T O P
zihuatapulco

Oryx And Crake by Margaret Atwood and Fiskadoro, by Denis Johnson.


Tupac_Presley

Give {Tender is the Flesh} a whirl for your unsettling fix. {Little Eyes} isn’t necessarily dystopia, just plain Sci Fi, but has moments that set me on edge, not through horror but the reality of the situation.


AntleredRabbit

Came here to make sure Tender is the Flesh is mentioned, it is dystopian and unsettling and unresolving for SURE.


goodreads-bot

[**Tender is the Flesh**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/49090884-tender-is-the-flesh) ^(By: Agustina Bazterrica, Sarah Moses | 211 pages | Published: 2017 | Popular Shelves: horror, fiction, dystopian, dystopia, sci-fi) ^(This book has been suggested 23 times) [**Little Eyes**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48635845-little-eyes) ^(By: Samanta Schweblin, Megan McDowell | 256 pages | Published: 2018 | Popular Shelves: sci-fi, science-fiction, horror, translated, argentina) ^(This book has been suggested 1 time) *** ^(20149 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


johannacantsing

I finished Tender is the Flesh like two months ago and I haven't stopped thinking about it. Very intense and unsettling!


changethebritafilter

Absolutely agree with Tender is the Flesh! Just don’t make the mistake of reading it while eating lunch like I did…


anatomyofageochemist

Reading this now, definitely needed to be on this list. Glad to see you mention it.


allisonthepants

I definitely agree with tender is the flesh also


1au

{{The Orphan Master’s Son}} {{Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?}} Seconding the recommendations for The Giver - it’s indeed YA but I think goes far beyond typical expectations. Also seconding the recommendations for Never Let Me Go and The Road.


goodreads-bot

[**The Orphan Master's Son**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11529868-the-orphan-master-s-son) ^(By: Adam Johnson | 443 pages | Published: 2012 | Popular Shelves: fiction, book-club, historical-fiction, pulitzer, pulitzer-prize) >Pak Jun Do is the haunted son of a lost mother - a singer "stolen" to Pyongyang - and an influential father who runs Long Tomorrows, a work camp for orphans. There the boy is given his first taste of power, picking which orphans eat first and which will be lent out for manual labor. Recognized for his loyalty and keen instincts, Jun Do comes to the attention of superiors in the state, rises in the ranks, and starts on a road from which there will be no return. > >Considering himself "a humble citizen of the greatest nation in the world," Jun Do becomes a professional kidnapper who must navigate the shifting rules, arbitrary violence, and baffling demands of his Korean overlords in order to stay alive. Driven to the absolute limit of what any human being could endure, he boldly takes on the treacherous role of rival to Kim Jong Il in an attempt to save the woman he loves, Sun Moon, a legendary actress "so pure, she didn't know what starving people looked like." > >Part breathless thriller, part story of innocence lost, part story of romantic love, The Orphan Master's Son is also a riveting portrait of a world heretofore hidden from view: a North Korea rife with hunger, corruption, and casual cruelty but also camaraderie, stolen moments of beauty, and love. A towering literary achievement, The Orphan Master's Son ushers Adam Johnson into the small group of today's greatest writers. > >An epic novel and a thrilling literary discovery, The Orphan Master's Son follows a young man's journey through the icy waters, dark tunnels, and eerie spy chambers of the world's most mysterious dictatorship, North Korea. ^(This book has been suggested 1 time) [**Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36402034-do-androids-dream-of-electric-sheep) ^(By: Philip K. Dick | 258 pages | Published: 1968 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, classics, scifi) >It was January 2021, and Rick Deckard had a license to kill. >Somewhere among the hordes of humans out there, lurked several rogue androids. Deckard's assignment--find them and then..."retire" them. Trouble was, the androids all looked exactly like humans, and they didn't want to be found! ^(This book has been suggested 4 times) *** ^(20182 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


Ignore_Me-

Orphan masters son is so fucking good.


livhandsome

{{The Road}} will *not* give you a happy ending. It's beautiful though. {{Severance}} was also good and doesn't tie things up at the end at all. {{Never Let Me Go}} is very subtle but extremely unsettling--much more of a dystopia than a post-apocalyptic story. All of these are on the literary side of things as that's what I read the most of.


Sombrero_54

Somehow I had images stuck in my head from various descriptions from "The Road." It was pretty bleak and felt like it could actually happen.


StrongTxWoman

I love *The Road*. It is beautiful and hard to read at the same time. What's the author's beef with punctuation?


EGOtyst

It's pretentious and gimmicky, imo. He says that if it's written directly, you don't need it... Which is bs.


StrongTxWoman

Really? I just like how beautifully it is written. The plot is very simple, but, by gosh, it is so gorgeously crafted. I don't miss those extra punctuations.


eperszezon

currently reading never let me go and i find it really enjoyable so far! i’m very fond of the subtle, underlying unsettling feeling of it.


Merkhaba

What 'Severance'?


joannaradok

It’s by Ling Ma, I’m not OP but I’m reading it at present.


tueniwan

This: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Severance_(novel)


plantsarecool222

Thank you!!! 🙏


livhandsome

Hope you find something that scratches the itch!


goodreads-bot

[**The Road**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6288.The_Road) ^(By: Cormac McCarthy | 241 pages | Published: 2006 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, dystopia, dystopian, post-apocalyptic) >A searing, postapocalyptic novel destined to become Cormac McCarthy’s masterpiece. > >A father and his son walk alone through burned America. Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark. Their destination is the coast, although they don’t know what, if anything, awaits them there. They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food—and each other. > >The Road is the profoundly moving story of a journey. It boldly imagines a future in which no hope remains, but in which the father and his son, “each the other’s world entire,” are sustained by love. Awesome in the totality of its vision, it is an unflinching meditation on the worst and the best that we are capable of: ultimate destructiveness, desperate tenacity, and the tenderness that keeps two people alive in the face of total devastation. ^(This book has been suggested 16 times) [**Severance**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36348525-severance) ^(By: Ling Ma | 291 pages | Published: 2018 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, sci-fi, dystopian, dystopia) >Candace Chen, a millennial drone self-sequestered in a Manhattan office tower, is devoted to routine. So she barely notices when a plague of biblical proportions sweeps New York. Then Shen Fever spreads. Families flee. Companies halt operations. The subways squeak to a halt. Soon entirely alone, still unfevered, she photographs the eerie, abandoned city as the anonymous blogger NY Ghost. > >Candace won’t be able to make it on her own forever, though. Enter a group of survivors, led by the power-hungry IT tech Bob. They’re traveling to a place called the Facility, where, Bob promises, they will have everything they need to start society anew. But Candace is carrying a secret she knows Bob will exploit. Should she escape from her rescuers? > >A send-up and takedown of the rituals, routines, and missed opportunities of contemporary life, Ling Ma’s Severance is a quirky coming-of-adulthood tale and satire. ^(This book has been suggested 8 times) [**Never Let Me Go**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6334.Never_Let_Me_Go) ^(By: Kazuo Ishiguro | 288 pages | Published: 2005 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, sci-fi, dystopia, dystopian) >Hailsham seems like a pleasant English boarding school, far from the influences of the city. Its students are well tended and supported, trained in art and literature, and become just the sort of people the world wants them to be. But, curiously, they are taught nothing of the outside world and are allowed little contact with it. > >Within the grounds of Hailsham, Kathy grows from schoolgirl to young woman, but it’s only when she and her friends Ruth and Tommy leave the safe grounds of the school (as they always knew they would) that they realize the full truth of what Hailsham is. > >Never Let Me Go breaks through the boundaries of the literary novel. It is a gripping mystery, a beautiful love story, and also a scathing critique of human arrogance and a moral examination of how we treat the vulnerable and different in our society. In exploring the themes of memory and the impact of the past, Ishiguro takes on the idea of a possible future to create his most moving and powerful book to date. ^(This book has been suggested 26 times) *** ^(20096 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


2beagles

I can't believe this wasn't the first response: Parable of the Sower and Parable of the Talents by Octavia Butler. They fit exactly your criteria, minus the time travel. They are brutal. Kindred by her and The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead are also good fits. Stuff happens at the end of the Underground Railroad that had me waking up weeping for a couple of days after. And that's in addition to everything else. Kindred, though, Kindred is the book for you. Time travel is central. It's less fantastical dystopian rather than unflinching about the realities of chattel slavery in the US, which was pure dystopia.


