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AJPowers17123

How the key machines I’ve used work as well Genius design, I’d like to make something to better understand stack-ups and where it’s limited in tolerance


jamesianm

This manufacturing technique has been around longer than you would think. They used similar devices in the 1800s to shape rifle stocks.


stevethegodamongmen

I often work with an old model making company in Chicago. They now exclusively use 3D printers, but in the past they would make copies of models using a bunch of these Pantographs


BukkakedFrankenstein

Pantograph also used on boat props! I still can’t believe they make plane props out of woods per all the FAA regs, I worked in an aerospace shop shits nuts what they don’t allow/allow…


BukkakedFrankenstein

A sheet of polycarbonate with certs made into a part can be installed in a plane and flown for 30+ years, yet a sheet of polycarbonate with certs couldn’t sit in our warehouse for over a year before it was thrown away. Literally 1000 dollar sheets of material thrown in the trash, or we were allowed to take them home


Stealfur

Well, there are regulations governing the materials they can be made of. Like Cardboard’s out…No cardboard derivatives, No paper, no string, no cellotape...


BukkakedFrankenstein

Some of the machined metal parts we had to deal with had grain direction requirements, In wood you can see the grain direction but not necessarily the imperfections inside the grain of the wood.


Quibblicous

Part of the reason wood props are still allowed is that in general they’re pretty safe, fairly inexpensive, and for historic aircraft or historic reproductions, they look right.


BukkakedFrankenstein

FAA doesn’t give a shit about expensive… literally everything in aerospace is expensive as hell. Any material with certs you can add 20 to 70% markup on top of the price.


Quibblicous

This is the same basic technology they used in the 1830s and even earlier to mass produce gunstocks for military rifles. Harper’s Ferry National Historic Site in West Virginia originally had an arms factory for rifles and they have a fully functional gunstock duplicator that’s pretty much identical to this.


Crocodilec4t

I'm seeing double, four propellers!


0hellow

Are there any 3 dimensional versions possible with linkages? I’ve been thinking about a device with a Dremel much like this, but with a mirrored handheld pen that isn’t motorized.


n1elkyfan

Something like this. https://woodgears.ca/pantograph/index.html


0hellow

That’s awesome. Pretty cool how they managed the dice I’ll have to draw up a sketch of what’s in my brain, but I’m starting to think there’s reasons mine doesn’t exist… Edit: sketch was useless lol. I just want something in between your link and the OP video. It would be manual like yours linked, but two cylinders spinning like the original, and tabletop sized, vertical like a potting wheel. You would manually rotate the podium with your object you want to copy, and follow in and out of the crevices with a wand(?). It’s complicated because you need a 2D pantograph I think, and it would need to be so rigid and tight, it probably wouldn’t be worth the effort.


n1elkyfan

I think I understand what your wanting. You want it to be a one to one copier?


0hellow

Essentially, although it would be pretty awesome if you could set the scales too like other pantographs. It would be cool to experiment with swapping the original mid copy, and end up with a multi headed beast or something?


BukkakedFrankenstein

Old deckel pantographs did that.


n1elkyfan

Something like this. https://woodgears.ca/pantograph/index.html


elvesunited

Ya but this makes no sense because, how was the first one made?


LimpCroissant

Some custom knife makers use these also to make their handles.


iMadrid11

I hear the Fender Custom Shop has a machine that can exactly copy the same dimensions of your guitar. I've never seen pictures of that machine.


richcournoyer

Cloning machine....Hahahaha..I guess it was a bad Google translation.