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What are the first things to buy for a buyout bag?

What are the first things to buy for a buyout bag?

Raguismybloodtype

First thing to buy is a bag. *Puts shades on*


zoanemesis

I mean obviously lol I plan on buying a rucksack particularly along the lines of what I carried in the army.


QueenOfMetals

Do not buy the bag first. You need to know what you intend to carry to know what size you need. Less is more. You need to know your plans and what obstacles to reaching safety you could run into on the way to your destination. Let me preface this by saying I am a Maxpedition fangirl. I have had their pieces for years. They have been with me for across country travel, hurricanes, and blizzards. I can not say enough goods things about them. I have never been paid a dime to endorse them, I am just a satisfied customer. My pack is a 35L Maxpedition Falcon III. I can add attachment pouches to carry more gear if needs be. Make sure your pack fits well if you have winter layers on. That gets overlooked so much. Assume the conditions you are leaving in are the worst possible. As far as water storage goes, I prefer a 40 oz Kleen Kanteen nested in a GSI cup, swaddled in a Maxpedition water bottle pouch. I keep it as a mini camp kitchen set up. I can have all my fancy utensils, water purification tabs, and pocket stove on the outside pouch. I also shove a Maxpedition can case inside the opening of the lid for my bouillon, and sugar cubes. The Falcon III actually has a pouch for a 3+ liter hydration bladder. The ability to run the hose and bite valve though the pack is nice, but I rarely use it. I use Sea to Summit compression sacks to bundle my clothes. I also have one of their smallest mesh stuff sacks for my hygiene kit. On that note, I highly recommend getting a Scrubba. If you end up stranded somewhere for awhile, and a laundromat is not available, you will be so glad you packed it. Also, pack some vented anti-fog smoke goggles. I see bandanas mentioned on every list, but eye protection always gets overlooked. Pack some pepper spray decon wipes for this same reason. You could be an innocent bystander who gets funneled into the wrong street by law enforcement, and end up pepper sprayed just for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. You will want a good medical kit that is tailored to your needs. Communication system, lighting, gloves, a rain fly, sleep system, passport, essential documents, cash... and so on. My lightweight set up may not be suitable for your needs. My entire pack weighs under 20 lbs. I am looking for ways to make it even lighter, but I will not cut pack weight by cutting bag weight. Ultralight is ideal, but not at the expense of extended hard use. No one knows how long an event could last, or how bad it could get. You need the bag you pick to hold up, so you can not afford to go chintzy here.


Raguismybloodtype

I mean there are some things mil surp that can suffice. I'm more concerned with weight. It does start to lean towards ultralight backpacking which is pricy but being able to move fast is a really really important thing IMO.


bradclarkston

Your really looking for a 30-35L bag maybe as high as a 45L assault bag but that's really pushing what you need and what you think you need. A 60L ruck is going to be damn heavy as you get older and stick out like a sore thumb in a city it's going to scream "prepper with good sh!t" to everyone. Look at Roaring Fire's bags for good & cheap the wife and kid rocks there 30L packs in the car trunk. I like the L.L. Bean Continental Rucksack at 33L with side pockets.


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Raguismybloodtype

No. Realistic bag size forces informed decisions. Otherwise everyone's running around with 80L bags. Correction everyone has 80L bags that sit there looking good doing nothing because they weigh 60+lbs


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bellj1210

I am not a fan of having honey holes or whatever people call leaving supplies along their expected route. You are right, your bag all depends on you. Personally, i do not wear socks on a daily basis (not wearing them now in my docksiders), so dry socks are in every one of my bags, normally 2 good pairs so if i have to go a few days, i can rotate them.


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bellj1210

I love the idea of metal detecting where you think they will store stuff. That is brilliant. I get your point; but i think the reality is that most preppers do not plan on going to a secondary location. Where they live now is their destination.


Holiday-Fly-6319

Always pack a towel.


bellj1210

you always have to know where your towel is


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noone512

This. Where are you bugging out To and what would it take to get there? A get home bag is likely much more practical but not nearly as tactical and sexy


bellj1210

yep, i barely have a bug out option (have a bag for it, but not the best gear in there). The get home options are where i have put most of my eggs. My house is where i want to be, and i splurged for the get home bag and some home preps. If i have to leave that site, i already know i am in trouble.


FtRepose

Yep. What is your realistic plan and potential needs? Building a bag full of stealthy bushcraft gear doesn’t help if your most likely bugout is driving across the state to ride out a storm with the in-laws. It doesn’t hurt to build a bag you’re not likely to use but it hurts to not address your much more likely threat events.


staydeadpoliticians

the 5 c’s of survival by dave canterbury the addition 5 c’s after that by bear independent


Educational_Seesaw95

If it’s urban: flash light, dry food, water, umbrella, large sun hat and a blanket works wonders.


bellj1210

rain gear over umbrella. Umbrellas have options for shade, but are terrible for keeping you dry.


Educational_Seesaw95

Understandable but you most likely won’t be standing out in the plains like you would in the trail. Smart person would just head under a building or bus stop. I’m not arguing how protective it is against the rain either just the practical uses.


bradclarkston

1.) Headlamp and Flashlight. 2.) Metal water/cook container + fire kit. 3.) Cover/warmth - tarp/bivy/poncho liner/shemagh.


coyote_of_the_month

I put mine together after an apartment fire left my girlfriend and me standing on the curb with a bunch of other poor bastards just watching the flames. This is probably a more likely scenario than SHTF. What I wished I had then, standing on the sidewalk: - Toothbrush - Toothpaste - Water What I may have needed if we hadn't been able to get her car out: - Cash - Spare credit card - Identification What I may have needed if we hadn't just been able to go to my place (we didn't live together at the time): - Seasonally appropriate clothes - Deodorant - Shoes - Sunglasses - Phone charger Judgement call (maybe better off in a safe; I don't have them in my BOB): - Passport - Birth certificate - Vehicle and property titles If you're expecting SHTF, whether realistically or not, you could add weapons and food. But I think a more realistic need for a BOB is going to be a localized emergency, where you can fix your problems with a credit card in the morning and just need to stay comfortable through a stressful night.


zoanemesis

Yea you make a good point, I think I'm gunna pack a BOB/car bag for realistic emergencies, like getting stuck on the side of the road in a snowstorm. I'm gunna try to have it set up to last me 3 days. I think that's a realistic goal.


PSketty

A sound plan which answers your contextual information; from/to where, by what means, why, when, with whom, and for how long?


followupquestion

Go read on r/Ultralight so you can get a taste for packing light and moving quickly. Water is really heavy, and in my area of California, water is absolutely going to be the hardest thing to acquire in a grid down situation. Plan to cycle water in your trunk fairly often if it’s in the heat, then go with either a bladder and tube or a water bottle depending on your preference. Either way, get really comfortable with being slightly less than comfortable and cut weight from your bag ruthlessly. It’s a BOB, not an RV, so pack accordingly.


Senor_Martillo

You need a high cyclic machine gun with a minimum of 14000 rounds of ammo, a bunch of pouches with Velcro and stuff (so you can practice going on FullTacticalAlert^tm, ) a KBar knife with bayonet mounting rings so you can stab zombies when your ammo runs out, a can of bear mace, a case of fragmenting hand Grenades, and a life straw.


luna1693

You forgot the Snickers bars


Halo22B

Dude he's asking about long term water...should we let him in on the super secret freeze dried water all us real preppers carry?


itsadiseaster

Came to say just that and nothing more. Good equipment that will guarantee 100% survival.