Lady_PANdemonium_

I freaking love everything Octavia Butler writes


PricklyRubus

I had to scroll too far to find Parable of the Sower- fits it perfect. Came here to recommend Butlers work.


eritain

I'm reading it a second time now, and it ... **wow** does it hit. If Kindred is an unflinching historical dystopia, the Parables are an *entirely too damn plausible mid-2020s one.* Creeps me out worse than Fahrenheit 451. The edition of Parable of the Sower I'm reading has the disadvantage of truly terrible proofreading, and the advantage of a foreword by N. K. Jemisin, which leads me to mention her Broken Earth trilogy, starting with {The Fifth Season}. Jemisin's Broken Earth dystopian setting is more fantastic than Butler's in these books, but its dystopian psychology is profoundly true-to-life.


michelle_atl

I just finished Sower and now on Talents. Unbelievable how close to modern day they are.


Queen_of_Chloe

I read them last year and checked the copyright date more than once each book. I just could not believe they were written pre-2016.


michelle_atl

Same here! I was like is someone messing with me? Lol


jlhll

Just wait until the quotes from the presidential candidate pop up.


goodreads-bot

[**The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth, #1)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19161852-the-fifth-season) ^(By: N.K. Jemisin | 468 pages | Published: 2015 | Popular Shelves: fantasy, fiction, sci-fi, science-fiction, owned) >This is the way the world ends. Again. > >Three terrible things happen in a single day. Essun, a woman living an ordinary life in a small town, comes home to find that her husband has brutally murdered their son and kidnapped their daughter. Meanwhile, mighty Sanze -- the world-spanning empire whose innovations have been civilization's bedrock for a thousand years -- collapses as most of its citizens are murdered to serve a madman's vengeance. And worst of all, across the heart of the vast continent known as the Stillness, a great red rift has been torn into the heart of the earth, spewing ash enough to darken the sky for years. Or centuries. > >Now Essun must pursue the wreckage of her family through a deadly, dying land. Without sunlight, clean water, or arable land, and with limited stockpiles of supplies, there will be war all across the Stillness: a battle royale of nations not for power or territory, but simply for the basic resources necessary to get through the long dark night. Essun does not care if the world falls apart around her. She'll break it herself, if she must, to save her daughter. > > >original cover of ISBN 0316229296/9780316229296 ^(This book has been suggested 19 times) *** ^(20274 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


SoTotallyUnqualified

Reading these now and they are so unsettling


googier526

Thank the gods someone said it... This should be the top response!


CMarlowe

If you like King and 11.22.63, check out The Stand. Definitely dystopian. Definitely dark. King is a bit hit or miss with his endings, but I think with the exception of an overly-long epilogue that’s not really called that, the ending was quite good. The Running Man is very dark, and very dystopian. About the only thing it shares in common with the Schwarzenegger film is both future a show called The Running Man. King wrote it under the name Richard Bachmann. If you like depressing endings, you’ll like this. The Long Walk—also by Bachman, also set in a dystopian future—is about a contest, where kids partake in a compete to see who can walk the furthest. If you collapse and can’t walk any further you “get your ticket punched.” Despite being about, well, walking, it’s full of action and interesting characters. It’s very much a page-turner. If you like dark, depressing endings, you’ll absolutely love The Long Walk.


twitchaprompter

I read The Long Walk over 15 years ago, and the ending STILL haunts me.


plantsarecool222

Wanted to give an update that I started The Long Walk last night and had to force myself to stop to be able to get some sleep! I'm excited to really get into it today 😊


ManAze5447

The Long Walk is the first thing I thought of


pretty-ok-username

I second these recommendations! The Stand is one of my favourite King books, and I couldn’t put The Long Walk down (very disturbing)!


Averill0

Perdido Street Station by China Mieville. It's got really cool fantasy/steampunk worldbuilding, and everything is *terrible.* Everything is super fucked up and godawful and the government is simply going to kill the heroes before they can do anything heroic, even the protagonists are varying degrees of shitty people, and the ending is really just bitter instead of bittersweet. The monster is *so* cool, and I've absolutely lifted ideas from it for my D&D games.


monsterosaleviosa

Not to mention The Weaver, who might be one of my favorite…beings? I’ve come across.


Averill0

THE WEAVER IS MY FAVE I'M GENUINELY CONSIDERING GETTING A WEAVER TATTOO


kommanderkush201

You beat me to it


[deleted]

Yes, this one, OP. And its sequel The Scar.


jess0amae

I found a copy of this book and I am going to read it now. It sounds really good.


DisastrousNewspaper5

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley


snekkk123

Came here to say this


AbbyNem

1984. The Road.


jlhll

1984 is the original in this category!


JustaMe610

Parable of the Sower-Octavia Butler


mooseyjuice

Battle Royale by Koushun Takami. Truly disturbing.


larkharrow

Scrolled down to make sure this was recommended. BR is a cult classic!


SaintUlvemann

*We* by Yevgeny Zamyatin. Written in 1924 by a Russian author. First published in English translation, original Russian text not published until 1952, and publication within Russia was delayed until 1988 for reasons you can probably guess. It's one of the original novels that essentially invented dystopia as a genre, so, it will absolutely stay away from that YA feel.


BlackthornWinter

{We} is a great book! A friend of mine told me it was the inspiration for Orwell’s 1984, but that may be apocryphal.


BlackthornWinter

{{We}} is a great book! A friend of mine told me it was the inspiration for Orwell’s 1984, but that may be apocryphal.


cherrybounce

Older but “Earth Abides.”


