EUC. AWS is not even remotely comparable in capabilities. Azure has a lot of capabilities but their biggest is it’s the only place you can legitimately run the O365 versions of office. VMware is still relevant and Brian Madden has been running on name recognition more than personal innovation. IMO.


PUGILSTICKS

I work there too. The guy is salty as hell. I love the place.


virtual_crazo

I also work there and have for a total of 11 years (this is my second term…I came back because it’s a great place). It’s a fantastic company and the best place I have worked in my career when it comes to taking care of their employees.


Meatfist70

What exactly has VMware done over the last few years to bring net new EUC customers into the fold, though? Citrix converts are hardly enough, and how do you sell Airwatch over Intune when people are already balls deep in the O365 ecosystem?


yourparadigm

There's been a huge push into GovCloud to get Federal customers.


Patient-Stick-3347

I truly can’t speak to AW vs Intune. I’m an SME for horizon. Literally my job title. You cannot compare the virtual desktop experience of Horizon to the virtual desktop experience of people on Azure. The quality of the connection experience horizon provides is so many orders of magnitude better. It’s like comparing ESXi to Hyper-V. They’re not even close. There are very few customers who come to horizon as net-new because it’s 2022. Most customers are already doing some sort of desktop virtualization or published app. I can’t speak about stuff in the future but I can assure you, we are bringing a lot to the table in the next major release. We are certainly bringing more to the table than M$ and bringing more innovation than Citrix…or whatever they’re called now.


Meatfist70

That’s Brian’s entire point, though - All the BU (and company) has to offer are technologies that are best in class, but that does not matter if the technology itself is transitory. Horizon is incredible at delivering Windows desktops… but how do you compete in the long term with the people responsible for the desktop that you’re delivering? On-prem VDI has its place in certain verticals, but if there’s no net new prospects and existing customers are just going to get bled dry it doesn’t paint a good picture for the EUC BU going forward. You don’t need to defend your position my guy, I 100% agree with you and no matter what happens I’m sure those RSUs are looking great lol


Patient-Stick-3347

I think it’s because you’re not looking at our whole portfolio. We can deliver desktops from on-prem, AWS, GCVE, oracle cloud, horizon cloud on azure, and horizon on AVS. We are delivering everywhere. We have you wherever you want to host them, and we can provide the same experience and intermix. We meet the customer where they want/need to be. That level of flexibility matters and that’s the value add. Brian put this out because he has an axe to grind. His name was why we hired him and that couldn’t get results so he quit to make pinball machines. Customers liked his name and his charisma but nobody that I know inside the BU liked him because he just ran off his name recognition from 2008.


Patient-Stick-3347

You were asking for Specifics so I’ll give you three. 1) App Volumes 4 is a game changer for the Horizon customer base. There were some hiccups around JMP but with 2111, we have made good on most of those promises without the need for the overly complex JMP infrastructure. B) instant clones, which are technically a vSphere construct. We managed to leverage those in a significant way to provide much improved consolidation ratios. Couple that with intelligent provisioning and improvements in planned image upgrades, you’ve got a winner. iii) This one is more recent but, the improvements to blast have really allowed us to come more on par with ica in capabilities. Much better than PCoIP ever would have. We are far better experience than anything Microsoft offers as well.


sikfish

As someone who has bought and managed both AirWatch and Horizon in the past few years at large enterprises, and deals a lot with the rest of the stack, it doesn’t matter to most organisations whether VMware is the best. Customers get 85% of the capability from AWS, MS, Google, at a fraction of additional cost thanks to the integrated cost model. Most enterprises are not buying net new, and his points are very valid.


