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[deleted]

One of the ways of saying “having sex” in Irish is ag bualadh craiceann”. It literally means “whackin’ skins”


Tuitttu

In Finnish we have "läpsytellä pissavehkeitä" which means "slapping of the peeing gadgets"


Pingouin-Pingouin

In French we have "faire zizi-panpan" which means "to do peepee-bangbang". There is also "faire crac-crac-boum-boum" which I believe is pretty self-explainatory.


[deleted]

> to do peepee-bangbang Please tell me this is how French middle schoolers talk about it and not a serious term 😂


Pingouin-Pingouin

I'd say it's even a primary schoolers expression XDD I for myself still uses it (am 22) because I find it very funny XD


Reapr

This is cool, in my language (Afrikaans) we had crude slang for sex when I was growing up and 'velle klap' was one of them - translates to slapping skins.


hardy_and_free

I'm a fan of "scaoil amach an bobailín" for let's party.


[deleted]

In spanish, when someone is being very honest, we can say "Sin pelos en la lengua" and the literal translation in english would be "Without hairs in the tongue".


crivemi

Same in Italian!


[deleted]

Oh really? How do you write it in italian, i'm curious.


crivemi

Senza peli sulla lingua ;)


[deleted]

Thanks, our languages look so similar.


[deleted]

"Brez dlake na jeziku" in Slovenian :)


EdTheOtherNerd

In French, you shouldn't "vendre la peau de l'ours avant de l'avoir tué", which I believe makes a more compelling advice than warning against counting chickens before they hatch, because it means that you shouldn't sell the bear skin before killing the bear.


viktorbir

Ain't it quite international? We have it in Catalan and I think I've read it some other languages.


hajsenberg

We have a similar saying in Polish: "Nie dziel skóry na niedźwiedziu", which literally means "Don't split the skin on the bear"


Emilavarazslo

In Hungary, it's "don't drink on the bear's skin in advance".


joannabannana

In Romanian if somebody is wasting his time then he’s rubbing the mint (freacă menta); if he gets angry then his mustard jumps (ii sare muștarul); if somebody is really surprised then his face has fallen off (ii pică fața) aaand the best for last: If somebody accomplishes a lot with very little, he’s made a whip out of shit (face din rahat bici)


allie-the-cat

« Être le boss de bécosse » is to be someone who bosses others around with little actual authority. Translated literally to « to be the boss of the outhouses »


brocoli_funky

C'est du Québécois? J'ai jamais entendu cette expression et je ne sais pas ce que *bécosse* veut dire…


allie-the-cat

Oui, ça vient du Québec! Bécosse c’est une déformation du mot anglais “backhouse”.


MiraHel

When you want to tell someone to mind their own business, you tell them something that literally translates to:"Who asked you about your shoe size" Edit: I am Tunisian


spectator_nouus

In [Corsican](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBVg3S1xywo&feature=youtu.be&t=76), when someone gives his opinion without anyone asked him we say : *Risponde Pilatu senza esse chjamatu.* It literally means : Pilate answers without being called. I don't the story of that idiom and why Pontius Pilate is involved!


viktorbir

Do you have a saying about going from Herodes to Pilate? In Catalan it means go round and round and getting no result, like trying to deal with civil servants.


spectator_nouus

No, we have many idioms meaning "go round and round and getting no result" but any with Pilate and Herodes :)


Radiant_Raspberry

There are just too many. (German) For example: „The dog is going crazy in the frying pan“ which means something like „Wow thats crazy“ or „Snow from yesterday“ and „Sponge over it“ to say „Dont worry about it, its okay“ There are a lot more good ones, but i cant think of any more off the top of my head right now. (off the top of my head by the way is a weird english one...) My favourite probably is „jemandem auf den Keks gehen“ for „to annoy somebody“. Literally it translates to „to go somebody on the cookie/to go on somebodies cookie“ There are a lot of ways to express annoying, like „to go on the cookie“, „to go on the ghost“, „to go on somebodys nerves“, „to fall on someones nerves“


amazingfloof

"Du gehst mir auf den Sack" (literally "you are walking on my bag" is another way to say "you annoy me" in German. The word "Sack" is also a synonym for balls/nuts, so walking on them sounds... painfully annoying?