OrchidExact7541

Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel The Passage Trilogy by Justin Cronin


Fyrefly1981

{{The Windup Girl}}


goodreads-bot

[**The Windup Girl**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6597651-the-windup-girl) ^(By: Paolo Bacigalupi | 359 pages | Published: 2009 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, dystopia, dystopian) >Anderson Lake is a company man, AgriGen's Calorie Man in Thailand. Under cover as a factory manager, Anderson combs Bangkok's street markets in search of foodstuffs thought to be extinct, hoping to reap the bounty of history's lost calories. There, he encounters Emiko... > >Emiko is the Windup Girl, a strange and beautiful creature. One of the New People, Emiko is not human; instead, she is an engineered being, creche-grown and programmed to satisfy the decadent whims of a Kyoto businessman, but now abandoned to the streets of Bangkok. Regarded as soulless beings by some, devils by others, New People are slaves, soldiers, and toys of the rich in a chilling near future in which calorie companies rule the world, the oil age has passed, and the side effects of bio-engineered plagues run rampant across the globe. > >What Happens when calories become currency? What happens when bio-terrorism becomes a tool for corporate profits, when said bio-terrorism's genetic drift forces mankind to the cusp of post-human evolution? Award-winning author Paolo Bacigalupi delivers one of the most highly acclaimed science fiction novels of the twenty-first century. ^(This book has been suggested 8 times) *** ^(20141 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


andwhenwefall

I loved this book. Also, {{The Water Knife}} by the same author.


goodreads-bot

[**The Water Knife**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23209924-the-water-knife) ^(By: Paolo Bacigalupi | 371 pages | Published: 2015 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, fiction, sci-fi, dystopia, dystopian) >In a future hammered by climate change and drought, mountain snows have turned to rain, and rain evaporates before it hits the ground. In a fragmenting United States, the cities of Phoenix and Las Vegas skirmish for a dwindling share of the Colorado River. But it is the Las Vegas water knives - assassins, terrorists and spies - who are legendary for protecting Las Vegas' water supplies, and for ensuring Phoenix's ruin. > >When rumours of a game-changing water source surface, Las Vegas dispatches elite water knife Angel Velasquez to Phoenix to investigate. There, he discovers hardened journalist Lucy Monroe, who holds the secret to the water source Angel seeks. But Angel isn't the only one hunting for water, Lucy is no pushover, and the death of a despised water knife is a small price to pay in return for the life-giving flow of a river. ^(This book has been suggested 3 times) *** ^(20407 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


onionsforthepoor

{{Oryx and Crake}} is an all time favorite of mine. It's bizarre, often depressing, and realistic in a disturbing way. Amazing worldbuilding, a fairly plausible apocalypse, and gorgeous writing. Just thinking about it is making me want to do a reread.


goodreads-bot

[**Oryx and Crake (MaddAddam, #1)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/46756.Oryx_and_Crake) ^(By: Margaret Atwood, Kristiina Drews | 389 pages | Published: 2003 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, sci-fi, dystopia, dystopian) >Oryx and Crake is at once an unforgettable love story and a compelling vision of the future. Snowman, known as Jimmy before mankind was overwhelmed by a plague, is struggling to survive in a world where he may be the last human, and mourning the loss of his best friend, Crake, and the beautiful and elusive Oryx whom they both loved. In search of answers, Snowman embarks on a journey–with the help of the green-eyed Children of Crake–through the lush wilderness that was so recently a great city, until powerful corporations took mankind on an uncontrolled genetic engineering ride. Margaret Atwood projects us into a near future that is both all too familiar and beyond our imagining. ^(This book has been suggested 16 times) *** ^(20169 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


Arrowkane

I’d recommend scythe by Neal Shustermen


Mr_Mons_of_Nibiru

There's an amazing book out there called "Barefoot In The Head" by Brian Aldiss. It's about a journey a young man takes through Europe in the aftermath of a world war where all the countries of the world dropped aerosolized LSD bombs on each other. Forever drenching the world in a layer of residual acid. The protagonist slowly goes insane. The author himself was dosing progressively heavier doses of acid as he was writing the book as well. As the book drags on, the language starts breaking down and is almost unreadable by the end. But if you can hang with it, it's really beautiful. But your brain will hurt. Fantastic and criminally undersung work.


PaperKatla

Man, that sounds fascinating. I wanna read this.


zadie504

{{children of men}}


jlhll

This has some hope at the end. But I loved the movie. The book it was based on really tied the whole thing up with a bow at the end. Up until the last few chapters the book was great. But the “everything is fixed now” ending was so bad.


puppies_and_unicorns

The Silo series by Hugh Howey {{Wool}}


goodreads-bot

[**Wool (Wool, #1)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12287209-wool) ^(By: Hugh Howey | 58 pages | Published: 2011 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, dystopian, dystopia) >Thousands of them have lived underground. They've lived there so long, there are only legends about people living anywhere else. Such a life requires rules. Strict rules. There are things that must not be discussed. Like going outside. Never mention you might like going outside. > >Or you'll get what you wish for. ^(This book has been suggested 9 times) *** ^(20392 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


julesdottxt

The Handmaid's Tale.


plantsarecool222

I've been meaning to finally read this so thank you for the reminder! 😊


AntleredRabbit

I finished Tender is the Flesh yesterday, and then started Handmaids Tale 😬 I’m uncomfortable from both. I will need a brain-clean after I’m done with Handmaids Tale 😂


julesdottxt

Awesome. Very relevant book too and also very eye opening. Heard good things about the sequel (The testaments) but I'm not tryna get depressed this summer. It's on my list tho.


opossume

In the same vein, {{Future Home of the Living God}} absolutely blew me away and frightened me. I preferred it to Handmaid’s Tale, although preferred in this case means was more disturbed by..


goodreads-bot

[**Future Home of the Living God**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34217599-future-home-of-the-living-god) ^(By: Louise Erdrich | 263 pages | Published: 2017 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, dystopian, dystopia, sci-fi) >Louise Erdrich paints a startling portrait of a young woman fighting for her life and her unborn child against oppressive forces that manifest in the wake of a cataclysmic event in this dystopian novel. Twenty-six-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, adopted daughter of a pair of Minneapolis liberals, is as disturbed and uncertain as the rest of America around her. But for Cedar, this change is profound and deeply personal. She is four months pregnant. > >Though she wants to tell the adoptive parents who raised her from infancy, Cedar first feels compelled to find her birth mother, Mary Potts, an Ojibwe to understand both her and her baby’s origins. As Cedar goes back to her own biological beginnings, society around her begins to disintegrate, fueled by a swelling panic about the end of humanity. ^(This book has been suggested 4 times) *** ^(20345 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


Artashata

Blood Meridian. I'm reading it rn and it's full of viciousness and unrelenting violence. A novel about genocide. I know you're probably only looking for fiction, but the most disturbing book I can recommend is about the Einsatzgruppen during WWII. The book is called Masters of Death and the author is Richard Rhodes. The mobile killing squads ran around the eastern front shooting Jews and others into pits. It's so horrible.


howigotothewoods

Station eleven is about an apocalyptic virus but it has the vibes you’re looking for !


minetmine

Unwind. The Second Civil War was fought over reproductive rights. The chilling resolution: Life is inviolable from the moment of conception until age thirteen. Between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, however, parents can have their child "unwound," whereby all of the child's organs are transplanted into different donors, so life doesn't technically end. Connor is too difficult for his parents to control. Risa, a ward of the state, is not enough to be kept alive. And Lev is a tithe, a child conceived and raised to be unwound. Together, they may have a chance to escape and to survive.


the-willow-witch

Came here to say this. It’s the most disturbing book I’ve ever read.


spiky_odradek

This sounds terrifying


kgrandia

The Library at Mount Char. Messed up entertainment at its finest. Very unsettling. Doesn’t end well for anyone. Not predictable.


MortarMaggot275

The Road


chookie-3571

A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller


justagirl756

The School for Good Mothers


Apple2Day

Metro 2033


Bethyi

Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood is my favourite book of all time and is the first thing I thought of when I read the title. I also strongly reccomend The Giver by Lois Lowry and The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness


Princessdreaaaa

The Man in the High Castle by Phillip Dick. Dark Matter by Blake Crouch.