Patient-Stick-3347

To some customers, it may not matter. I’ve spent a ton of time in professional services. Dealing with a variety of end users during integrations. If the end user isn’t happy, it’s a big deal, and that’s where the Better product shines.


itsparadise

>Look, I currently work at VMware in EUC. AWS is not even remotely comparable in capabilities. Azure has a lot of capabilities but their biggest is it’s the only place you can legitimately run the O365 versions of office. VMware is still relevant and Brian Madden has been running on name recognition more than personal innovation. IMO. Sadly VMware is no longer relevant where I work in senior mgts' eyes.


jimmcfartypants

What he says about the vmw direction is what a lot of people who have been in IT for a while, and have seen the market trends, have said. VMwares products are becoming more and more of a legacy item. It is still pretty raw however hearing this from someone who held such a senior role there.


amgine

If they’re legacy what is the new alternative?


FabianN

AWS, Azure, etc. He says it in the post.


amgine

Doesn’t help for on prem applications, but thank you.


jimmcfartypants

>on prem applications Which will become fewer and fewer over time. ESXi isn't going to disappear in the next 5-10 years but the scale of which its deployed will reduce drastically.


imonlysmarterthanyou

There are entire industries that cannot move to a public cloud. If esxi deployments reduce over time, it’s because esxi became a liability and deployed KVM or something else as a result.


CurvaParabolica

The reality of this is - larger organizations are realizing that moving to the cloud doesn't work as well as they are expecting. We are seeing companies who have been on the cloud transition starting to move back quite a substantial amount of workloads to on-prem. So I think there is a realization that some things work great in the cloud, and others are better on-prem. I think both environments with be just as prevalent for quite a while.


Eli_eve

This makes me wonder about stuff like Azure Stack HCI. Bring your own hardware and pay $10/core per month, but then use all the same Azure tools to spin up and manage VMs without paying consumption costs. You still have the overhead of maintaining all the hardware, of course. We have a ton of one-off apps that don't have a native cloud option. The cost of going from our traditional VM-blade-SAN model to running a VM in Azure is excessive. Even the cost of a few AVDs using the burst SKU is pretty crazy.


amgine

I’d like to see this setup as our next environment. Azure works pretty well but we have some programs that were old ten years ago with a new UI slapped on it. That’s not going cloud or kubernetes


nsanity

Stack HCI is still a management dumpster fire compared to vSphere. All Stack HCI has brought to Hyper-V is Azure monitoring, and *sane* SDN management via WAC. Beyond that there is bugger all development/innovation above and beyond 2016-era S2D.


Nerdinthewoods

An issue my org has is being enterprise scale but pretty rural in the grand scheme. All our telco options are terrible, the dedicated circuits we’ve got for cloud connectivity are bad even from the best available option. Sas options work fine if it’s not high requirement but PAS solutions kinda stink for us.


Inanesysadmin

I think you are more seeing a course correction. Costs in cloud for early adopters are high. Long term I do agree VM's as a whole are going to be disappearing at scale. Applications will move more towards containers. Now there will always be an element for a need for a vm, but longer term its going to be fewer and far between. Then again things in the industry flows like fashion. We go through waves where innovation rushes certain segments to be early adopters and they walk back other segments play catch up and everything meets in the middle.


jaelae

Where I work we did some course correction where some deployments to cloud offerings were reverted back for some solutions. Along with that we opted for more dense nodes to deploy new greenfield environments in our data centers that can hold a lot more VMs as well as utilizing vSAN to move away from our traditional SAN Arrays. This way we have a more streamlined data center, less to troubleshoot, more automation and out of the box solutions. It mostly works well. However, there is still a push to move more to Cloud providers - GCP, Azure, AWS. I think as time goes on it does get a little bit cheaper for storage and compute, however, ultimately it becomes such a huge investment because we also need DR and redundancy. Internally I often hear our management talk about how we are all doomed to lose our jobs eventually. When will that day come I have no idea. I just am trying to move off of designing on prem solutions and focus more on any cloud offering since that does seem like the smart choice.


CurvaParabolica

Yeah, I agree with this


jaminator45

The hockey stick growth of cloud consumption says otherwise.