LokianEule

I only understand train station.


Onionbar

畫蛇添足 Literally to draw snake with feet Meaning improving thing unnecessarily, or to overdo something


LokianEule

Hahaha I forgot about this one. So funny


[deleted]

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amazingfloof

In Germany there is something similar, "die Kuh muss vom Eis", meaning "the cow has to get off the ice" or "we have to get the cow off the ice". It means, that there is a problem to be solved to avoid serious trouble. Actually, it seems like the opposite... Do you have the same one as well in Swedish?


[deleted]

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amazingfloof

thank you for looking that up (: I think it's fascinating to see such relations between different languages (related or not).


Linguistin229

In French it’s tuna I think, like faire du thon = make some dough. Sad it’s not also a fish for us in English!


dorodaraja

They say squid in cockney 🙂


palmtree42069

In Switzerland, if you want to tell someone that his actions will have consequences (aka you will "provide" the consequences), you can say "I will show you where the bearded man goes to get his apple juice" "I just don't like this person because we don't agree on anything and it just doesn't work between us" can be said as "we don't have our hay in the same barn"


Radiant_Raspberry

Could you tell me the original idioms? Now im interested.


palmtree42069

The first one is "Ich zaag/zeig dir, wo de Bartli de Moscht holt", the second one is "Mir hend s Heu nid uf gliicher Bühni" (there is no standardized spelling for Swiss German, it will probably differ a lot from region to region)


doombom

What is Moscht? Just a Swiss word for Apfelsaft or is it a similar but not quite the same drink?


palmtree42069

It can be used as a word for normal apple juice, but also for fermented apple or grape juice (the one that you leave for a few days until it has some bubbles and a little bit of alcohol if that makes sense). Usually, you use "Moscht" for apple juice (fermented or not) and "Truubemoscht" for grape juice. Also, "Moscht" is always without any added water. Sometimes, you can buy apple juice mixed with sparkling water, but this is not the "real" one.


kilttikoira

I think the English word would be “cider”? Can either be fermented or not...


palmtree42069

Oh yes, that's true! I completely forgot about this word...


[deleted]

One Turkish idiom goes like “Allah’ın sopası yok”, which translates as “God doesn’t have a beating stick”. It’s basically the Turkish equivalent of “play stupid games, win stupid prizes”, with the logic that since God doesn’t directly punish people, God resorts to indirect methods of punishment.


Amazonovic

Turkish has some of the BEST sayings. I got “azimli siçan duvari deler “ (with ambition you can shit through a wall) for my license plate holder as I find it to be so motivational!


amazingfloof

I feel like Germans really like to complain about stuff, because saying "Da kann man nicht meckern." (there is nothing to complain about) is considered a genuine gesture of approval.


[deleted]

'دمك ثقيل' Damak Thqeel This literally translates to 'your blood is heavy', and is used for somebody who isn't funny. It shouldn't come as a surprise if they usually think they are.


Sophiadaputa

In the south of brazil, when its too cold we say that’s a “frio de renguiar cusco” that means “its a cold to make dogs walk in that particular way that people who have a injury in one of their legs do”. We actually have a page on instagram that publish the translations of brazilian idioms and its very accurate. The name is greengodictionary


Sophiadaputa

We also say “é de fuder o cu do palhaço” that means “is to fuck the clown’s asshole” when something is really bad or you are fucked.


cardosocor

É de cair o cu da bunda when something is surprising in a negative way


Sophiadaputa

“It’s to fall the asshole from the butt”


annstenblack

In Russian, "водить за нос" (to trick someone, to fail to fulfil a promise) literally translates as "to lead/pull someone by their nose"; "довести до белого каления" means to anger someone, to drive someone crazy, and it has to do with blacksmithing when a metal is so hot it turns white.


ArcyCiern

Polish: Nie mój cyrk, nie moje małpy. Not my circus, not my monkeys. Means: that's not my problem.