CLE_hobbit

Seconding Dark Matter, and Recursion, both by Blake Crouch.


bearjew64

Check out Replay by Ken Grimwood


throw_998

{{Animal Farm}}


goodreads-bot

[**Animal Farm**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/170448.Animal_Farm) ^(By: George Orwell, Russell Baker, C.M. Woodhouse | 141 pages | Published: 1945 | Popular Shelves: classics, fiction, classic, owned, dystopia) >Librarian's note: There is an Alternate Cover Edition for this edition of this book here. > >A farm is taken over by its overworked, mistreated animals. With flaming idealism and stirring slogans, they set out to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality. Thus the stage is set for one of the most telling satiric fables ever penned –a razor-edged fairy tale for grown-ups that records the evolution from revolution against tyranny to a totalitarianism just as terrible. >When Animal Farm was first published, Stalinist Russia was seen as its target. Today it is devastatingly clear that wherever and whenever freedom is attacked, under whatever banner, the cutting clarity and savage comedy of George Orwell’s masterpiece have a meaning and message still ferociously fresh. ^(This book has been suggested 5 times) *** ^(20215 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


andracute2

Unwind by Neal Shusterman


jonnyprophet

Haven't seen {{Childhood's End}} by Arthur C Clarke. It's the dystopian future we want but can't justify... And then gets eerie. Or the {{Revelation Space}} books by Alistair Reynolds. Great world building. Great grim future sense... But the wolves are coming.


goodreads-bot

[**Childhood's End**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/414999.Childhood_s_End) ^(By: Arthur C. Clarke | 224 pages | Published: 1953 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, scifi, classics) >The Overlords appeared suddenly over every city--intellectually, technologically, and militarily superior to humankind. Benevolent, they made few demands: unify earth, eliminate poverty, and end war. With little rebellion, humankind agreed, and a golden age began. > >But at what cost? With the advent of peace, man ceases to strive for creative greatness, and a malaise settles over the human race. To those who resist, it becomes evident that the Overlords have an agenda of their own. As civilization approaches the crossroads, will the Overlords spell the end for humankind . . . or the beginning? ^(This book has been suggested 2 times) [**Revelation Space (Revelation Space, #1)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/89187.Revelation_Space) ^(By: Alastair Reynolds | 585 pages | Published: 2000 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, scifi, space-opera) >Nine hundred thousand years ago, something annihilated the Amarantin civilization just as it was on the verge of discovering space flight. Now one scientist, Dan Sylveste, will stop at nothing to solve the Amarantin riddle before ancient history repeats itself. With no other resources at his disposal, Sylveste forges a dangerous alliance with the cyborg crew of the starship Nostalgia for Infinity. But as he closes in on the secret, a killer closes in on him. Because the Amarantin were destroyed for a reason — and if that reason is uncovered, the universe—and reality itself — could be irrecoverably altered…. ^(This book has been suggested 8 times) *** ^(20278 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


jonnyprophet

Good bot


cosmicUnicorn42

On the beach - slow burn and not for everyone but worth a try for something different. Just a heads-up though, it was written in the 50s and some of it is'of the time' and a bit offensive on re-reading today


happihibiscus

The School for Good Mothers. Very subtly dystopian and deals with the very pressing issue of the rights of mothers and their children.


Kalexis29

1984 by George Orwell depressed me for a little while after I finished. Drawing all the parallels from our world, comparing, it’s very hard to ignore!


Lil_Curt

Oryx and crake


Leonashanana

Recursion by Blake Crouch. Not a perfect example, because it does feature a romantic resolution where everything is fixed... but thankfully this is all confined to the epilogue, so if you skip the very end, you'll get the full whammy.


c3clark1

I know that you said no YA and you were looking for something dark, so this may not be what you are looking for, but if you have never read The Giver, you may want to give it a shot.


Goronman16

Oryx and crake was a fantastic one for this. Logical, unsettling, in many ways believable.


reneemcsquared

The entire trilogy was excellent and thought provoking and definitely unsettling.


Lady_PANdemonium_

I took an apocalyptic lit class cause I love these kinds of books The road like everyone said, I’ve read it like three times PARABLE OF THE SOWER BY OCTAVIA BUTLER Severance by Ling Ma Oryx and Crake by Margret Atwood


[deleted]

{{I who have never known men}} {{the memory police}} {{the doloriad}} if you want something very claustrophobic and bleak. {{book of the unnamed midwife}} (it's a series but I wish I'd only read book one) Strongly second Never Let Me Go, Parable of the Sower, Tender is the Flesh, all the Phillip K Dick books mentioned, Oryx +Crake/MaddAddam series (book two was my fave), station eleven, The Underground Railroad by whitehead, and The Stand.


vampirenerd

{{Never Let Me Go}} was disturbing in a way that made me want to know everything about the world. Kazuo Ishiguro's storytelling in this book is amazing. {{The Long Walk}} absolutely fits what you want. It's been a long time since I read The Long Walk but I remember crying near the end.


goodreads-bot

[**Never Let Me Go**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6334.Never_Let_Me_Go) ^(By: Kazuo Ishiguro | 288 pages | Published: 2005 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, sci-fi, dystopia, dystopian) >Hailsham seems like a pleasant English boarding school, far from the influences of the city. Its students are well tended and supported, trained in art and literature, and become just the sort of people the world wants them to be. But, curiously, they are taught nothing of the outside world and are allowed little contact with it. > >Within the grounds of Hailsham, Kathy grows from schoolgirl to young woman, but it’s only when she and her friends Ruth and Tommy leave the safe grounds of the school (as they always knew they would) that they realize the full truth of what Hailsham is. > >Never Let Me Go breaks through the boundaries of the literary novel. It is a gripping mystery, a beautiful love story, and also a scathing critique of human arrogance and a moral examination of how we treat the vulnerable and different in our society. In exploring the themes of memory and the impact of the past, Ishiguro takes on the idea of a possible future to create his most moving and powerful book to date. ^(This book has been suggested 27 times) [**The Long Walk**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9014.The_Long_Walk) ^(By: Richard Bachman, Stephen King | 370 pages | Published: 1979 | Popular Shelves: horror, stephen-king, fiction, dystopia, dystopian) >On the first day of May, 100 teenage boys meet for an event known throughout the country as The Long Walk. If you break the rules, you get three warnings. If you exceed your limit, what happens is absolutely terrifying. Reissue. ^(This book has been suggested 5 times) *** ^(20237 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


glacialaftermath

{{Manhunt}} fits this category quite nicely! Edit: not that one! The 2022 horror novel by Gretchen Felker Martin!


goodreads-bot

[**Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/146274.Manhunt) ^(By: James L. Swanson | 388 pages | Published: 2006 | Popular Shelves: history, non-fiction, nonfiction, civil-war, true-crime) >A fascinating tale of murder, intrigue, and betrayal. A gripping hour-by-hour account told through the eyes of the hunted and the hunters, this is history as you've never read it before. > >The murder of Abraham Lincoln set off the greatest manhunt in American history -- the pursuit and capture of John Wilkes Booth. From April 14 to April 26, 1865, the assassin led Union cavalry and detectives on a wild twelve-day chase through the streets of Washington, D.C., across the swamps of Maryland, and into the forests of Virginia, while the nation, still reeling from the just-ended Civil War, watched in horror and sadness. > >At the very center of this story is John Wilkes Booth, America's notorious villain. A Confederate sympathizer and a member of a celebrated acting family, Booth threw away his fame and wealth for a chance to avenge the South's defeat. For almost two weeks, he confounded the manhunters, slipping away from their every move and denying them the justice they sought. > >Based on rare archival materials, obscure trial transcripts, and Lincoln's own blood relics, Manhunt is a fully documented work and a fascinating tale of murder, intrigue, and betrayal. A gripping hour-by-hour account told through the eyes of the hunted and the hunters, this is history as you've never read it before. ^(This book has been suggested 1 time) *** ^(20132 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


p-u-n-k_girl

It was way too gruesome for me, but this was gonna be my suggestion too. Eventually maybe I'll try it again


