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Dina Sanichar, the feral boy found after being raised by wolves and was the inspiration for The Jungle Book's character of Mowgli

Dina Sanichar, the feral boy found after being raised by wolves and was the inspiration for The Jungle Book's character of Mowgli

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Yellow__Sn0w

Dude's eyes look like he has been stuck in fight or flight mode every second of his whole life.


AStreamOfCream

Sure do. Very intense.


ESSDBee

He’s seen some shit. Has the “It’s like a jungle sometimes it makes me wonder how I keep from going under!” look.


Yellow__Sn0w

Reminds me of old war photos of people with shell shock.


manofsands

He seemed much more happy in the movie


munk_e_man

They should've made the remake have a super realistic mowgli.


greatunknownpub

They did, it was called Lord of the Rings.


Still_counts_as_one

“You have no friends, No one likes you”


Compliant_Automaton

Yeah, but this picture has cropped out the most relevant part of the image. In the original, there's a wolf nearby, shrugging, with a "hey, we did our best" expression. Viewed in context, all I can think is 'you sure did, buddy. You sure did.'


Rude-Conversation578

they did a phenomenal job honestly in the fact that he lived to adulthood. how incredible


Shredding_Airguitar

Wild how those first 7 years made such an impact that after being with humans for his remaining 28 years he still never learned to talk or anything


gpyrgpyra

You should read about Genie. All linguistics students learn about her. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genie_(feral_child) She was kept in isolation by abusive parents and never learned to speak If you don't learn language early enough, you will never be able to


kranker

> Authorities then moved her into the first of what would become a series of institutions for disabled adults, and the people running it cut her off from almost everyone she knew and subjected her to extreme physical and emotional abuse What the fuck


Muscar

Welcome to reality, this was far from uncommon and happens to this day in many parts of the world. People that have mental illness of any kind get abused to disgusting levels. It's generally a lot better today, of course, but not as good as it should be.


anisegarden

And yet their abusers are out in the world being considered normal/sane


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FabiusPetronius

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is a massive fraud.


Ronachickamonga

God humans are so sick sometimes. Any intro to psychology class introduces you to a bunch of sick torturous academics. It’s really weird.


OohYeahOrADragon

Many professions have either dark beginnings and are doing better presently....or have good beginnings and doing worse presently.


VetusVesperlilio

When my dad came home after WW2, he could *not* stay indoors during thunderstorms. He had to be outside, no matter how hard the rain. I can remember as a kid waking up in the middle of the night and seeing him standing out in the middle of our dinky gravel road, looking up into the sky. Eventually it got a little better, but even at 94 when it rained he needed to be by a window looking out.


MTGO_Duderino

Ok, i stopped telling people about how i act like this because no one seemed to get it. One summer during a training course in the army it rained almost nonstop for two straight months. Heavy rain, too. I've never experienced such persistent precipitation in the rest of my life all over the US. The training was almost entirely outdoors, although our barracks and other buildings were not major structures, so even inside we felt like we were in the rain sometimes. It didnt take long for most of us to simply get used to it. We stopped putting on our wet weather gear. Stopped trying to put up proper shelter for sleeping under. We just wrapped up in a poncho and held on for the few hours of sleep we could get. Sometimes the rain was cold enough at night that we would even spoon together in a large huddle to sleep. Being in the army after that i guess i didnt really notice I acted like this since we still did stuff outside during the rain, but i started to notice it when i was home on leave. When it rained I couldnt sleep. I would get very anxious and take a mental inventory of all my belongings and the people around me. So I would step outside and just be in the rain for a moment and that would settle my nerves. I still do some of this 15 years later. I have to at least get up and check on it through the window just like you described your dad doing. I imagine that it maybe wasnt any worse than a typical monsoon season for some parts of the world, but combined with stress and additional hardship of dealing with it during a long training course it had a lasting impact on me. It feels weird calling it trauma, but i suppose that's what it might be classified as.


VetusVesperlilio

That’s very like my dad’s experience. I hope you have better sleeping conditions now!


eddie1975

As a Boy Scout I’ve camped in the snow with bottomless tents but the coldest I’ve ever slept was in the military in Brazil sleeping on the wet grass with just a wet blanket on some mountains. Your metabolism is running so high to keep you warm that you wake up every two minutes (it felt like) and you’d be completely awake and alert then sleep for another two minutes (it felt like) and wake up again completely alert. On another occasion they came in to our sleeping area on the base with machine guns going off (blanks, of course) and woke everybody up screaming and hollering to get geared up and ready as fast as possible and then we got lined up in formation and went through inspection. On another trip in the woods we slept at 4 AM everyday and got up at 5 AM. We did this for a week. We also would get 15 minutes of sleep after lunch which felt like 2 hours it was so deep. After a few a days a lot of people, myself included, started hallucinating. I never had to go to war and never had to fear for my life or shoot anyone or get shot at but I dreamt of being in those artificially created high intensity stressful environments for many nights for at least a decade after finishing my military service and then it became less frequent. It’s easy for me to see how PTSD can set in and can stay with people for life.


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Noble9360

As someone who has such proclivity. Mortars.