Shevyshev

This expression exists in English too - just like that - not my circus, not my monkeys. Edit: When I search for this is it described as being of Polish origin. And yet, my wife says this all of the time and has no Polish ancestry, so I guess it is in general circulation.


Absolute-Hate

In Argentina we say: *"A caballo regalado no se le miran los dientes"* which means "do not look the teeth of a gifted horse". Don't be picky with things given freely.


hardy_and_free

We have the same phrase in English. Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.


spectator_nouus

Amazing, we have the same in [Corsican](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBVg3S1xywo&feature=youtu.be&t=76) ! *À cavallu datu, ùn si feghja i denti* We have also the variant : *À cavallu datu ùn li guardà palataghja. "palataghja"* meaning a disease, especially of horses, mules and donkeys due to swelling or inflammation of the palate.


[deleted]

In Swedish there is one which I find very cute. It’s used when there is a lack of space, let’s say around a dinner table, and one doesn’t know if everyone will fit. There is always space for those who also have a place in your heart. ‘Finns det hjärterum, finns det stjärterum’, which means that if there is room in the heart, there is room for the bum.


tejesen

My favourite response to how are you is like "a mosott szar". Like washed / wet shit basically. Quite descriptive. There's actually a cool Instagram page (inhungarywesay) where they post sayings like this with the literal translation. My all time favourite is "nem szarral gurigazik". Its literally like he's not rolling with shit, but it means he's not messing around, he's working with something important etc


viktorbir

*«Ser cul i merda»*, to be arse and shit, means to be always together, as in two people (you dislike) that are always around together (not in a romantic way)


Sego1211

French has so many phrases that usually involve food. My favourite is "la moutarde me monte au nez" (mustard is running up my nose), which means that you're getting angry. "Être une bonne poire" (to be a good pear) is something you say of someone who is serviceable but gullible. It's similar to "être un pigeon" (to be a pigeon), which has stronger negative connotations and is used to mean a person that has been swindled or, in the common phrase "Je suis pas un pigeon" (I'm not a pigeon), used to say that you know something is a con.


[deleted]

In French we have "ne pas y aller avec le dos de la cuillère", which literally translates to "to not go at it with the back of the spoon". The sense is to do something 100%, to not do half-measures, to not compromise, or to go at it enthusiastically. I still find the implied inverse image funny, i.e. someone trying to eat with his spoon the wrong way around.


viktorbir

Two Catalan ones and a Swahili one: * *De mica en mica s'omple la pica*. Little by little the sink gets filled. * *De gota en gota s'omple la bóta*. Drop by drop the barrel gets filled. * *Haba na haba hujaza kibaba*. Few and few fills the pint.¹ ¹ Not a drinking pint, but the measuring unit, or a similar one called *kibaba*.


Amazonovic

Bosnian has “Jebejim ti sunse zjarko” (let me know if spelled wrong) which is a great threat to start a fight, “I will fuck your scorching hot sun”.


Pullaharakka

There are so many good ones in Finnish. ”hukkua kuin pieru Saharaan” means literally ’to disappear like a fart in Sahara desert’ ”juosta pää kolmantena jalkana” which literally means ’to run with a head as a third leg’, in other words ’to run really fast’


[deleted]

苍蝇也是肉 - lit. "flies are also meat", it means every little bit counts


supersonac7

There are some funny ones in Hindi: आ बैल मुझे मार (Aa bail mujhe maar) - Translates to "Come, O Bull! And hit me." It's a little dramatic haha, and means inviting a problem. There's also: नाच न जाने आंगन टेढ़ा (Naach na jaane, aangan tedha), this translates to - One who doesn't know how to dance says that the stage is broken. And, भैंस के आगे बीन बजाना (Bhains ke aagey been bajaana) - Which translates to - Playing the trumpet in front of a Buffalo. There's an English equivalent for this one, "To cast your pearls before a swine". And: थाली का बैंगन (Thaali ka baigan) - The literal translation is "Be a brinjal on a plate" - this is used for people who quickly change sides, much like a brinjal would roll around on a plate. And the last one: बंदर क्या जाने अदरक का स्वाद (Bandar kya jaane adrak ka swaad) - Translates as " Don't expect a monkey to know how ginger tastes " - probably means how an ignorant person shouldn't be expected to appreciate/ have taste for classy things! There are so many others that I'll put here if I remember.