SandMan3914

Anthony Burgess -- The Wanting Seed


Wakethefckup

The jungle by Sinclair….esp if u live in USA right now


nogodsnomanagers3

The Diamond Age: Or, A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer


tinza

Animal Farm goes from cute to disturbing quite quickly


Calm-Substance-8185

Parable of the Sower


Flow3r-zahra

The broken earth trilogy ¯\_(ツ)_/¯


curiouskit10

{{More Than This by Patrick Ness}} is just absolutely miserable


goodreads-bot

[**More Than This**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/21969786-more-than-this) ^(By: Patrick Ness | 480 pages | Published: 2013 | Popular Shelves: young-adult, sci-fi, ya, science-fiction, lgbt) >A boy drowns, desperate and alone in his final moments. He dies. Then he wakes, naked and bruised and thirsty, but alive. How can this be? And what is this strange deserted place? > >As he struggles to understand what is happening, the boy dares to hope. Might this not be the end? Might there be more to this life, or perhaps this afterlife? > >From multi-award-winning Patrick Ness comes one of the most provocative and moving novels of our time. ^(This book has been suggested 3 times) *** ^(20328 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


Ants46

Unwind One particular part fucked me up so badly, I still get random thoughts about it popping into my head years later. So very chilling.


RagsMaloney

{{The Plot Against America}}


pomegranate_

This right here is it, best historical fiction I have read and checks a lot of OPs boxes.


goodreads-bot

[**The Plot Against America**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/703.The_Plot_Against_America) ^(By: Philip Roth | 391 pages | Published: 2004 | Popular Shelves: fiction, historical-fiction, alternate-history, owned, 1001-books) >In an astonishing feat of narrative invention, our most ambitious novelist imagines an alternate version of American history. In 1940 Charles A. Lindbergh, heroic aviator and rabid isolationist, is elected President. Shortly thereafter, he negotiates a cordial "understanding" with Adolf Hitler, while the new government embarks on a program of folksy anti-Semitism. > >For one boy growing up in Newark, Lindbergh's election is the first in a series of ruptures that threatens to destroy his small, safe corner of America - and with it, his mother, his father, and his older brother. >(back cover) ^(This book has been suggested 1 time) *** ^(20361 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


Grzechoooo

1984 by George Orwell.


owheelj

I just finished reading The Gold Coast by Kim Stanley Robinson, and it's by far the most realistic and believably going to be our future dystopia that I have read. Actually it just felt like reality.


jrodwell1013

The End of Eternity by Isaac Asimov. Greatest book I ever read and not super long.


upstairsbeforedark

Tender is the Flesh by Agustina Bazterrica


montygreen18

Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer More sci fi but pretty dark and disturbing. Full disclosure: i watched the movie but it was based on the book series and fits your request.


SoTotallyUnqualified

Blindness by Jose Saramago is the most unsettling dystopian novel I’ve ever read.


goddess-of-direction

Have you tried Neal Stephenson? There is usually a satisfying conclusion, but bad guys don't always lose and there's almost a thousand pages of disturbing situations along the way...


gw3nj4n

Someone has suggested it already I believe but it deserves more attention so my recommendation is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Philip K. Dick, it’s one of my favourite books of all time and I read it all in a day when I was in the middle of my A Levels, I really love this book lol


nostradamuswasright

I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream is a short story, but it's my favorite dystopia.


Dhes_

Unwind by Neal Shusterman or Wicked by Gregory McGuire… certainly no happy ending in the latter 😬


Yessie4242

The Poppy War by RF Kuang. It may feel slightly YA for the first 100 pages or so, but it quickly loses it


skydaddy8585

Everworld. Definitely a YA series but plenty of dark disturbing stuff. Racism, one character has severe OCD that affects a lot of his story, nazi/skinhead group that causes havoc, and various gods and goddesses from various mythologies worldwide that are varying levels of ok to evil. Not a dystopian series per se but an alternate history/alternate reality timeline yes. All the gods of the ancients took their main followers and created a new reality separate from the regular one to go and keep doing what they do.


allisonthepants

Yes! These came out before Wikipedia was a thing so they never got finished 🥲 but they are SO good!!!


IlliterateCuck

The Dark Tower Series by Stephen King


Flipitah

Dark Matter is the BEST! Blake Crouch for ya <3


A1Protocol

The Vice Versa Series by Andre Soares. Time travel. Political elements. Mature characterization. It's speculative fiction in Eastern Africa and another planetary system.


ugagradlady

Clocks That Don't Tick The Drifting Classroom


Katamariguy

Fear, Loathing, and Gumbo on the Campaign Trail '72 by Drew is a story of American politics that feels disturbingly familiar in 2022


mellowmem

I'd say Bunny by Mona Awad was unsettling. And bizzare lol. Kinda cultish


graipape

Not exactly what you're asking for, but Ursula K LeGuin's {{The Dispossessed}}


goodreads-bot

[**The Dispossessed (Hainish Cycle, #6)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13651.The_Dispossessed) ^(By: Ursula K. Le Guin | 387 pages | Published: 1974 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, scifi, fantasy) >Librarian note: Alternate cover edition of ISBN 9780061054884. > >Shevek, a brilliant physicist, decides to take action. He will seek answers, question the unquestionable, and attempt to tear down the walls of hatred that have isolated his planet of anarchists from the rest of the civilized universe. To do this dangerous task will mean giving up his family and possibly his life—Shevek must make the unprecedented journey to the utopian mother planet, Urras, to challenge the complex structures of life and living, and ignite the fires of change. ^(This book has been suggested 5 times) *** ^(20214 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


lookwhoshere0

{{Gormenghast Trilogy}}


goodreads-bot

[**Gormenghast (Gormenghast Trilogy, #2)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11282431-gormenghast) ^(By: Mervyn Peake | 511 pages | Published: 1950 | Popular Shelves: fantasy, fiction, classics, gothic, owned) >1977 edition, shares ISBN 0140028900 with other editions. ^(This book has been suggested 1 time) *** ^(20228 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


PaperKatla

{{Tender is the Flesh}} by Agustina Bazterrica


goodreads-bot

[**Tender is the Flesh**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/49090884-tender-is-the-flesh) ^(By: Agustina Bazterrica, Sarah Moses | 211 pages | Published: 2017 | Popular Shelves: horror, fiction, dystopian, dystopia, sci-fi) >Working at the local processing plant, Marcos is in the business of slaughtering humans —though no one calls them that anymore. > >His wife has left him, his father is sinking into dementia, and Marcos tries not to think too hard about how he makes a living. After all, it happened so quickly. First, it was reported that an infectious virus has made all animal meat poisonous to humans. Then governments initiated the “Transition.” Now, eating human meat—“special meat”—is legal. Marcos tries to stick to numbers, consignments, processing. > >Then one day he’s given a gift: a live specimen of the finest quality. Though he’s aware that any form of personal contact is forbidden on pain of death, little by little he starts to treat her like a human being. And soon, he becomes tortured by what has been lost—and what might still be saved. ^(This book has been suggested 24 times) *** ^(20238 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


