T O P
General_Juicebox

"...but Théoden could not be overtaken." is a quote from the book that I always think about when I watch this scene. He commanded the Rohirrim to rush headlong into a massive force of darkness, but he lead them.


arfbrookwood

>but Théoden could not be overtaken “Suddenly the king cried to Snowmane and the horse sprang away. Behind him his banner blew in the wind, white horse upon a field of green, but he outpaced it. After him thundered the knights of his house, but he was ever before them. Éomer rode there, the white horsetail on his helm floating in his speed, and the front of the first éored roared like a breaker foaming to the shore, but Théoden could not be overtaken. Fey he seemed, for the battle-fury of his fathers ran like new fire in his veins, and he was borne up on Snowmane like a god of old, even as Oromë the Great in the battle of the Valar when the world was young. His golden shield was uncovered, and lo! it shone like an image of the Sun, and the grass flamed into green about the white feet of his steed. For morning came, morning and a wind from the sea; and the darkness was removed, and the hosts of Mordor wailed, and terror took them, and they fled, and died, and the hoofs of wrath rode over them. And then all the host of Rohan burst into song, and they sang as they slew, for the joy of battle was on them, and the sound of their singing that was fair and terrible came even to the City.”


DirtyVT

Never forget right before this he blew on a horn so hard it fucking exploded!


papsmearfestival

I believe he says "burst asunder" which is just.... *chefs kiss*


Garrick420

Woulda been kinda funny if he actually said “fucking exploded” lol


ICallTheBigOneBity

There upon he seized a horn from Guthlaf his banner-bearer and he blew upon it such a blast as it FUCKING EXPLODED


Aitrus233

The Lord of the Rings, as read by Tenacious D.


Fourseti

Talk about a pep talk


droppinkn0wledge

This is why Tolkien occupies an upper echelon of literature than most SFF writers. These passages are more romantic myth than they are genre fiction. And that’s why Lord of the Rings is such an enduring and powerful cultural story. In a way, almost every SFF writer is still writing in his shadow.


Afferbeck_

>J. R. R. Tolkien has become a sort of mountain, appearing in all subsequent fantasy in the way that Mt. Fuji appears so often in Japanese prints. Sometimes it’s big and up close. Sometimes it’s a shape on the horizon. Sometimes it’s not there at all, which means that the artist either has made a deliberate decision against the mountain, which is interesting in itself, or is in fact standing on Mt. Fuji. Something Terry Pratchett wrote for a newspaper article in 1999.


nhaines

Pratchett had a way with words that... well, that I don't think anyone since Mark Twain had managed in English.


ComfortableWeight95

Dude could write


qscvg

Read too: https://youtu.be/LWxnHuVEwUg


tatas323

Damn, never listened to that recording, > Tolkien made it before The Lord of the Rings had found a publisher. He was rather disillusioned, even despairing about its prospects, and had lost faith in his ability as a writer. He was visiting the house of a friend (I can't recall who), and this friend had bought a fairly newfangled device: a tape recorder. >After mucking about with it a bit, recording The Lord's Prayer (to exorcise any evil spirits in it, for Tolkien was a bit suspicious of new tech), his friend suggested that he record his favourite passage from his new book. Tolkien did so, and on replaying it, the friend said, 'Surely you know that's really good?' Tolkien said, 'Yes... This machine has made me believe in it again.' >It's a sobering reminder that even the very greatest are plagued by self-doubt Don't know the veracity of this YouTube comments but amazing stuff


[deleted]

This story seems to have some truth to it, but the commenter coated the rest in bs or turned some elements to 11. The bit about visiting a friends house was true, the bit exorcising the devil he seems to have made as a joke but was true, and Tolkien felt better about his writing after hearing himself read it. The rest is made up, Tolkien was happier with his hobbit recording than his lotr one. In 1952 he was negotiating a publishing deal but it wasn’t affecting his self esteem, he was getting annoyed with the delays so he threatened to withdraw his manuscript and the publisher was like ‘okay’, not really the actions of someone who didn’t like their prospects. But he found another publisher that same year, he told him this “I am anxious to publish The Lord of the Rings as soon as possible. I believe it to be a great (though not flawless) work” [source](https://wayneandchristina.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/tolkien-and-the-tape-recorder/)


the_nix

Hobbit was published 15+ years prior to LotR, by the same publisher.


bornin_1988

Damn, that was awesome. Glad I watched that!


fatkiddown

This is my favorite story and writing from Tolkien: [The Challenge of a fight to the death of Fingolfin to Morgoth](https://imgur.com/gallery/K84eJ6c). Here is the greater passage. I highly recommend reading the entire story of this battle: *Now news came to Hithlum that Dorthonion was lost and the sons of Finarfin overthrown, and that the sons of Fëanor were driven from their lands. Then Fingolfin beheld (as it seemed to him) the utter ruin of the Noldor, and the defeat beyond redress of all their houses; and filled with wrath and despair he mounted upon Rochallor his great horse and rode forth alone, and none might restrain him. He passed over Dor-nu-Fauglith like a wind amid the dust, and all that beheld his onset fled in amaze, thinking that Oromë himself was come: for a great madness of rage was upon him, so that his eyes shone like the eyes of the Valar. Thus he came alone to Angband’s gates, and he sounded his horn, and smote once more upon the brazen doors, and challenged Morgoth to come forth to single combat. And Morgoth came. That was the last time in those wars that he passed the doors of his stronghold, and it is said that he took not the challenge willingly; for though his might was greatest of all things in this world, alone of the Valar he knew fear. But he could not now deny the challenge before the face of his captains; for the rocks rang with the shrill music of Fingolfin’s horn, and his voice came keen and clear down into the depths of Angband; and Fingolfin named Morgoth craven, and lord of slaves. Therefore Morgoth came, climbing slowly from his subterranean throne, and the rumour of his feet was like thunder underground. And he issued forth clad in black armour; and he stood before the King like a tower, iron-crowned, and his vast shield, sable unblazoned, cast a shadow over him like a stormcloud. But Fingolfin gleamed beneath it as a star; for his mail was overlaid with silver, and his blue shield was set with crystals; and he drew his sword Ringil, that glittered like ice.* *—The Silmarillion*


TomTheNurse

My all time favorite passage from Tolkien’s work. “And Morgoth came.” Chills every time.