Linguistin229

That's interesting, the one about dancing and the broken stage reminds me of the English "A bad workman always blames his tools".


supersonac7

Yes, it's implying the same idea!


LordAppletree

Spanish: entre el dicho y el hecho hay mucho trecho. Between what is said and done, there’s a lot of distance. Polish: nie diel się skórę na niedźwiedziu. Don’t divide up the the pelt [while it’s still] on the bear


letmesleep01

Dutch has a few fun ones: Now my wooden shoe breaks (nu breekt mijn klomp); basically you're just very surprised about something It is dickblack (het is pikzwart); it is very dark Were you born in church?! (Ben je in de kerk geboren?!); you say this to someone when they don't close the door behind them To dick from your neck (uit je nek lullen); to talk bullshit To old whore (ouwehoeren); talking about nothing in particular, just talking to make conversation Unfortunately, peanutbutter (helaas pindakaas); too bad (it rhymes in Dutch) There are more, but these are the ones I can think of of the top of my head


IsurusOxyrinchus354

Back when I tried my hand at Slovenian, I learned that the expression used for stating that one is hungover is (transliterated) 'matchka imam' which is something along the lines of 'I have a cat'. Im sure someone more familiar can elaborate, but if you've ever been clawed by a cat, it seems pretty clearcut to me XD


[deleted]

Interesting, German is the same "einen Kater haben"


gwaydms

Katzenjammer (German, yowling of cats) means a bad hangover. It was borrowed into English from the many German immigrants in the 19th century, but is considered sort of old-fashioned now.


IsurusOxyrinchus354

Fascinating, the only things I know in German, other than some basic greetings is, 'lerne leiden ohne zu klagen' and that 'Stubentiger' means, essentially, 'Living-room Tiger' referring to a housecat XD.


Reapr

My favourite in Afrikaans is "Nie eers 'n donkie stamp sy kop twee keer teen dieselfde klip nie" Translation: Not even a donkey bumps his head twice against the same rock Meaning: Similar to fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice shame on me. Or just, learn from your mistakes, don't do the same stupid thing twice expecting different results.


salamitaktik

I've got some German idioms for you. *To know where the frog's got its curls* >Knowing an unwritten set of social rules, being not gullible *How would it bother the proud oak if the sow rubs itself against it?" >Staying cool despite backlash or being stubborn and resistant to critisism *Fry me a stork!* >Utterance of disbelief *You won't get the door shut!* >Mildly ironic utterance of disbelief, especially if a situation so intense or >absurd that you wouldn't be able to stop it. *What the peasant doesn't know, he won't eat* >Mocking a person's inability or unwillingness to accept change or new stuff *To walk oneself a wolf* >Walking for so long that your thighs get sore *To talk around the hot porridge* >Not getting to the point *To walk around the pudding* >Taking a detour *That wouldn't lure out any dog from behind the oven* >Something's so boring that nobody could be interested for it


MelayuIslam20

This is the Malay idiom(peribahasa) that i think is the best becauswe this idiom has a very deep meaning. The idiom is"hanya jauhari mengenal manikam".Its English equivalent is "only the knowledgeable one truly knows".If it is literally translate,the translation is "like a jewel knowing a bead"[1].If you want to know the Malay language better,I advised you to learn the Jawi writing system because Jawi has a very essential role in the Malay language.It is because according to history,Jawi has been used almost 1 thousand years in Nusantara (Malay Archipelago) while the Latin writing system only been used since 50 years back in Nusantara. That's all from me.Goodbye. From, u/MelayuIslam20 Source: [1]mymemory.translated.net


masowipigawets

Det finnes ikke dårlig vær, båre dårlige klær literally translated to "There's no such thing as bad weather, only bad kleather"


[deleted]

Same in Swedish! ‘Det finns inget dåligt väder, bara dåliga kläder.’