[deleted]

Oryx and Crake series by Margaret Atwood. So amazing.


dwooding1

{{Zone One}} by Colson Whitehead.


goodreads-bot

[**Zone One**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10365343-zone-one) ^(By: Colson Whitehead | 259 pages | Published: 2011 | Popular Shelves: fiction, horror, zombies, science-fiction, post-apocalyptic) >In this wry take on the post-apocalyptic horror novel, a pandemic has devastated the planet. The plague has sorted humanity into two types: the uninfected and the infected, the living and the living dead. > >Now the plague is receding, and Americans are busy rebuild­ing civilization under orders from the provisional govern­ment based in Buffalo. Their top mission: the resettlement of Manhattan. Armed forces have successfully reclaimed the island south of Canal Street—aka Zone One—but pockets of plague-ridden squatters remain. While the army has eliminated the most dangerous of the infected, teams of civilian volunteers are tasked with clearing out a more innocuous variety—the “malfunctioning” stragglers, who exist in a catatonic state, transfixed by their former lives. > >Mark Spitz is a member of one of the civilian teams work­ing in lower Manhattan. Alternating between flashbacks of Spitz’s desperate fight for survival during the worst of the outbreak and his present narrative, the novel unfolds over three surreal days, as it depicts the mundane mission of straggler removal, the rigors of Post-Apocalyptic Stress Disorder, and the impossible job of coming to grips with the fallen world. > >And then things start to go wrong. > >Both spine chilling and playfully cerebral, Zone One bril­liantly subverts the genre’s conventions and deconstructs the zombie myth for the twenty-first century. ^(This book has been suggested 3 times) *** ^(20255 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


wastedspacepilot

Hellmouth by Giles Kristian There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor's Baby: scary fairy tales by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya


leaving4lyra

A book called Eleander Morning I read years ago was good. It was about a woman going back in time to kill hitler and then coming back to a future with the consequences of changing the past like that. Very good book.


morit77wag

1984 by Orwell Ahhh I love this book.


halfharte

Tender is the Flesh


coffeeclichehere

{{Klara and the Sun}} is soft and pretty subtle, but it fits this description


goodreads-bot

[**Klara and the Sun**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/54120408-klara-and-the-sun) ^(By: Kazuo Ishiguro | 303 pages | Published: 2021 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, sci-fi, book-club, audiobook) >From the best-selling author of Never Let Me Go and The Remains of the Day, a stunning new novel—his first since winning the Nobel Prize in Literature—about the wondrous, mysterious nature of the human heart. > >From her place in the store, Klara, an Artificial Friend with outstanding observational qualities, watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass on the street outside. She remains hopeful that a customer will soon choose her, but when the possibility emerges that her circumstances may change forever, Klara is warned not to invest too much in the promises of humans. > >In Klara and the Sun, Kazuo Ishiguro looks at our rapidly changing modern world through the eyes of an unforgettable narrator to explore a fundamental question: what does it mean to love? ^(This book has been suggested 9 times) *** ^(20316 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


shandogstorm

The Handmaids Tale. Although it’s becoming less and less of an alternate reality. The Man in the High Castle is good too.


papercranium

{{The School for Good Mothers}}


goodreads-bot

[**The School for Good Mothers**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/57846320-the-school-for-good-mothers) ^(By: Jessamine Chan | 336 pages | Published: 2022 | Popular Shelves: fiction, dystopian, 2022-releases, dystopia, dnf) >An alternate cover edition of ISBN 9781982156121 can be found here. > >In this taut and explosive debut novel, one lapse in judgement lands a young mother in a government reform program where custody of her child hangs in the balance. > >Frida Liu is struggling. She doesn’t have a career worthy of her Chinese immigrant parents’ sacrifices. What’s worse is she can’t persuade her husband, Gust, to give up his wellness-obsessed younger mistress. Only with their angelic daughter Harriet does Frida finally feel she’s attained the perfection expected of her. Harriet may be all she has, but she’s just enough. > >Until Frida has a horrible day. > >The state has its eyes on mothers like Frida — ones who check their phones while their kids are on the playground; who let their children walk home alone; in other words, mothers who only have one lapse of judgement. Now, a host of government officials will determine if Frida is a candidate for a Big Brother-like institution that measures the success or failure of a mother’s devotion. Faced with the possibility of losing Harriet, Frida must prove that she can live up to the standards set for mothers — that she can learn to be good. > >This propulsive, witty page-turner explores the perils of “perfect” upper-middle-class parenting, the violence enacted upon women by the state and each other, and the boundless love a mother has for her daughter. ^(This book has been suggested 8 times) *** ^(20317 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


[deleted]

[удалено]


goodreads-bot

[**Beyond The Golden Gate: A Pioneer Woman's Journey From California's Gold Country To Oregon's Fertile Tillamook Valley**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/322575.Beyond_The_Golden_Gate) ^(By: Gayle Tow | ? pages | Published: ? | Popular Shelves: ) ^(This book has been suggested 1 time) *** ^(20320 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


Katiekat27

{{The Gate to Women's Country}} is wonderful, thought-provoking, and intense. Also, perfect for current events.


goodreads-bot

[**The Gate to Women's Country**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/104344.The_Gate_to_Women_s_Country) ^(By: Sheri S. Tepper | 315 pages | Published: 1987 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, fantasy, dystopia) >Tepper's finest novel to date is set in a post-holocaust feminist dystopia that offers only two political alternatives: a repressive polygamist sect that is slowly self-destructing through inbreeding and the matriarchal dictatorship called Women's Country. Here, in a desperate effort to prevent another world war, the women have segregated most men into closed military garrisons and have taken on themselves every other function of government, industry, agriculture, science and learning. > >The resulting manifold responsibilities are seen through the life of Stavia, from a dreaming 10-year-old to maturity as doctor, mother and member of the Marthatown Women's Council. As in Tepper's Awakeners series books, the rigid social systems are tempered by the voices of individual experience and, here, by an imaginative reworking of The Trojan Woman that runs through the text. A rewarding and challenging novel that is to be valued for its provocative ideas. ^(This book has been suggested 4 times) *** ^(20321 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


alycorr

- The MaddAdam trilogy by Margaret Atwood: {{Oryx and Crake}}, {{The Year of the Flood}}, and {{MaddAdam}} - {{The Children of Men}} by P.D. James - {{Blindness}} by José Saramago - {{Zone One}} by Colson Whitehead - {{Station Eleven}} by Emily St. John Mandel


Sector_Independent

Parable of the seed/sower


Market_Vegetable

Mister Touch by Malcolm Bosse. It's not talked about very much (and I actually forgot the name not too long ago and had a hell of a time trying to figure of the title) but it's excellent. It's about a group of people in NYC after HIV mutates into an airborne illness. Notably, this was written in 92, way before HIV was treatable, and while AIDS was an epidemic in the gay community. It's definitely not YA or the type of book where everyone survives and it all turns out okay.


bigtiddygothgf7

The Power by Naomi Alderman The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler Future Home of the Living God by Louise Eldrich


rozdino

The Offset by Calder Harris!


