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Primary chords of Neapolitan minor?

Primary chords of Neapolitan minor?

ContributionNo7142

Chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry.


Livid-Process-8873

Lmaooo


65TwinReverbRI

The ones you use as primary chords. Because the chords we call primary chords in Major or Minor are not primary by virtue of some intrinsic quality of the chord, but because they were used that way in music. I'd also point out that actually the "primary" chords are usually wrong: People use I, IV, and V but in Common Practice Period Music (where the Key and Tonal system evolved and where such chords took on primary roles) it's actually ii that's a more important chord than IV (IV might be considered a more important key area though). And really, I and V represent a basic concept: Home, and Away. So any non-Key or non-Tonal system can do the same if you like - simply have a Home chord and an Away chord - two of your choosing. Neapolitan minor has not been used in any "common practice" so there is no established norm to say I and V for example. However, you could follow the idea in that the roots of the two chords are fairly distant, and that the note content is largely different (especially if you consider V7) in a standard Key and apply the same principle. Obviously if you want a parallel, on C, Cm could be your primary chord of course - C-Eb-G - traditional tonic. Then all you need is "not tonic" notes but a shared G to have it "behave similarly" to I and V in Key-based music. G - B - Db. Done. Or G-B-Db-F - V7b5 and I If you want a "II" chord of sorts if you need a 3rd primary chord, well Db-F-Ab is right there. In fact, it's why it's called "Neapolitan" - bII chord. But there's no reason you have to use a I and V analog. If you piece has a Home and Away chord of I and bII, then those become your "Primary" chords. Primary is not set in stone - it's based on what was done in music. And since Neapolitan minor doesn't have the huge repository of works that Major and Minor do, you have more leeway in coming up with your own thing. There is of course a plain minor iv there too. But IMHO the whole point of not using major or minor to begin with is not only to get a new and different set of notes, but also to get a new and different way of working with chords - you don't have to do what other music did before in terms of "primary" (or worse, functional harmony). But you can use a broader concept like home and away if you feel the need to have at least something like that. Hope that helps.


Livid-Process-8873

This actually helps so much! Thanks!


HexspaReloaded

Well, I started looking into this and halfway through I realized it’s a chromatic scale. I don’t think most people use them as parent scales but here’s my piss take on N.mi and its modes. There’s also a N.ma with a M6 instead of a m6 but I’ll let you figure that one out. Here’s the wiki https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neapolitan_scale Like I said, these are practically non-standard so my nomenclature may fit you or it might not. Two scales (both minor) Neapolitan minor Neapolitan major N.mi (harmonic minor b2) 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 7 C Db Eb F G Ab B N.ma (melodic minor b2) 1 b2 b3 4 5 6 7 N.mi modes: Neapolitan Minor (harm mi b2) 1 m2 m3 4 5 m6 7 [1 b9 b3 11 5 b13 7] Cmi(ma7)(b9, b13) Lydian #6 1 2 3 A4 5 A6 7 [1 9 3 #11 5 b7 7] Cma9(#11, add b7) Mixo Augmented 1 2 3 4 A5 6 m7 [1 9 3 11 #5 13 b7] C+13 Romani Minor (aeolian #4) 1 2 m3 A4 5 m6 m7 [1 9 b3 #11 5 b13 b7] Cmi9(#11, b13) Locrian Dominant 1 m2 3 4 D5 m6 m7 [1 b9 3 11 b5 b13 b7] C7(b5, b9, b13) Ionian #2 1 A2 3 4 5 6 7 [1 #9 3 11 5 13 7] Cma7(#9) Ultralocrian bb3 1 m2 D3 D4 D5 m6 D7 [1 b9 2 3 #11 #5 13] C+6(b9, #11)


Livid-Process-8873

Thank you so much!!!


KingAdamXVII

i, bII, iv, V, and bVI.


Livid-Process-8873

How did you come to this conclusion though?


KingAdamXVII

They are the only minor or major diatonic chords.


Livid-Process-8873

Oh okay thank you!


xiipaoc

Looks like Neapolitan minor is phrygian on the bottom and harmonic minor on top, so 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 7. Your main dominant equivalent will probably be bII, probably with an augmented 6th too, what might otherwise be misspelled as bIIdom7. An equivalent chord, almost, is V7b5. You'll probably be shuttling back and forth from i to iv as well. If we look at the other chords, you have bIII#5, which is awkward to use and is probably more of a suspension of a V7b5 chord, bVI, which is fine but not exactly primary usually, and viiobb3, which is really just the bII#6 chord without a fifth, so that one doesn't count.


Livid-Process-8873

How do you find the dominant equivalent?


xiipaoc

In phrygian dominant, bII - I is a very common cadential progression, so I see no reason why you wouldn't use bII similarly in Neapolitan minor. It leads to the tonic very well.


Livid-Process-8873

Oh okay so to find the dominant equivalent, you just take a primary chord that would make sense as a dominant?


Livid-Process-8873

Also sorry lol what makes the iv a primary chord since it doesn’t contain a defining tone? Or is the b6 a defining tone?