J71919

Always cool to note that Fingolfin and Theoden are the only two characters compared to Oromë in their fury


Lanchettes

Goosebumps. Every time I read it. Goosebumps


papsmearfestival

He puts you right there doesn't he?


RichardCheeseLicker

He had great prose, and when you read his story out loud it’s almost like a rhythmic poem, it’s honestly quite astounding. His pacing could be off at times. There’s a lot of moments that suffer from over explanations or drawn out dialogue of character’s intentions that grind everything to a halt, even in tense moments. Having said that, they’re still a great read and I love them.


foul_ol_ron

I have read that he wrote it as an experiment in writing a Nordic saga, which was an oral tradition. Whilst I've read the books a few times, I much prefer the audiobook as now the poetry flows, as opposed to my reading it and botching it in my head.


HelpVerizonSwitch

It’s a little bit of an oversimplification, but yes Tolkien thought of the legendarium as a fictional British Edda, since no comparable cultural epics have ever been found from the Britons.


gonnagle

Yes, the book changes drastically when read aloud. I've loved them since I was a child but I always read them to myself - until my most recent reread, during the deep quarantine of the winter of 2020. I had crashed in bed with Return of the King after another horrible day at the hospital and my husband was on his phone while I was reading. I came to the battle and spontaneously started reading it aloud to him, and after a few sentences he just put his phone down and listened to the rest of the chapter...there's just something so poetic about the cadence, you're absolutely right. We're now listening to Andy Serkis's recording of the audiobooks and it's absolutely beautifully done, he really highlights the poetic cadence of much of the writing. In 25 years of rereading, I'd never noticed that all of Tom Bombadil's dialogue - *all* of it, not just the singing, is written in verse. Every time I read his work I am more convinced that Tolkien was a genius.


ComManDerBG

Fine! I'll read the books.


the_stormcrow

You will not regret it.


AddictedtoBoom

Good decision. Enjoy. I reread them every few years, for the last 40 or so since I first picked them up at the age of 12.


JediGuyB

One of the best parts of the trilogy. Had me ready to die for Theoden too.


whogivesashirtdotca

Bernie Hill absolutely killed in that scene. Such an inspired idea to add the sword-clanging.


enderjaca

Not a lot of paragraphs can give you goose-bumps, but this one does. Especially since Peter Jackson turned a 20-second paragraph into a 15-minute epic multi-million-dollar battle scene that was everything a reader could have hoped for.


savetheattack

The Battle of Pelennor Fields lasts much more than a paragraph in the book.


DirtyVT

One of the best chapters in the whole series. When I first read “A white tree and that was for Gondor, but seven stars…”. I was so cranked.


Gandalftron

Agreed. I think it is the single best scene in the entire history of film. It had been building up from the 2nd film.


enderjaca

Like they really left you hanging whether they would show up in time, or at all.


BaconDragon69

Fuck me that’s just... GLORIOUS, I really ought to read the books some time...


theclumsyninja

Yeah, especially when the passage that leads up to the charge is this: >In rode the Lord of the Nazgûl. A great black shape against the fires beyond he loomed up, grown to a vast menace of despair. In rode the Lord of the Nazgûl, under the archway that no enemy ever yet had passed, and all fled before his face. > >All save one. There waiting, silent and still in the space before the Gate, sat Gandalf upon Shadowfax: Shadowfax who alone among the free horses of the earth endured the terror, unmoving, steadfast as a graven image in Rath Dínen. > >"You cannot enter here," said Gandalf, and the huge shadow halted. "Go back to the abyss prepared for you! Go back! Fall into the nothingness that awaits you and your Master. Go!" > >The Black Rider flung back his hood, and behold! he had a kingly crown; and yet upon no head visible was it set. The red fires shone between it and the mantled shoulders vast and dark. From a mouth unseen there came a deadly laughter. > >"Old fool!" he said. "Old fool! This is my hour. Do you not know Death when you see it? Die now and curse in vain!" And with that he lifted high his sword and flames ran down the blade. > >And in that very moment, away behind in some courtyard of the city, a cock crowed. Shrill and clear he crowed, recking nothing of war nor of wizardry, welcoming only the morning that in the sky far above the shadows of death was coming with the dawn. > >And as if in answer there came from far away another note. Horns, horns, horns, in dark Mindolluin's sides they dimly echoed. Great horns of the north wildly blowing. Rohan had come at last.


DefinitelyNotACopMan

"Rohan had come at last" Damn man, so simple and yet reading that last line just gave me goosebumps after listening to the video someone posted above of Tolkien himself reading that passage. I have only seen the movies not read the books, I think I will rectify that.


NamesTheGame

The books are on another level. They are also the few I can read that don't make me hate the movies; reading the books makes you appreciate how amazingly well the movies translated the tone, plot, characters and themes.


TomtatoIsMe

and people have the audacity to say Tolkien has poor prose. i swear our standards of art have dropped to the actual abyss in the past few decades.


premiumrusher

Goosebumps


kinger1074

Goddamn, I've read the books twice. However this time reading this passage gave me chills. I'm not sure if it's getting older or what, but this time it just hits different. Tolkien truly is underappreciated, I might go read the books again. Edit: thank you internet stranger for taking the time to post this passage to this random video on the internet


rustyxnails

Underappreciated? My dude, Tolkien is one of the most celebrated authors of modern English.


BenjRSmith

> and they sang as they slew, for the joy of battle was on them, "M-I-C-K-E-Y M-O-U-S-E!"


phyneas

That whole passage from the book was brilliant; [even more so when read by the man himself](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6jhKEqtLxM).