CurvaParabolica

The hockey stick cloud consumption isn’t related to my statement about large companies pulling workloads back from the cloud. Both can be true. I am not saying they are bringing everything back. My real world experience in this area with tier one enterprise organisations gives me this perspective.


bateau_du_gateau

> My real world experience in this area with tier one enterprise organisations gives me this perspective. You are correct. People who have never worked for a F100 or similar forget that these orgs already have considerable experience of building and operating datacentres. I see all the costs and for very many real workloads we can run them on-prem for a fraction of what a public cloud provider would charge (and no big org is paying list price anyway, so even after this). Everyone is excited about the sexy new technologies and is keen to use them but then we look at the numbers and - for now - it's a non-starter.


Jonko18

As someone who used to work for VMware/Dell EMC, what you are saying is a great talking point they love to repeat over and over, but the actual reality is that it's not as common as you are making it out to be, nor as dramatic. SOME organizations have pulled resources back on-prem after being overzealous in their move to the cloud, but I wouldn't say it's even a majority of the F500. And when they do pull resources back on-prem, it's not usually a large portion but very specific workloads. Not to mention, the reason a lot of organizations have been pulling resources back, isn't because the cloud will NEVER work, but because they did so prematurely without proper planning and controls in place, but as they mature in cloud adoption and processes (or even refactoring applications) they will reevaluate moving those workloads to the cloud in the near future. And honestly, most of those early movers to the cloud who are pulling workloads back have already done so. It's not as common today as it was a year ago. Is on-prem going to completely go away any time soon? No. But it IS going to continue to become a smaller and smaller part of every organization's business. I work with several F500 that are still moving everything they can to the cloud, selling their DCs (businesses really, really don't want to manage DCs anymore), and keeping their on-prem mainframe and oracle clusters in a co-lo. The difference is, they are taking their time to plan it properly and aren't just rushing into it before having proper processes in place and workload placement determined. My real world experience in this area, beyond just the VMware and Dell EMC perspective, with large enterprises, including F500, gives me this perspective.


CurvaParabolica

I don’t disagree with anything you say here. I wasn’t trying to repeat any company “line” - I am just telling people about my experience. I also wasnt suggesting this is so common the hockey stick growth of cloud would be effected. As I said - both things can be true.


Goldenu

Concur: of the many apps we've introduced over the last year, \*none\* run on our on-prem hardware.


ProgressBartender

Company proprietary information or government secure information may never have a place in the cloud. Why pretend like those scenarios don’t exist?


MoistPoolish

AWS and Azure both have government secret and top secret enclaves.


Scalybeast

That’s not true. You have AWS Outpost and Azure Stack which involve running PCP software on prem. Now implementing something like that might not make sense for someone that has no interest in expanding into the public cloud but solutions do exist.


mithoron

Kubernetes and the like


amgine

Kubernetes doesn’t run our archaic finance software. (And no finance won’t move)


mithoron

Finance never wants to move.


ultimattt

They fucked him on his severance, I’m pretty sure any kind of reservation went out the window with that.


surfzz318

He’s just mad.


jaminator45

They’ve never proved why they matter other than hypervisors.


sryan2k1

Because nothing comes even remotely close to vCenter for management. Other hypervisors work fine, but not everyone wants to hire 8 greybeards to run a KVM cluster


nullvector

ROFL, greybeards....couldn't be more accurate. You spend so much time tinkering and managing things to 'just work', as opposed to VMware which for the most part works pretty well, recent updates not-included.


xmagusx

Even if you're strictly talking about staying on prem; Proxmox and oVirt have gotten closer to vCenter every year VMware has failed to innovate. It hasn't been greybeards and raw KVM clusters for a long time. OpenStack and K8s also get more accessible by the day as well. All of which cost a fraction of the price premium that VMware commands, meaning migrations away free up money, and plenty of businesses would much rather spend their annual budget on headcount than licenses. Especially the nightmare headache that VMware licensing has become. I'm bummed, especially since the Dell merger had presented such a tremendous opportunity to just print out pre-configured, pre-validated hyperconverged bricks and turn standing up your own datacenter or virtual office into a straightforward Lego kit that required zero greybeards to administer. Pity.


amgine

A lot of companies (mine included) won’t touch a hyper visor that is supported by open source solutions only. A support contract and 24/7 help desk is required.