Belluuo

"Muita mão" translates to "much hand", but it actually is saying for when something is too tiring to do. "De cair os butia do bolso" translates to "it's to fall the butia from the pocket" (butia is a tiny fruit) and you say it when something is shocking or unexpexted. The expression "que barbaridade" also can be used and it means "such barbaric" And my favorite, the "bah" which is something you can use to express ANY emotion. Depends on your tone. These translations of mine are a bit iffy, but it's difficult to translate the expressions.


Nicofatpad

In the Filipino language, tagalog, the phrase “makapal ang mukha” translates to “thick-faced” And I honestly know how it corresponds but it means someone who is shameless/rude/obnoxious/insensitive. Usually its all 4 in one, which is pretty common apparently. But I also don’t really understand how this saying came to be, I’m not quite understanding the correlation between having a thick face and being shameless.


semasiograft

I'm guessing it's the opposite of balat-sibuyas, or "thin skinned" and sensitive. Another tagalog expression regarding faces, "mukhang may apat na kanto" or a face with 4 corners, which means ugly. This gets me every time.


Nicofatpad

LMAO the filipino way of saying you look like steve


crivemi

Italian: “ti stai arrampicando sugli specchi” it translate literally as “you’re climbing mirrors”. Used when the person in question knows that he’s making excuses, and yet refuses to admit it and constitutes to build on top of them, making it clearer and clearer he doesn’t have evidence to support his arguments.


Kauramthym

In French we have a few ones that I find very funny, for example : " Y a pas à tortiller du cul pour chier droit" which means that there's no need to overcomplicate things when the solution is clear and simple. And the literal translation is : " no need to twist your ass around to shit straight" We also have "pédé comme un phoque" which means someone is very stereotypically gay, it used to be used by homophobes but now it's just an out-dated saying so it's used as a joke to make fun of homophobes or to imitate them when a friend does something effeminate. Literally means "as much of a fag as seals (the sea animal)" We have "pisser dans un violon" : doing something useless, ineffective. Literally means to pee in a violon. Another one because I'm feeling generous "avoir le cul bordé de nouilles" means to be very lucky, however its literal translation is "to have the ass bordered with noodles". Language of love they say


Kauramthym

French equivalent to haters gonna hate would probably be "la bave du crapaud n'atteint pas la blanche colombe" which means "The toad's drool doesn't reach the white dove"


LokianEule

自相矛盾 zi4xiang1mao2dun4 Literally: self - mutual - spear - shield = to contradict onself The story behind it (yes, there's a whole story lol): "On a beautiful summer afternoon during the [戰國時代 Warring States period](https://ancientchengyu.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Warring-States-Period.jpg), a man from the State of 楚 (Chǔ) walked to the market to sell his spear and shield.  This may be his lucky day since the market was bustling with people.  With enthusiasm he shouted, “Look!  This spear is the sharpest on Earth!  It is sharper than the Sword of Goujian and can pierce through anything!” A crowd gathered around the man upon hearing his words.  The man grew more excited and boasted, “My shield here is extremely strong!  No spear or arrow can pierce through it!”  More people gathered around him as he held up his spear and shield.  Pointing at the shield, one boy stepped out from the crowd and asked, “If you try to pierce your shield with your spear, what will happen?”  After a brief pause, the man lowered his head in embarrassment and fled.  A few laughs later, the crowd disbursed and continued on their business. " I guess it's like if we all knew this story in English and we called it "spear-shielding yourself".


KlausTeachermann

"Go n-éirí an t-ádh leat" in Gaeilge/Irish means "good luck", but translates directly as "may success rise to you...


Mythical_Atlacatl

Not here to f\*\*\* spiders ​ Try to guess what it means :D and country of origin


[deleted]

[https://blog.learnslovenianonline.com/2014/04/slovenian-idioms/](https://blog.learnslovenianonline.com/2014/04/slovenian-idioms/) ​ Wow, I have never realized how funny and ridiculous some of these are...