Deltidsninja

I think this is more epic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWxnHuVEwUg


RustyCoal950212

I do prefer how it plays out in the book. The movie combines Theoden's and then Eomer's speeches and gives it all to Theoden. In the book, before the initial charge, Theoden says > Arise, arise, Riders of Théoden! >Fell deeds awake: fire and slaughter! >Spear shall be shaken, shield be splintered, >a sword-day, a red day, ere the sun rises! >Ride now, ride now! Ride to Gondor! And then it's Eomer, who watches Theoden get killed and finds Eowyn's unconscious body (thinking she's dead) says > 'Éowyn, Éowyn!' he cried at last: 'Éowyn, how come you here? What madness or devilry is this? Death, death, death! Death take us all!' > Then without taking counsel or waiting for the approach of the men of the City, he spurred headlong back to the front of the great host, and blew a horn, and cried aloud for the onset. Over the field rang his clear voice calling: 'Death! Ride, ride to ruin and the world's ending!' > And with that the host began to move. But the Rohirrim sang no more. Death they cried with one voice loud and terrible, and gathering speed like a great tide their battle swept about their fallen king and passed, roaring away southwards. Would have loved to see the part of Eomer rallying the troops after their king is killed, and then all screaming death as they charge again


Kevin_Uxbridge

This was the very scene I'd waited to see since I'd read this as a kid. The movie version just swelled my heart to bursting. Was also hoping to see the final stages of the Ents attacking Isengard. Movie did well as far as it did but left out the part when the Ents finally go fucking berserk. >'That sent them mad. I thought that they had been really roused before; but I was wrong. I saw what it was like at last. It was staggering. They roared and boomed and trumpeted, until stones began to crack and fall at the mere noise of them. Merry and I lay on the ground and stuffed our cloaks into our ears. Round and round the rock of Orthanc the Ents went striding and storming like a howling gale, breaking pillars, hurling avalanches of boulders down the shafts, tossing up huge slabs of stone into the air like leaves. The tower was in the middle of a spinning whirlwind. I saw iron posts and blocks of masonry go rocketing up hundreds of feet, and smash against the windows of Orthanc. Jesus. That I would like to have seen.


Aym42

>That I would like to have seen. Agreed, of all the books, Two Towers deserved a pair of movies. The ride of the Rohirrim, the Entmoot and battles, even Gimli and Legolas establishing their friendship in the caves under Helm's Deep, those were sorely missing from what was otherwise a very good storytelling.


hootie303

Glad i didn't have to scroll far to find this. I tear up every time


WickedZombie

DEATH!!!!


ShunIsDrunk

DEATH!!!


Talaraine

DEAAATH!!!


obi-jawn-kenobi

#**DEEEEAAAAATTHHHHH**


TheOne1716

[Howard Shore string section goes fucking nuts]


AdamG3RI

DEEEEAAATTTHHH


General_Juicebox

DEATH!


rooney815

DEAAAATHH


Mandalf

The Witch King's flaming sword is soo well done.


CheeseWarrior17

It is. But I'm bugged every time about how one-sided that fight was since Peter Jackson thought it would be "Cool." Gandalf is just a form of Olorin the Maiar, often considered the wisest. A Maiar who has a habit of decimating other Maiars (Durin's Bane). The witch king is a corrupted man whose powers were bestowed to him from Sauron, also a Maiar. Some other explanation was needed here because Gandalf would've mopped the floor of the King's Hall with the Witch King's face while he begged for death.


funkmon

It's not always clear how powerful people are or are not based on their type of being in Tolkien. For example, we can say pretty clearly that Galadriel has certain power beyond that of some maiar, and we can also quite clearly see that Sauron has extreme power. In addition, random dudes were slapping down balrogs all over the place in the past (like 1st and 2nd age. I'm a bit rusty. Might be in the Silmarillion, might be in one of the other random books Christopher put out.)


Afferbeck_

>In addition, random dudes were slapping down balrogs all over the place in the past That's really not the case, Balrogs were the most powerful servants of Melkor, and killed several of the top tier Elven kings including Feanor himself. As far as I recall, Ecthelion is the only one to kill multiple Balrogs, and he was still killed by one of them in the process. The only other two occasions I believe of killing a Balrog, by Glorfindel and Gandalf, were also mutual deaths. There are mentions of them being killed in the course of huge battles but I assume they were a case of being worn down by hundreds of soldiers as specifics were never given.


torts92

I've noticed PJ would always go for the dramatic even though it doesn't suit the characters and the lore in the books. No reason for Gandalf to appear so weak, but it's dramatic that way. Fall out between Frodo and Sam shouldn't happened, but it's dramatic if it did. Faramir being uncooperative, so dramatic.


faldese

I think calling it dramatic is a bit of a dismissive shorthand for what really amounts to changes to drive in other narrative beats. Gandalf doesn't appear "so weak" so much as that scene helps us understand the might and horror of the Witch King--so that when Eowyn and Merry face him later on, we understand both their terror and their dedication to their loved ones when they fight. Frodo and Sam having a falling out to show the toll the Ring is taking on Frodo's mind, and to set the stage for Frodo's failure to cast away the Ring later. Faramir being uncooperative isn't a change I *love*, but I do think, again, showing the power of the Ring is important. I mean how many people have you read insist that Sam is the *real* hero (making sure to quote that letter from Tolkien, ofc) and that Frodo is just a weak loser who failed because they don't grasp the incredible burden of the Ring? Faramir disregarding the Ring as something he wouldn't even pick up on the side of the road is good for Faramir but less for the overall narrative.


MidSolo

In short, the movie has to show through action what the book explains through narration and description.


Animated_Astronaut

Eh, it's a 3+ hour movie each time. At some point you have to move along. Tolkein didn't write a script. An exact adaptation would be gruelling, distracted, and not very good. Lovely as a book though.


Bondisatimelord

“In rode the Lord of the Nazgûl. A great black shape against the fires beyond he loomed up, grown to a vast menace of despair. In rode the Lord of the Nazgûl, under the archway that no enemy ever yet had passed, and all fled before his face. All save one. There waiting, silent and still in the space before the Gate, sat Gandalf upon Shadowfax: Shadowfax who alone among the free horses of the earth endured the terror, unmoving, steadfast as a graven image in Rath Dínen. "You cannot enter here," said Gandalf, and the huge shadow halted. "Go back to the abyss prepared for you! Go back! Fall into the nothingness that awaits you and your Master. Go!" The Black Rider flung back his hood, and behold! he had a kingly crown; and yet upon no head visible was it set. The red fires shone between it and the mantled shoulders vast and dark. From a mouth unseen there came a deadly laughter. "Old fool!" he said. "Old fool! This is my hour. Do you not know Death when you see it? Die now and curse in vain!" And with that he lifted high his sword and flames ran down the blade. And in that very moment, away behind in some courtyard of the city, a cock crowed. Shrill and clear he crowed, recking nothing of war nor of wizardry, welcoming only the morning that in the sky far above the shadows of death was coming with the dawn. And as if in answer there came from far away another note. Horns, horns, horns, in dark Mindolluin's sides they dimly echoed. Great horns of the north wildly blowing. Rohan had come at last.”


robotkiller3

Wow. Haven’t read LotR in a long time but this is a refresher of why they’re so brilliant!