FarkinDaffy

Same here. It needs 24x7x365 support


GimmeSomeSugar

Many people's experience for many years has been that a VMware estate underpinned by a support contract is no different than running a VMware estate without, because VMware support is dogshit.


nixx

As an ex vmware support, it still stings when I read this, 6 years after I’ve been laid off. I loved that place.


amgine

Oh completely agreed but being able to reach an engineer at one point is better than hoping some random bug we run into is fixed by some random guy online.


ZibiM_78

look on xcp-ng or proxmox apart from community they have paid support models


xmagusx

The former does not preclude the latter. Plenty of open source projects have companies behind them offering 24/7 enterprise support. RedHat/IBM has offerings for K8s, OpenStack, and oVirt; even ProxMox has support subscriptions. All closed-source buys you is vendor lock-in.


DevinBridgwater

I actually just finished setting up a k3s cluster managed by Rancher on some old HPE servers that were getting thrown out as a homelab project with basically no prior knowledge (and a lot of help from the TechnoTim Discord). It's amazing how far the tech has come.


xmagusx

Yup, if you have three Raspberry Pis lying around, you can set up your own personal, highly available microk8s cluster in an afternoon.


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sryan2k1

Windows isn't going anywhere. It's stronger than ever in many industries.


djc_tech

Agree, we have totally dropped them - and now with this new deal I’m glad as well. This is the last year we have then and as the option runs out we’re done. We’ve migrated to Azure/AWS and since we have some on-peek we gone to an alternative HCI solution that not only runs IAAS but kubernetes natively without the VMWare tax. We will save in costs both in the cloud and on-peek as we can have a full environment on prem for k8s and deploy it to the cloud for production. Win-win for us and saves us millions


Dephrager

Can I ask what HCI solution you went with?


aredd007

I remember reading both his books about the VDI delusion and his blog. I still listen to the Virtually Speaking podcast even though new episodes are few and far between. The writing has been on the wall for a while but Pat leaving and heading back to Intel really sealed the deal. Sucks but it is the way of the tech world. Rise and shine bright like a diamond until somebody buys you up.


lost_signal

Podcast should pick back up. Pete moved roles and we should actually have more time for it. I’m going on paternity next month but plan to sneak away and record a few. There’s one in the can right now (Sazzala was really good recoded) and I’ve got a recording with house of brick on Friday. (Talking database migrations) Any guests or topics you want?


Consultick

The merger?


lost_signal

The day after it closed sure. Legally as an employee I have to act in a continuing action as though it isn’t basically. As we get closer I might be able to get some executive interviews (and that’s the insanely rare case I’d ever let corporate communications or legal review a recording before we publish) but while the Go Shop provision is active I can’t see us getting anyone on to talk about it. We have some Execs lined up for Explore, so I’ll add it to the question list (they or legal may strike it). While executive interviews may warm up with a few softballs I’ve tried to make sure they are not scripted, or pure marketing sessions. One of the most aggressive executive interviews I can think of was the one where Myles Joined is to interview Chad. It ranged from friendly to almost reminding me of Frost v. Nixon at times. We try not to pull punches. I can only think of maybe 1-2 things we’ve deleted after recording that someone requested from the corpo side.


sithadmin

I will bet $100 that John and Pete are not going to willingly put their head on the chopping block for that one lmao. If this ever happens it's going to be a puppet show directed by the Broadcom marketing folks.


depping

Give my podcast a try, Unexplored Territory, we publish a new episode every other week!


jaminator45

I left 7 years ago for AWS after hearing pat gelsinger harp over and over about how we needed to stop losing workloads to AWS. My coworkers told me I was crazy. Prior to VMware I worked at dell and it was a brutal experience. They don’t give a fuck about employees.


xmagusx

Public companies do not give a fuck about employees, only shareholders.


d12k

> They don’t give a fuck about employees To be fair this is a common sentiment at AWS too, lol. But yes VMW is a trash company with no direction these days. Pat desperately acquired to try and keep up but failed miserably at integrating those acquisitions, as far as I’m concerned.