[deleted]

[удалено]


goodreads-bot

[**The Wall**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10031.The_Wall) ^(By: Jean-Paul Sartre | 183 pages | Published: 1939 | Popular Shelves: philosophy, fiction, short-stories, classics, french) >'The Wall', the lead story in this collection, introduces three political prisoners on the night prior to their execution. Through the gaze of an impartial doctor--seemingly there for the men's solace--their mental descent is charted in exquisite, often harrowing detail. And as the morning draws inexorably closer, the men cross the psychological wall between life and death, long before the first shot rings out. > >This brilliant snapshot of life in anguish is the perfect introduction to a collection of stories where the neurosis of the modern world is mirrored in the lives of the people that inhabit it. ^(This book has been suggested 1 time) *** ^(20357 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


Feliix42

Maybe {The Wall} by John Lanchester is something for you? Relatively short, but kept me thinking for days after I finished it. Edit: [This](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/45894062-the-wall?from_search=true&from_srp=true&qid=NfCiluwTWR&rank=6) is the book I mean, Goodreads Bot grabbed the wrong one.


goodreads-bot

[**The Wall**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10031.The_Wall) ^(By: Jean-Paul Sartre | 183 pages | Published: 1939 | Popular Shelves: philosophy, fiction, short-stories, classics, french) ^(This book has been suggested 2 times) *** ^(20358 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


TheJazzPear

{Metro 2033}


goodreads-bot

[**Metro 2033 (Metro, #1)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17274667-metro-2033) ^(By: Dmitry Glukhovsky | 458 pages | Published: 2002 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, horror, post-apocalyptic) >The year is 2033. The world has been reduced to rubble. Humanity is nearly extinct. The half-destroyed cities have become uninhabitable through radiation. Beyond their boundaries, they say, lie endless burned-out deserts and the remains of splintered forests. Survivors still remember the past greatness of humankind. But the last remains of civilisation have already become a distant memory, the stuff of myth and legend. > >More than 20 years have passed since the last plane took off from the earth. Rusted railways lead into emptiness. The ether is void and the airwaves echo to a soulless howling where previously the frequencies were full of news from Tokyo, New York, Buenos Aires. Man has handed over stewardship of the earth to new life-forms. Mutated by radiation, they are better adapted to the new world. Man's time is over. > >A few score thousand survivors live on, not knowing whether they are the only ones left on earth. They live in the Moscow Metro - the biggest air-raid shelter ever built. It is humanity's last refuge. Stations have become mini-statelets, their people uniting around ideas, religions, water-filters - or the simple need to repulse an enemy incursion. It is a world without a tomorrow, with no room for dreams, plans, hopes. Feelings have given way to instinct - the most important of which is survival. Survival at any price. VDNKh is the northernmost inhabited station on its line. It was one of the Metro's best stations and still remains secure. But now a new and terrible threat has appeared. > >Artyom, a young man living in VDNKh, is given the task of penetrating to the heart of the Metro, to the legendary Polis, to alert everyone to the awful danger and to get help. He holds the future of his native station in his hands, the whole Metro - and maybe the whole of humanity. ^(This book has been suggested 8 times) *** ^(20360 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


unseenvisitor

The Transall Saga, it's one of my favourite books from my junior high days. Dystopia, space travel-esque. Written by the same guy who wrote Hatchet.


julietwren

The Red Rising series is a little more dark and different imo


SpudDiechmann

{{The 2020 Commission Report on the North Korean Nuclear Attacks Against The United States}} by Dr Jeffrey Lewis.


goodreads-bot

[**The 2020 Commission Report on the North Korean Nuclear Attacks Against the United States: A Speculative Novel**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40206445-the-2020-commission-report-on-the-north-korean-nuclear-attacks-against-t) ^(By: Jeffrey Lewis | ? pages | Published: 2018 | Popular Shelves: fiction, politics, alternate-history, war, owned) >The 2020 Commission Report on the North Korean Nuclear Attacks Against the United States ^(This book has been suggested 1 time) *** ^(20367 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


harsokaveri7872

Broken empire trilogy by Mark Lawrence. Dark and clever. I suggest reading the whole trilogy because the brilliance of the main character starts to really shine in the later books as he grows older.


zeth4

{{Metro 2033 by Dmitri Glukhovsky}}


goodreads-bot

[**Metro 2033 (Metro, #1)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17274667-metro-2033) ^(By: Dmitry Glukhovsky | 458 pages | Published: 2002 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, fiction, horror, post-apocalyptic) >The year is 2033. The world has been reduced to rubble. Humanity is nearly extinct. The half-destroyed cities have become uninhabitable through radiation. Beyond their boundaries, they say, lie endless burned-out deserts and the remains of splintered forests. Survivors still remember the past greatness of humankind. But the last remains of civilisation have already become a distant memory, the stuff of myth and legend. > >More than 20 years have passed since the last plane took off from the earth. Rusted railways lead into emptiness. The ether is void and the airwaves echo to a soulless howling where previously the frequencies were full of news from Tokyo, New York, Buenos Aires. Man has handed over stewardship of the earth to new life-forms. Mutated by radiation, they are better adapted to the new world. Man's time is over. > >A few score thousand survivors live on, not knowing whether they are the only ones left on earth. They live in the Moscow Metro - the biggest air-raid shelter ever built. It is humanity's last refuge. Stations have become mini-statelets, their people uniting around ideas, religions, water-filters - or the simple need to repulse an enemy incursion. It is a world without a tomorrow, with no room for dreams, plans, hopes. Feelings have given way to instinct - the most important of which is survival. Survival at any price. VDNKh is the northernmost inhabited station on its line. It was one of the Metro's best stations and still remains secure. But now a new and terrible threat has appeared. > >Artyom, a young man living in VDNKh, is given the task of penetrating to the heart of the Metro, to the legendary Polis, to alert everyone to the awful danger and to get help. He holds the future of his native station in his hands, the whole Metro - and maybe the whole of humanity. ^(This book has been suggested 9 times) *** ^(20374 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


stratomus

{{The Library at Mount Char}} by Scott Hawkins


goodreads-bot

[**The Library at Mount Char**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26892110-the-library-at-mount-char) ^(By: Scott Hawkins | 390 pages | Published: 2015 | Popular Shelves: fantasy, horror, fiction, science-fiction, sci-fi) >A missing God. >A library with the secrets to the universe. >A woman too busy to notice her heart slipping away. > >Carolyn's not so different from the other people around her. She likes guacamole and cigarettes and steak. She knows how to use a phone. Clothes are a bit tricky, but everyone says nice things about her outfit with the Christmas sweater over the gold bicycle shorts. After all, she was a normal American herself once.   > >That was a long time ago, of course. Before her parents died. Before she and the others were taken in by the man they called Father. In the years since then, Carolyn hasn't had a chance to get out much. Instead, she and her adopted siblings have been raised according to Father's ancient customs. They've studied the books in his Library and learned some of the secrets of his power. And sometimes, they've wondered if their cruel tutor might secretly be God.  Now, Father is missing—perhaps even dead—and the Library that holds his secrets stands unguarded. And with it, control over all of creation. > >As Carolyn gathers the tools she needs for the battle to come, fierce competitors for this prize align against her, all of them with powers that far exceed her own. But Carolyn has accounted for this. And Carolyn has a plan. The only trouble is that in the war to make a new God, she's forgotten to protect the things that make her human. > >Populated by an unforgettable cast of characters and propelled by a plot that will shock you again and again, The Library at Mount Char is at once horrifying and hilarious, mind-blowingly alien and heartbreakingly human, sweepingly visionary and nail-bitingly thrilling—and signals the arrival of a major new voice in fantasy. > >From the Hardcover edition. ^(This book has been suggested 19 times) *** ^(20380 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


IlyenaBena

I haven’t finished it yet, but {{Wool}} seems to be in this vein.