Demiculverin

Especially in 2003. Hell the Fellbeast looks incredible.


TheFlashFrame

Literally all of the CGI in these movies is fucking impeccably well done, and absolutely unbelievable for the time these movies came out. Smeagle still looks good (not perfect, when he shuffles on the ground there's no dirt kicked up so if you watch his feet, it looks very fake, but god damn does he look good), the trolls in the background of this scene look fucking real to this day, the Fellbeast is pretty impressive. Honestly the worst looking shots are the ones where greenscreens are used because, this having been shot on film, there aren't clean lines at the edge of the characters so its very feathered which is a telltale sign of greenscreening. But when *that's* the worst looking thing 2 decades later, holy shit. One thing that helps is that this movie was made using motion capture and a program called Zbrush, both of which were completely brand new technologies at the time and both of which wouldn't even be commonly implemented for about another decade. EDIT: btw if anyone wants to go down a CGI rabbit hole, do a google image search for zbrush.


Javanz

>Literally all of the CGI in these movies is fucking impeccably well done, After watching the Bakshi adaptation (which i mostly adore), I remember having a dread feeling in my gut about how well realized the Balrog would be. My jaw fucking dropped when we saw it in it's full majesty, and it did that roar


TonalParsnips

“RUN” 11 year old me: Oh hell yeah, this is some deep psychological damage.


PostwarVandal

Indeed, that Balrog surpassed any and all expectations of having a fiery demon on-screen.


My-Life-For-Auir

There's a great video on YouTube that explains how perfectly timed LotR was. CGI was good enough to give us the balrog, trolls and others but still too slow and expensive so they couldn't just replace everything with it like the Hobbit or Amazon's new series. We'll never get a trilogy like this again.


Ledoux88

> they couldn't just replace everything That didn't stop George Lucas when making Attack of the Clones in 2002 If someone told him that, he probably replied with "hold my beer"


culb77

Question for those who studied this: When cavalry charges and tramples the enemy, how do horses behind not break their legs on falling bodies and uneven ground?


kiawithaT

I'm sure there's an equestrian/historian with more insight, but based on my own passive civilian interest, cavalry charges were nothing like depicted here. This is pure fantasy, but the tl;dr to your question is if they managed to get into a situation like this, they often fell and died just as one would imagine. For starters, the horses would not be urged into a full gallop from the get-go. They would always start at a trot and accelerate as they got closer, fully charging in the last couple hundred meters to ensure their horses didn't get tired. This gave the horses more ability to jump, sidestep and keep moving through the field of battle even if their rider was fighting. Additionally, charges weren't often used to disperse or break a line in infantry, that was often other infantry and archery units' jobs. Cavalry was there to battle other cavalry, cut lines through the battlefield and disrupt locked fights and essentially deliver knights deep into a battlefield. Additionally, infantry were less a threat to the cavalry because infantry units would often break or run under a charge from mounted cavalry; the real threat was the archers, who could wound the animal and unhorse the knight or noble riding it. Later on, horses mainly became a way for knights or nobility to get to and from the battlefield, as it wasn't uncommon for cowardly nobles to flee a failed battle on horseback and abandon their infantry. I believe this is why in the Battle at Bosworth, King Richard III killed his horse in front of his infantry - it was him pledging to either win the battle, or die with his men. He would not be able to run away. Often, horses were placed in rows like we see with the Rohirrim but far more spaced out. The charge itself would form more of a V, also seen in this scene. Tight formations where riders rode knee-to-knee were much more dangerous and were generally performed by experienced, hardened soldiers or knights and not the riding nobility. Generally, a horse in the second line would have a clear view between the two horses on either side of it in the front line, and space between their charges. This meant that there was more opportunity to jump or sidestep any potential fallen horses or corpses. These rows wouldn't generally run more than a few deep, as the concept of having this many mounted riders didn't really apply to actual medieval armies. In the instances when it did run too deep or the formation wasn't done at the right speed or spacing, you would have spectacular fails the resulted in armoured riders being unhorsed, fallen comrades being crushed by their own charge and yes, horses slipping or tripping on bodies of humans and horses. Horses were a special resource, often only nobility and knights rode them. As such, there were far fewer cavalry or even Knights on a battlefield than we imagine today. There were specific battles where charges were led for different reasons, but mostly charges were led against other cavalry because infantry units would simply scatter rather than get turned into jelly. Later on in the period when muskets came into effect, volleys of musket fire were the main enemy of cavalry charges. If you're interested in how cavalry fared against muskets in active battle, you should check out the Battle of Minden, as that was a perplexing battle of surprise tactics that involved some impressive yet doomed cavalry charges.


ppitm

Goddamn, I have been waiting for this day, when the top Reddit comment on this topic is actually a good one, and not a variation of fuddlore #1 or fuddlore #2: #1 Knights were medieval snowplows #2 Horses are too scared to run into people Well done.