CurvaParabolica

This is such a wrong statement its unbelievable. I have worked for 5 vendors in total in my career - VMware is by far the best vendor in terms of caring for their staff. To say they dont give a fuck about their employees is a throwaway statement from people who havent worked there for years. We get total family healthcare at top tier. I have two weeks paid leave over the xmas break that doesnt count towards annual leave. We have 4 days per year (1 per quarter) free holidays for a break. We also have an additional 4 days we can take off at any time over an above our normal holidays. We also have $1000 per year for spending on things that will improve our life, like gym, work from home equipment, apple watch, mental health. Then there is the smaller stuff like internet access and phone paid for. So yeah - tell me how many companies people work for here that have these sorts of perks? Now the Broadcom acquisition may fuck all of that up and destroy the culture, but until that happens its been ok.


sithadmin

> VMware is by far the best vendor in terms of caring for their staff. I think this comment was aimed at Dell, not VMware, based on the context above. VMware does in general do a great job taking care of employees, but that doesn't negate that the company has had a leadership vacuum for quite some time (including under the later years of Pat's tenure), suffered greatly at times due to pressures from Dell (e.g. the financial disaster that was the Pivotal acquisition; keeping non-Dell OEMs at arms-length; moderate but noticeable benefits package downgrades, etc...), and has a rivalry culture problem between BUs that hinders productivity. There are also \*serious\* engineering and QA issues coming out of several BUs that are absolutely destroying the products' reputations.


jaminator45

When I worked there they had unlimited leave. There was no vacation cap you took what you needed.


Mizzou-Rum-Ham

I'm a current VMW employee and I/we have unlimited vacation, get $1k a year for "wellness" (spent that on fishing trips last year), they match your charitable contributions dollar for dollar and give us year end bonus money towards the charity of your choice and the company pays the taxes on it. There are a lot of things wrong with VMW, but compared to my time at Oracle, PTC and AT&T, VMW is so much better its ridiculous.


MoistPoolish

Unlimited leave is overrated. When I was at Cisco we could bank our leave and cash it out at the end. I end up taking the usual vacations and holidays at VMW but at least in my BU our billable time is highly scrutinized.


lost_signal

I took 7 weeks in a year, took 4 weeks in. Row.


_lucky_777_

Interesting, I worked for PTC and VMware as well and now Broadcom. All the above is true about vmw but ultimately made no difference to me and my colleagues with toxic culture and low comp comparing to what I did. We have lost most of the team in a year. I honestly don't know why having 1k for mental health is important to people when vmware would ruin 20k worth of you mental health? What difference would 1 day a quarter make when you are pressured to meet unrealistic expectations of a company that (now we know) was bound to fail? I have to say that I am much happier in BC as they pay you more, you are given a huge chunk of stock that actually goes up and not flat/tanking, and no bs management and perception beats performance crap - numbers only. Maybe I'm being cynical idk. Met some great people along the way in vmware but never understood the vmw cult. I wish you luck moving forward, and hope you will enjoy Broadcom or any other company that you choose to work for. Regardless of your decision or outside factors that would influence your employment you are in a good position now.


ZZerglingg

I agree with most of what you said except…. Been at VMware 10 years, never had two weeks off during xmas. Last year we finally got the company shutdowns for one week at thanksgiving and the last week of the year. They haven’t offered company shutdowns for the entire time I have been at VMware (having stopped them the year before I joined). All of the shutdown and epic days are new and introduced on the tail end of the pandemic as the great resignation was picking up steam. It’s not as if VMware has been doing that forever and it would’ve likely stopped after another couple years. In addition the Internet reimbursement used to be full payment of your bill, not just $25. So we actually lost benefits there.