Advo96

The Merchant Princes Alternate reality jumping with basically a mafia clan. It's not super dark though. If you want dark and disturbing ("grimdark") fantasy, try Joe Abercrombie, Best Served Cold. If you want to really tear back the happy veil humans cast over merciless reality, you should read The Selfish Gene. It's a non-fiction book that'll completely disillusion you.


girlnamedtom

{{Parable of the Sower}} by Octavia Butler fits that bill. She has a follow up #2 book as well. I recently read this and interestingly enough, it’s set in the future…2024.


goodreads-bot

[**Parable of the Sower (Earthseed, #1)**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/52397.Parable_of_the_Sower) ^(By: Octavia E. Butler | 345 pages | Published: 1993 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, sci-fi, dystopian, dystopia) >In 2025, with the world descending into madness and anarchy, one woman begins a fateful journey toward a better future. > >Lauren Olamina and her family live in one of the only safe neighborhoods remaining on the outskirts of Los Angeles. Behind the walls of their defended enclave, Lauren’s father, a preacher, and a handful of other citizens try to salvage what remains of a culture that has been destroyed by drugs, disease, war, and chronic water shortages. While her father tries to lead people on the righteous path, Lauren struggles with hyperempathy, a condition that makes her extraordinarily sensitive to the pain of others. > >When fire destroys their compound, Lauren’s family is killed and she is forced out into a world that is fraught with danger. With a handful of other refugees, Lauren must make her way north to safety, along the way conceiving a revolutionary idea that may mean salvation for all mankind. ^(This book has been suggested 24 times) *** ^(20389 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


[deleted]

I want to scream but I have no mouth


Burbujitas-

This may not be as dark as you want but {{The Future of Another Timeline}} is excellent. Also {{Dark Matter}} and {{Recursion}} both still haunt me to this day. But I am kind of a wimp with that stuff.


goodreads-bot

[**The Future of Another Timeline**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43263237-the-future-of-another-timeline) ^(By: Annalee Newitz | 352 pages | Published: 2019 | Popular Shelves: science-fiction, sci-fi, time-travel, fiction, scifi) >From Annalee Newitz, founding editor of io9, comes a story of time travel, murder, and the lengths we'll go to protect the ones we love. > >1992: After a confrontation at a riot grrl concert, seventeen-year-old Beth finds herself in a car with her friend's abusive boyfriend dead in the backseat, agreeing to help her friends hide the body. This murder sets Beth and her friends on a path of escalating violence and vengeance as they realize many other young women in the world need protecting too. > >2022: Determined to use time travel to create a safer future, Tess has dedicated her life to visiting key moments in history and fighting for change. But rewriting the timeline isn’t as simple as editing one person or event. And just when Tess believes she's found a way to make an edit that actually sticks, she encounters a group of dangerous travelers bent on stopping her at any cost. > >Tess and Beth’s lives intertwine as war breaks out across the timeline--a war that threatens to destroy time travel and leave only a small group of elites with the power to shape the past, present, and future. Against the vast and intricate forces of history and humanity, is it possible for a single person’s actions to echo throughout the timeline? ^(This book has been suggested 5 times) [**Dark Matter**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/27833670-dark-matter) ^(By: Blake Crouch, Hilary Clarcq, Andy Weir | 340 pages | Published: 2016 | Popular Shelves: sci-fi, mystery, book-club, audiobook, scifi) >Jason Dessen is walking home through the chilly Chicago streets one night, looking forward to a quiet evening in front of the fireplace with his wife, Daniela, and their son, Charlie—when his reality shatters. > >- - - > >'Are you happy in your life?' > >Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakes to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before the man he's never met smiles down at him and says, 'Welcome back.' > >In this world he's woken up to, Jason's life is not the one he knows. His wife is not his wife. His son was never born. And Jason is not an ordinary college physics professor, but a celebrated genius who has achieved something remarkable. Something impossible. > >Is it this world or the other that's the dream? > >And even if the home he remembers is real, how can Jason possibly make it back to the family he loves? The answers lie in a journey more wondrous and horrifying than anything he could've imagined—one that will force him to confront the darkest parts of himself even as he battles a terrifying, seemingly unbeatable foe. ^(This book has been suggested 28 times) [**Recursion**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42046112-recursion) ^(By: Blake Crouch | 329 pages | Published: 2019 | Popular Shelves: sci-fi, science-fiction, fiction, thriller, time-travel) >Memory makes reality. > >That's what NYC cop Barry Sutton is learning, as he investigates the devastating phenomenon the media has dubbed False Memory Syndrome—a mysterious affliction that drives its victims mad with memories of a life they never lived. > >That's what neuroscientist Helena Smith believes. It's why she's dedicated her life to creating a technology that will let us preserve our most precious memories. If she succeeds, anyone will be able to re-experience a first kiss, the birth of a child, the final moment with a dying parent. > >As Barry searches for the truth, he comes face to face with an opponent more terrifying than any disease—a force that attacks not just our minds, but the very fabric of the past. And as its effects begin to unmake the world as we know it, only he and Helena, working together, will stand a chance at defeating it. > >But how can they make a stand when reality itself is shifting and crumbling all around them? > >At once a relentless pageturner and an intricate science-fiction puzzlebox about time, identity, and memory, Recursion is a thriller as only Blake Crouch could imagine it—and his most ambitious, mind-boggling, irresistible work to date. ^(This book has been suggested 14 times) *** ^(20397 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


New--Tomorrows

{{On The Beach}} really struck with me for it’s ending.


goodreads-bot

[**On the Beach**](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38180.On_the_Beach) ^(By: Nevil Shute | 296 pages | Published: 1957 | Popular Shelves: fiction, science-fiction, post-apocalyptic, classics, sci-fi) >After a nuclear World War III has destroyed most of the globe, the few remaining survivors in southern Australia await the radioactive cloud that is heading their way and bringing certain death to everyone in its path. Among them is an American submarine captain struggling to resist the knowledge that his wife and children in the United States must be dead. Then a faint Morse code signal is picked up, transmitting from somewhere near Seattle, and Captain Towers must lead his submarine crew on a bleak tour of the ruined world in a desperate search for signs of life. On the Beach is a remarkably convincing portrait of how ordinary people might face the most unimaginable nightmare. ^(This book has been suggested 5 times) *** ^(20402 books suggested | )[^(I don't feel so good.. )](https://debugger.medium.com/goodreads-is-retiring-its-current-api-and-book-loving-developers-arent-happy-11ed764dd95)^(| )[^(Source)](https://github.com/rodohanna/reddit-goodreads-bot)


EGOtyst

The road


discodeakie

The Loop trilogy by Ben Oliver is a little bit YAish, but I found the series to be really good


SeaTeawe

I loved The Dead by Charlie Higson, pieces falling into place across books from characters to foreshadowing. It was so delightful to read


RubyHibiscus

The Plot Against America by Philip Roth.


kottabaz

*Amatka* by Karin Tidbeck