DarkApostleMatt

Here is an account from a young Winston Churchill from the battle of Omdurman in 1898, I'm posting to illustrate what it would look like irl "Two hundred and fifty yards away the dark-blue men were firing madly in a thin film of light-blue smoke. Their bullets struck the hard gravel into the air, and the troopers, to shield their faces from the stinging dust, bowed their helmets forward, like the Cuirassiers at Waterloo. The pace was fast and the distance short. Yet, before it was half covered, the whole aspect of the affair changed. A deep crease in the ground---a dry watercourse, a khor---appeared where all had seemed smooth, level plain; and from it there sprang, with the suddenness of a pantomime effect and a high-pitched yell, a dense white mass of men nearly as long as our front and about twelve deep. A score of horsemen and a dozen bright flags rose as if by magic from the earth. Eager warriors sprang forward to anticipate the shock. The rest stood firm to meet it. The Lancers acknowledged the apparition only by an increase of pace. Each man wanted sufficient momentum to drive through such a solid line. The flank troops, seeing that they overlapped, curved inwards like the horns of a moon. But the whole event was a matter of seconds. The riflemen, firing bravely to the last, were swept head over heels into the khor, and jumping down with them, at full gallop and in the closest order, the British squadrons struck the fierce brigade with one loud furious shout. The collision was prodigious. Nearly thirty Lancers, men and horses, and at least two hundred Arabs were overthrown. The shock was stunning to both sides, and for perhaps ten wonderful seconds no man heeded his enemy. Terrified horses wedged in the crowd; bruised and shaken men, sprawling in heaps, struggled, dazed and stupid, to their feet, panted, and looked about them. Several fallen Lancers had even time to remount." "Meanwhile the impetus of the cavalry carried them on. As a rider tears through a bullfinch, the officers forced their way through the press; and as an iron rake might be drawn through a heap of shingle, so the regiment followed. They shattered the Dervish array, and, their pace reduced to a walk, scrambled out of the khor on the further side, leaving a score of troopers behind them, and dragging on with the charge more than a thousand Arabs. Then, and not till then, the killing began; and thereafter each man saw the world along his lance, under his guard, or through the back-sight of his pistol; and each had his own strange tale to tell." Another irl account I can recall would be from William Hay during the Waterloo campaign who observed the charge of the Union Brigade "They came down the slope...like a torrent, shaking the very earth, and sweeping everything before them...the heavy brigade from their weight went over [the infantry] and through them... it struck me with astonishment, nor had I till then, notwithstanding my experience as a cavalry officer, ever considered what a great difference there was in the charge of a light and heavy dragoon regiment, from the weight and power of the horses and men." And here is an account from Captain Duthilt about receiving the charge from the Royal Scots Greys "Just as I was pushing one of our men back into the ranks I saw him fall at my feet from a sabre slash. I turned round instantly – to see English cavalry forcing their way into our midst and hacking us to pieces. Just as it is difficult, if not impossible, for the best cavalry to break into infantry who are formed into squares and who defend themselves with coolness and daring, so it is true that once the ranks have been penetrated, then resistance is useless and nothing remains for the cavalry to do but to slaughter at almost no risk to themselves. This is what happened, in vain our poor fellows stood up and stretched out their arms; they could not reach far enough to bayonet these cavalrymen mounted on powerful horses, and the few shots fired in chaotic melee were just as fatal to our own men as to the English. And so we found ourselves defenceless against a relentless enemy who, in the intoxication of battle, sabred even our drummers and fifers without mercy." Basically the goal of the cav is to break through the infantry and scatter them, but a solid pack of men can be difficult to break even with hundreds of heavy horsemen. Both riders and the horses can be sent flying and it can become a chaotic quagmire is they get stuck in the middle of the infantry and that is if they manage to penetrate the lines. Sometimes the cavalry when not meeting with success would pull back and try to charge again and again to wither break the line or wear the morale of the footmen down.


Indercarnive

>how do horses behind not break their legs on falling bodies and uneven ground? They did. Which is why history has very few cavalry charges on uneven and dangerous terrain, charging head-first into the enemy. Not zero though, but it's rare precisely because it was dangerous and not terribly likely to succeed.


chevria0

TRUE 4K UHD... compressed to shit by YouTube


slayez06

and not atmos either


DrDragun

Still the most hype scene in movie history to me


skytomorrownow

Even though I know the Riders are coming, when they arrive – when those war horns blow – when you realize how many there are – it just lifts you like you cannot believe in the darkest moment of the story. "Death!" The other moment that I know is coming and gets me every time is when Aragorn stops the victory celebrations to honor the Hobbits: “My friends, you bow to no one.” I'm getting a little watery-eyed just thinking about it.


Vet_Leeber

The Last March of the Ents has always been a close second for me. Treebeard's monologue as he realizes what's happened, immediately makes a quick decision (showing they're capable of doing so when needed), and none of the other ents hesitating for a moment before coming when he calls.


nwaa

"Come my friends. The Ents are going to war...it is likely that we go to our doom. *The Last March of the Ents* " Chills.


THE_SHOES

just reading it gave me chills. i love all the scenes with the ents, they are absolutely my favorite.


vanillaacid

I LOVE reading the ent section out loud to my kids. I try to do the voice, and speak slower, and the kids eat it up. My absolute favourite thing to read aloud.


ZippyParakeet

I love how he said that the Ents were probably headed to their doom but they had like zero deaths in the battle, only a few injured Ents but that's it. At least that's how it was in the movie.


MrDSkis94

It’s impossible for me to not ugly cry during that scene. Also Aragorn’s speech before the black gate. Chills every time.


Framingr

For me it's the death of Boromir. It kills me, he knew he had fucked up and he gave everything he could to try make it right, then the scene with him and Aragorn ... Yep ugly man tears.


Phantompooper03

My brother. My captain. My king. Ugh, me too man. Me too.


whogivesashirtdotca

Viggo's tears always spring from his depths.


notmyrlacc

“For Frodo”


WannieTheSane

The looks on their faces as they realise not only is Frodo alive, but he's succeeded. Against all hope he's destroyed the ring. We've just spent the last week or so watching The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, all extended editions. First time my kids saw it. They really enjoyed them, but, how can you not?


coletrain644

"...but it is not this day..."


RichardCheeseLicker

Sam’s speech about stories and what’s worth fighting for also gets me teary eyed. As well as: > “You’re missing out one of the best characters Samwise the Brave, I wanna hear more about him… Frodo wouldn’t have gotten far without Sam” > “Don’t make fun Mr Frodo, I was being serious” > “So was I…” > Frodo walks away > “Samwise the Brave” > Frodo smiles It’s the quiet moments in this trilogy that make it absolutely perfect, just such magic in little human moments in the face of overwhelming odds and the faint glimmer of hope.


lifeisaheist

Come Mr. Frodo. I can't carry it for you, but I can carry you! Damn.


GrandBed

People forgot Tolkien served in the meat grinder that was WWI notable Somme. The Bloody Battle of Somme, the story was always about fellowship between brothers.


j-clay

Although I've watched this movie - never mind this scene - dozens of times, I've never noticed he yells "Death!" before. It adds a whole new layer to the Witch King asking Gandalf about not knowing death when he sees it.


drchaos2000

i cant carry it for you... but i can carry you


Karnadas

And it's the first time we see the orcs showing fear to the men, these riders heading towards them screaming "DEATH" at the top of their lungs


[deleted]

>The other moment that I know is coming and gets me every time What about when Sam says "Share the loaaaad"


ogtfo

> RIDE FOR RUIN, AND THE WORLD'S ENDING! >DEATH! DEATH! DEAAAAAAATH! I still watch this scene every few months. It's amazing


snakeoilHero

Home theater test scene #1 for me. Trumpet surround bass battle effects and the all time war speech vocals


wizardyourlifeforce

Amazing scene but I kind of like the charge at Helm’s Deep better.