CurvaParabolica

Yeah, I realised after posting the break over Xmas isn’t two weeks but closer to a week. It happens in the region I am in. I think the pandemic has changed the way a lot of companies have been treating their employees, so I am glad a lot of vendors are stepping up and offering extra days


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yourparadigm

The limit is between you and your manager.


jaminator45

Oh yeah I’m not saying AWS is perfect at all. It’s a grind and management sucks. 7 years at AWS has been super stressful. It’s just odd that VMware employees are shocked at the company decline. VMware had its heyday in the early 2000s because they revolutionized how companies could consume their compute power but by 2014 anyone could see that they were going to run out of gas.


CurvaParabolica

Yeah, I can see that. I think that’s why they have been purchasing a lot of companies to diversify their portfolio of solutions.


drowningfish

This was a very tough thing to read coming from him. I've followed him when I started out and was getting my feet wet with EUC concepts, at the time Citrix Metaframe. He's been the EUC Evangelist for years that I've respected and when he switched to VMware after years of pushing Citrix, I switched to Horizon. Very tough to read this coming from him and really has me thinking.


xxdcmast

I need to hear what carl stahlhood has to say about this.


TopHatProductions115

Hearing about this hit me like a sack of bricks :( I kinda wanted to work for VMware one day...


PUGILSTICKS

You still can.


Triplobasic

IMO it's too soon to say anything, correct me if I'm wrong but these kind of transitions take years. You can atleast get VMware on your resume.


stueh

That's if they unfreeze hiring any time soon. There was a sudden hiring freeze a few hours before the news was announced. I saw comments in another thread where a couple people said they were waiting on a contract, and then it got pulled - nothing to sign, no job for you.


TheBjjAmish

It's not actually that bad.


TheBjjAmish

Personally as someone in the EUC space and have been my entire IT career the MSFT stuff is completely true. They have made it impossible to do a lot. With that being said I like Brian however, this came across as bitter and mad that he didn't get paid. Arguably I don't think he should have gotten hush money to not speak bad about the company, he was an employee who chose to quit. Simple as that. Edit for another point.**** Don't say how many miles you put in, in 4 years. We get it you traveled and spoke. Some folks though in PS have put in far more and deployed the tech vs talked about it.


yourparadigm

Yeah, this guy has an axe to grind and doesn't _really_ know what's going to happen.


TheBjjAmish

I have read from others this is his MO bashing former employers. Each to their own I guess.


DukeDude92

I am in the SEBU at VMware and specifically in the SD-WAN BU. I have spent a few hours researching various forums about the acquisition. All the responses (99+% negative) omit any reference to the Velocloud BU or their wares. My personal experiences refer to the SD-WAN BU, but it is the most fantastic culture and ethos, and we have won every Gartner Magic Quadrant published for SD-WAN. I had planned to stay here for many more years, but the collection of opinions I have read makes that aspiration seem unlikely. I genuinely hope this is not as bad as it sounds.


dgerry33

Same. I never had any intention of leaving and love my job. Now I'm trying to figure out the likelyhood that I will have a job and if I jump now. Breaks my heart honestly.


rouges

I'm on the same boat. Just took another offer from a different company and it felt like a was told I needed to leave asap as the titanic was sinking. I do enjoy my job and team, so it was a difficult decision


SonOfIslington

The most damning part of the article is here: *First, why would Broadcom want VMware without EUC? VMware EUC is no different than the rest of VMware. They have loads of tech debt, mediocre products which they mostly sell to existing customers, there hasn’t been any real vision or strategy for the past few years, and many of the best and brightest employees have left. (Not everyone of course, there are still plenty of amazing and hard working and super smart people working there, but at the collective level, no one working there would disagree with the preceding sentence.) The vibe in EUC in 2022 is not the same as it was in 2018. In 2018 we had stars in our eyes! Now it’s more like people just endure it. VMware EUC is where I was introduced to the term, “rest and vest.”"* **mediocre products which they mostly sell to existing customers** This ~~is~~ was the face of VMware's EUC BU saying this. It is shocking, but reality to anybody in the field who has had to use/sell this stuff. Horizon is a mess. Just look at the Horizon subreddit where Hilko of all people is in there looking at errors for the poor people who have to use it. That is where the solution is.