FuzzyCollie2000

God I wish I'd been able to see it in theaters.


mangongo

When Frodo and Sam pass out on the rock after the ring is destroyed, the screen stayed black so much longer than the dvd/blurays. I remember people thinking it ended and a few people got out of their seats to leave.


mrboom74

These movies were my “Star Wars” growing up. Granted, I actually did get Star Wars with the prequels, but these movies had such an impact on me and my interests to this day.


post_apoplectic

The first time I saw Fellowship was with my grade 6 class, we went on a field trip to see it!! So dope. Now that you mention it, I do feel lucky to have been able to see them when they released. The collective hype while waiting for the other two films to drop was next level too


waitingtoleave

Never fails to get me going!


Boredom-Warrior

Well looks like my next 11 hours are spoken for.


notorious_8201

Seriously, just killed my weekend. I'm okay with it though.


TomTheWaterChamp

Silly question but did you buy it on blu-ray or is it streamable in 4k anywhere?


The_Cooler_Guy

This is the best scene. This force rolls up to Gondor not knowing what to expect after days of marching. What do they find? The city has pretty much fallen and is completely surrounded, Rohan is easily outnumbered. They could've just turned around and went home, but what do they do? They line up and charge without even thinking about while screaming Death at the top of their lungs. Such a legendary moment


buckydean

The passage in the book always gives me chills too. It's the very last paragraph in the chapter: >In rode the Lord of the Nazgûl. A great black shape against the fires beyond he loomed up, grown to a vast menace of despair. In rode the Lord of the Nazgûl, under the archway that no enemy ever yet had passed, and all fled before his face. >All save one. There waiting, silent and still in the space before the Gate, sat Gandalf upon Shadowfax: Shadowfax who alone among the free horses of the earth endured the terror, unmoving, steadfast as a graven image in Rath Dínen. "You cannot enter here," said Gandalf, and the huge shadow halted. "Go back to the abyss prepared for you! Go back! Fall into the nothingness that awaits you and your Master. Go!" The Black Rider flung back his hood, and behold! he had a kingly crown; and yet upon no head visible was it set. The red fires shone between it and the mantled shoulders vast and dark. From a mouth unseen there came a deadly laughter. "Old fool!" he said. "Old fool! This is my hour. Do you not know Death when you see it? Die now and curse in vain!" And with that he lifted high his sword and flames ran down the blade. >And in that very moment, away behind in some courtyard of the city, a cock crowed. Shrill and clear he crowed, recking nothing of war nor of wizardry, welcoming only the morning that in the sky far above the shadows of death was coming with the dawn. And as if in answer there came from far away another note. Horns, horns, horns, in dark Mindolluin's sides they dimly echoed. Great horns of the north wildly blowing. Rohan had come at last.


ace1oak

ive seen the trilogy at least 10 times... yeah its time to ready the books !


Kangermu

Oh my goodness... If you haven't read it yet, you're in for a treat. The movies are so good because they get so close to the books, which are pretty subjectively on another level


Airbornf

So jealous of you. Andy Serkis performs a wonderful audiobook reading as well, if that is your speed.


dandaman910

I like this scene for what it does to Théoden's character. By this point he's ha his body possessed, his son killed, deserted by his allies, his land pillaged, chased halfway across the country and back, and faces doubts over whether its worth it to keep fighting. It the books it goes on about how he is thought of as a lesser king on Rohan not like the great Kings of old. Because he has led his kingdom into such ruin while he was possesed, it touches on this in the movies too. This is his ultimate triumph to say you may take our lives but you will not make us slaves. we're laying down the gauntlet and we will fight you until the last tether breaks. In the books the triumph is even greater because initially it looks like he's going to slink away in fear, but then it's as if a supernatural spirit of bravery takes hold of him and surges through him making him look like even the most powerful of Kings not seen since the first age. It spreads through his soldiers ranks and leads to a charge of legendary ferocity. Its the charge of the Rohirim that win the battle not the dead men. He becomes one of the most heroic character in the series. And holds him as Rohans greatest king ever once victory is finally achieved.


ThiccKarambwan

> They could've just turned around and went home They knew they could not turn around and go home. If they did, all free men of Middle Earth would fall to Mordor. The Rohirrim were the last chance to break the siege and turn the war around. That's why they screamed "Death!". It wasn't for their enemies, but for themselves because it was either die breaking the siege or the realm of men falls forever.


papsmearfestival

I also love when the oliphants are running at Theoden and he doesn't hesitate... "SOUND THE CHARGE!"


ShunIsDrunk

It’s precisely this why I chose to highlight this as an example of what “bravery” is to my son. You do it even though you’re scared and it’s the right thing to do.


ThatMortalGuy

I like the bit when she says "Courage for our friends" you know you might not make it and is very scary but you still do it for them.


ddh85

Ride to ruin and the world's ending!


FranklyIAmZach

“Hello Mr. Drunk, it’s Drunk Jr’s teacher at school. We had a bit of an incident; it appears he led a group of kindergartners on a charge at the third graders while screaming death at the top of their lungs. While they DID hold the phalanx quite well, we’re going to have to ask about the home environment.”


OrangeCain

This genuinely made me laugh. Very well done


saors

> You know fleas, yes? Those tiny insects? Even though we humans are giants to them, they still attack us. Would you say that is courage? No, the flea does not possess courage.Then what is courage? Courage is to know fear! To master it and make it your own! -Will Anthonio Zeppeli


Sentinel-Prime

Top dad shit right there keep it up


BluntHeart

To those who are more philosophically inclined, courage and bravery are 2 notably distinct nouns. Bravery is the ability to confront pain, danger or attempts of intimidation without any feeling of fear. It is strength in character that allows a person to always be seemingly bigger than the crisis, whether he is indeed more powerful or is lesser than what he is tackled with. Courage, on the other hand, is the ability to undertake an overwhelming difficulty or pain despite the eminent and unavoidable presence of fear. More than a quality, it is a state of mind driven by a cause that makes the struggle all worth it. Unlike in the case of bravery, a person fueled by courage may feel inevitably small in the face of peril, pain or problems. The essence of courage is not the feeling of being certainly capable of overcoming what’s one is faced with, but rather is the willful choice to fight regardless of the consequences. This may not mean much to you, but I always like to use this.


Spartan05089234

I'm convinced this is the scene that won the movie its best picture Oscar.


whogivesashirtdotca

Honestly, as good as it was, the Oscars were basically predetermined. Fellowship deserved one more, IMO, but the Academy never rewards the first in a series.


PT10

Yup, they waited, everyone waited for the 3rd one. Then it steamrolled the Oscars like Theoden's army did to the orcs here


Level_Forger

When your speech is so good that it makes even Aragorn’s later in the film seem relatively lackluster.


NeitherAlexNorAlice

A day may come when the speech of Aragorn fails, when we forsake our feelings and break all bonds of logic, but it is not this day. I will not tolerate any Aragorn defamation in this post.


bheilig

I have a nice TV and audio system. What is the best way to watch this? Are there any streaming services that are good enough? Or do I need to buy, like, a blu-ray player? Edit: Looks like I need a blu-ray player.


PancakeZombie

From experience get a 4k player. Playing from Blu Ray gives you the highest quality you can possibly get. Streaming will always have some sort of compression.


ProjectAra

You can also RIP BR disks and play it via an external hard drive through Nvidia Shield or Firestick.


ProjectAra

If you want you can also DM me to get suggestions about home cinema things.


bennypeabody

Regardless of setup, go with the extended version


triangulumnova

4K Blu-Ray is where it's at for me. I don't have to worry about data caps, streaming quality, or the non-ownership of digital media.


terminalblue

I use an xbone, 4K TV, proper configuration, and 5.1 sound. It gets the job done every time. Also...make sure if you have ANY kind of motion smoothing or anything like that you take it and burn it in a fucking fire.


SonsofDurin27

Honestly, what gets me the most about this scene after countless rewatches of the trilogy isn't Theoden, it's Merry. Can you imagine how he feels always kind of being on the outskirts of fighting or running from a fight, and now suddenly he's about to charge headlong into war? You can see it on his face when the Rohirrim first arrive to the field. He's terrified. He's like a grunt that thought they were prepared for what they were about to get into, but now that he's face to face with the enemy with no way out, the realization that he might die here is truly hitting him. It's not until he hears the inspiring rally from Theoden that his attitude changes and he's ready for battle again. Amazing acting from both portraying that feeling imo.


Ok-Kaleidoscope5627

Don't forget Pippin! He has just seen the entire defense falling apart, Denethor going insane, Gandalf calling for a retreat, and as they're rushing to stop Denethor the Witch King lands in front of them. Gandalf the White attempts to raise his staff and fight off the Witch King who simply shatters the staff and knocks Gandalf to the ground. What does Pippin do? He tries to rush in there. Yes he's stunned by the same power that stunned Gandalf but Pippin was ready to fight probably the second most scary thing in Middle Earth after Sauron himself.


saltedpecker

Pippin is stark fucking mad there. After seeing Denethor, steward of the mighty city, go insane, the defenses falling left and right and all over, the forces overwhelming, everything seeming lost. Then he sees Gandalf, who literally rose from the dead, the most powerful being he has ever seen, get knocked down with one strike by the most terrifying creature riding an equally terrifying creature. And he fucking runs toward it. Jesus what a fucking madlad.


dudemeister5000

Aragorn said it best, when he was crowned king. There is nobody as brave as those four hobbits in the entire world. Sure others fight for their lives a lot more than them and of course Legolas, Gimli and so on are also brave but imagine being the "weakest" race in terms of physical strength compared to all the others, yet those are the ones that by the end were absolutely key to victory. Merry and Pippin have come from being field thiefs to kings guard and Rohirim while Frodo and Sam in fact simply wandered into Mordor to do the absolut shit impossible. I cry everytime that Aragorn recognizes their accomplishments even though it was his day.


Cpt_Hook

Pure adrenaline right there. A great leader channels that into fight instead of flight.


Gules

FORTH EORLINGAS!!!!!!!!!!!


two-thirds

God damn, this footage is timeless. Not only because of, obviously, the prodigious use of practical effects but the CGI that is there is so tasteful and restrained. This remastered footage looks pretty good on my monitor looks better than I remember in the theatre. I really need to get into 4K. The dirt, grit, wrinkles on the orc's scowl. The battle-worn yet beautifully ornamental armor. My fondness for LOTR movies just grows with time.


dub-fresh

Literally the only dvd I own is LOTR box set extended edition in UHD. Best $100 ever spent


J4nG

Yeah the only CGI weakness I could spot rewatching this is that the smoke sim isn't quite up to par with todays standards. But for 2003, man, what an achievement.


trevdak2

IIRC it was the "Massive" tech that let them simulate tens of thousands of troops acting apparently independently, it was completely mind-blowing. Previous large computer-generated battles either looked fake or had some heavy rubber stamping.


KRIEGLERR

It's aged well but some horse falls/roll looks a bit "wonky" now.


TomLube

Jeeeeesus this is 2003? Insane.


lemonylol

The remaster is totally different from the theatrical, they change the look of all three films to make them match the more serious colour grading of The Hobbit but without the bloom. For example that heavy ass washed out green in the first scene of Fellowship and the brownish look of Rivendell are no longer there. It's the best 4K remaster in my collection.


two-thirds

Gat damn! You weren't kidding. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Wy9cwgT5sQ


Mao_Herdeus

This trilogy in UHD is one of my treasures. It's so pretty. So many new details you find in 4k (even some funny ones like Gandalf's stunt double in a few horseback scenes).


dangerousbob

Aged like wine.


Dontlagmebro

The finest of wine.


hughheff

a PINT of wine


EyeHaveNoBanana

They come in pints?!?!


randomCAguy

I'm getting one.


TomXizor

Are you suffering from chills, euphoria and goosebumps? If you are currently not exhibiting these symptoms, see a psychicartist as soon as possible.