TheBjjAmish

I don't know if I would call him the "face" of the entire BU maybe of VDI but certainly not WS1 which is a whole different animal.


usethisforreddit

F


_lucky_777_

I have been in VMW EUC and my colleagues an I (who moved on to similar roles withing larger orgs) agree with most of it. WS1 is an amazing product but ever since intune was introduced and tou could get it FOR FREE (yes I know msft make money on consumption) we knew we were done. Later when intune beat ws1 within Gardner magic Q, it was not even a debate. I know you engineers don't care about Gardner MQ but people who actually make decisions on what to buy actually do, so...


travellingtechie

I agree with his comments that VMware us f*cked now, but I disagree about the direction they were headed. I dont know much about the EUC world, so that may be true. But Ive been really excited with where VMware us taking NSX, and the VMC cloud environments allow a consistency between multi cloud and on-prem environments that cant be matched. Also the SASE product is making really exciting advances is being able to extend networking and security in to EUC, on prem, branch and cloud environments.


killb0p

what's exciting with VMware SASE lately? I kicked the tires on it and it's rather bare-bones in terms of security (SSL proxy basically) and leans heavily on Velocloud and UAC. Compared to big names in the category it's not much. VMware slides clearly mention Zscaler as an option for customers who want a better featureset. I'm failing to see a killer use case unless you get it hook, line, and sinker...


hackztor

Good. I have been watching VMware decline over the years. VSAN another cost, NSX another cost all while the cloud exists (who knows what vmware was thinking). Then they want to be a middle man for easier use by people who are used to vmware instead of azure/aws but then charge a huge amount of money to be able to run in the cloud (makes 0 sense). If going to spend that much money just to have vmware in the cloud might as well just pay for the cloud...


CurvaParabolica

yeah, like thats all it takes. You can just move your apps from on-prem to the cloud without any modification and "just pay for the cloud". lol.


Scalybeast

But you literally can though. AWS and Azure(no idea what GCP does these days) have made it ridiculously easy to replicate your on-prem infra into the cloud. Are there workloads that necessitate on-prem deployments? Sure but lift and shift has been a viable plan for a lot of orgs in my experience.


CurvaParabolica

I deal with banks as part of my territory at VMWare. Every time they lift and shift their apps to native cloud without modification they almost always have headaches with it. Then after a year of battling they bring it back on prem. I am sure different countries and different industries may see different things. This is just what I am seeing in this particular area. That’s why the VMC and AVS offerings are so attractive, because they can just move them to cloud without doing anything. Often it’s just as a stop gap measure until they can transform them to native cloud apps.


Ramble81

Not to mention the cost. Pure lift and shift with no rearchitecting is expensive. Additionally you move it from CapEx to OpEx which may be easier to track but your TCO in later years (and even earlier) go through the roof.


xxdcmast

After this transition VMware will be seen as the next blackberry. For a period of time they had the lion share of hypervisor/virtualization space and through their own inaction and inability they slowly gave it all away and drifted into nothingness.


Goldenu

It was a real debate in our shop: current server needs replacing and costing out Azure vs. continued on-prem was a long and tedious process. In our case on-prem won out this time, but it was \*really\* close and I suspect this is our last on-prem server setup.


facewithoutfacebook

He sounds bitter because he didn’t get what he was promised. A lot of what he said could become true but his post has lots of personal bitterness because of the way and terms his relationship ended.


praetorthesysadmin

Damn. Brutal but honest. VMWare has been downhill for several years.


rouges

You can thank michael dell for that


FarkinDaffy

So, what are others doing without VMware in a private cloud environment? UCS mini w/ SAN, etc to run Windows servers.


xanderdad

Article taken down. Did anyone preserve a copy somewhere?


SonOfIslington

Its still up. What are you on about?


xanderdad

Maybe it's linkedin.com. Having trouble atm loading the site. (from here)