RichardCheeseLicker

> see a psychicartist The fuck am I gonna do with a psychic that draws shit?


rondonsa

You mean [this guy?](https://psychic-artist.com/)


esp735

Crying my ass off right now.


kaiseresc

the only thing missing in this movie was Eomer screaming "Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!". Everything else about Rohan was always amazing.


mangongo

Maybe he'll get to say it when they finally take down Homelander.


aipj

Wait what? Eomer is Butcher?! WTF i've only now made the connection holy shit


GrandBed

Yeah Karl Urban has been in LoTR, Star Wars, Star Trek, Bourne, Marvel, etc. Dude is wandering in and out of popular generation defining movie series like no one’s business.


somefatman

Then the Rohirrim arrived Coming down the mountainside Then the Rohirrim arrived Coming down they turned the tide


butts____mcgee

It blows my mind that there are people whining about this scene. "Oh that's not what actually happened", "this is offensive to Gandalf" blah blah. Yes, I agree, I love the books too. But reality check. This is the best a fantasy adaptation is ever going to get. Period. And it's *fucking amazing*. The music, the direction, the the drama, the way we connect with the characters. I just don't understand what some of you people want. Perfection doesn't exist, guys. Everything is compromise. If you want big screen Hollywood TV or film adaptations, you have to trade their existence at all for liberties on the part of the producers who do what they do to try to appeal to wider audiences. That's just how it works. All we can do is hope the compromises are achieved in a way that maintains the spirit of the original work. And the PJ trilogy does that in spades. I remain hopeful that the RoP will too - certainly the scene with Galadriel discovering Sauron's mark gives me hope that they have succeeded.


Viviere

To me, this is the greatest scene in any movie, ever. It triggers emotions in me that I sometimes forget that I am even capable of. Never have I watched this scene without getting the shills, even my eyes getting watery. It is so fucking good. The slow buildup and anticipation, the music of Rohan, everything. Peter Jackson should get a special Oscar every year for theese 5 minutes. It is so. Fucking. Good.


RGavial

I felt like the gravity of this entire battle was somewhat undone with Aragorn showed up with the undead and they killed everyone in like 30 seconds. They (he?) should have made them a little less capable perhaps. The movie builds so much on the "coming together" of various races, but ultimately an obscure (and hastily mentioned) pact with the undead that did 99% of the heavy lifting. It's like if Aragorn hadn't stopped to take a dump on the way there, thousands of deaths would have been averted.


Sarkelias

The dead didn't even show up there in the books, they just helped take the ships and relive pressure on Dol Amroth so that their army, in turn, could arrive at Minas Tirith. They got used as a giant plot device rather at the expense of some semi-important minor characters.


RGavial

I figured that. Pretty hasty in the movies.


macnbloo

The problem is they would have to do a whole detailed character with a backstory and character development in Imrahil which they chose to ignore for the movies which still ended up being so long lol


xnyer

OMG it's so nice to see someone else say this.


TomGNYC

Is the scene where the Witch King breaks Gandalf's staff in the book? I don't remember it.


uki11

No, there's no such scene in the books. In the books, Gandalf and the Witch-king meet at the main gate of the city when Sauron's forces breach it. There are no big trolls with sledgehammers like in the movie. Instead, Witch-king enters first and Gandalf opposes him. They are then interrupted by the sound of Rohan's horns, and the fight between them doesn't take place. The quote from the books is much better imo, and always gives me chills: “In rode the Lord of the Nazgûl. A great black shape against the fires beyond he loomed up, grown to a vast menace of despair. In rode the Lord of the Nazgûl, under the archway that no enemy ever yet had passed, and all fled before his face. All save one. There waiting, silent and still in the space before the Gate, sat Gandalf upon Shadowfax: Shadowfax who alone among the free horses of the earth endured the terror, unmoving, steadfast as a graven image in Rath Dínen. "You cannot enter here," said Gandalf, and the huge shadow halted. "Go back to the abyss prepared for you! Go back! Fall into the nothingness that awaits you and your Master. Go!" The Black Rider flung back his hood, and behold! he had a kingly crown; and yet upon no head visible was it set. The red fires shone between it and the mantled shoulders vast and dark. From a mouth unseen there came a deadly laughter. "Old fool!" he said. "Old fool! This is my hour. Do you not know Death when you see it? Die now and curse in vain!" And with that he lifted high his sword and flames ran down the blade. And in that very moment, away behind in some courtyard of the city, a cock crowed. Shrill and clear he crowed, recking nothing of war nor of wizardry, welcoming only the morning that in the sky far above the shadows of death was coming with the dawn. And as if in answer there came from far away another note. Horns, horns, horns, in dark Mindolluin's sides they dimly echoed. Great horns of the north wildly blowing. Rohan had come at last.”


nwaa

Can we just take a moment to rep Shadowfax? Literally stood his ground against the Witch King, Gandalf is an Istari but the Mearas was just as badass.


thedrizztman

I'll always rep Tolkien for his love of horses and respect her held for the role they played in WWI.


Physicist_Gamer

Shadowfax is an absolute boss. The relationship between Gandalf and Shadowfax is one of my favorite from the series.


papsmearfestival

I remember reading this as a teenager and having to close the book with joy when I read "Rohan had come at last".


_MaZ_

Do you not know death when you see it, old man?


larrythefatcat

> 5.1 Dolby Atmos Audio On a random YouTube upload? Ha! Good one! EDIT: Hmm... my TV app says that 5.1 is turned on (5.1 doesn't show as an option for most videos, so TIL that non-YouTube Originals can be uploaded with 5.1), but it's set to play the native audio and I'm getting *nothing* from my rear surrounds. HDR usually works on my TV's YouTube app, too, and I'm not getting HDR either.


Seyda0

I need me a 4k screen


GoldenGonzo

Officially remastered by who?


eq2_lessing

There is a generation of us who can't see this without tearing up.


Gamer_ely

I feel like every year this gets re-released with more numbers at the end and I don't know what any of them have meant.


Wepmajoe

This is the same 4K release from 2020


Themfruckus

This is the most moving scene in the series for me.


mthnkiw817

This was my best friends favorite moment in the books/movies and I’ll be damned if I’m not crying 2 sentences into either of them every single time. So powerful


raggiey

Was going to watch this on my phone. Then I remembered I've got tickets to a LOTR:ROTK screening tomorrow night with a live orchestra. Think I'll revisit this scene then instead.


fidderjiggit

I'm sorry but the Witch King absolutely did not have the power to challenge Gandalf. Like at all.


PancakeZombie

Watching this just now makes me realize how terrible the overall strategy of Saurons forces was. They have an air force. If they used the Nazgul for reconnaissance they could've spotted the Rohirim from miles away and prepare a defence. Instead they were used for ineffective ground attacks.


Amedais

The Rohirrim took a more conceiled path to Minas Tirith through the mountains for this specific purpose (in addition to it actually being a short cut). It isn't covered well in the movies, but the books spend a whole chapter on their route to the city.