LoftyPurple

The sad reality is that if you WANT to abuse people, you seek out jobs like this so you CAN abuse people. Sure, they're probably a small minority but they give everyone a bad name. Teachers and school staff have the same issue with sexual abuse. Again, it's a tiny portion, but if you want to abuse kids, you will go to where the kids are. This is why so many people have an issue with male workers working with kids. They immediately think of all of the cases of sexual abuse and go on the defensive.


Paula92

My small private school had 2 sex offenders arrested in the space of 10 years. You’re not wrong. Even better if you have the charisma to make everyone who works with you think you’re the best. After the latter was arrested, a lot of us alumni had “wow in hindsight how did we not see these red flags”?


Purple_Chipmunk_

What were the red flags?


Remarkable-Ocelot-51

And they’re paid for all of it


nastyn8k

Oh my god... This just unlocked a memory in me. My friend in high school told me they opened the door to an attic and the person's house they were at had a "retarded kid" locked up in their attic (his words). They got scared and ran out of the house and never went back. I wish I could help, but this shit was years ago and the event was already years prior when I heard about it. Edit: The memory kept flowing with (hopefully) good result. I remember now they told the police or someone, but he doesn't know what happened. I'm gonna message him and see. Edit 2: OKAY... the conclusion. This happened in Hustisford, WI. A tiny shithole of a town. That's where a lot of the junkies and drunks live in that area. Anyways... He says something must have happened after they told someone because he started seeing him take the short bus to school shortly after that happened. The child wasn't taken away, but the parents were likely forced to take care of him instead of neglecting him. He wasn't abused like Genie was, but he certainly was being neglected and the parent's must have been watched by child services after that. I want to say I'm surprised they let the parent's keep the child, but after hearing stories about how many chances CPA gives people, I'm actually not surprised. At least it seems like they started treating the kid better.


somchai35

The kids name was Hugo and they fed him on buckets of fish heads.


tildraev

I reread this 3 times in the wiki thinking I misunderstood. People really just suck. This poor girl. My heart ached even more after reading the abuse never stopped.


-azuma-

Jesus Fuck. This kid never even had a chance. Ever. Absolutely gut-wrenching.


ThorDansLaCroix

People trying to "fix" abused people can be just as abusing. Because we have this idea that there is a "correct" way of being to become utilitarian for society, instead of just accept people and their limitations.


riskbreaker23

In the case of Genie I believe they initially had her best interests in mind. For one thing, all their tests showed that Genie was mentally a relatively normal human being. If it had not been for her abuse, she could have learned social and linguistic skills normally. Since she was clearly capable of it, she could be taught these skills and at least have a better quality of life, even if she wasn't ever fully going to learn. Unfortunately a lot of fuckery happened and that isn't what happened to genie. She became the victim of more abuse as time went on. You'd think she had suffered enough. But you're right. Our crime of thinking we can fix a person has lead to a lot of abuse. The deaf community has a big history on this as well.


InukChinook

That last bit really hits home. My girlfriend has a 6 year old son who didn't discover he was deaf until he was 3 (doctors assumed he was autistic). She (and I) has been struggling with both becoming fluent in ASL as well as becoming teachers of it. We live in a fairly remote town with schools that don't have near enough special education resources to help us. Folks around here seems to assume that you can beat a kid into knowing right from wrong without any way to explain anything to them. I'm worried we won't be able to teach him ASL fast enough and he'll become the "deaf and dumb" of the old days.


superhappymegagogo

So you, as adults, likely won't ever be fluent in ASL unless you're either a) extremely talented, or b) extremely (inhumanly) dedicated. BUT children are very, very good at learning language, even in the absence of perfect teachers. He's young enough that with your imperfect efforts and consistent interaction with others who are fluent (even if not all the time), he can become fluent. He does need to be in speech therapy though (not to learn speech, but to help y'all learn ASL together), and there are virtual sessions available if your town doesn't have the resources he needs (and if you can't move to better support him). Try to find him a Deaf pen pal (via video chat) too. This is a crucial age, though. Linguists estimate that up until about 7/8 (or maybe up to 12yo for some children) an absence of early teaching won't impact lifelong fluency, as long as children are exposed to and can communicate in some language. So there's hope, you can do this together, but there is some urgency. I wish you all the best!


atypicalphilosopher

I mean it straight up says in the article that she started to show improvement and even learn words until she was abused again and literally tortured for trying to speak. And yet they still cite Genie as an example of someone being unable to learn language after a certain point. Wtf were these idiot scientists thinking?


brash

> When she was approximately 20 months old, her father began keeping her in a locked room. During this period, he almost always strapped her into a child's toilet or bound her in a crib with her arms and legs immobilized, forbade anyone from interacting with her, provided her with almost no stimulation of any kind, and left her severely malnourished. God how can someone do that to their own child, much less any baby that small


dumpster_arsonist

WTF is wrong with people. Did you get this far: >Soon after turning 18, Genie returned to live with her mother, who decided after a few months that she could not adequately care for her. Authorities then moved her into the first of what would become a series of institutions for disabled adults, and the people running it cut her off from almost everyone she knew and subjected her to extreme physical and emotional abuse. As a result, her physical and mental health severely deteriorated, and her newly acquired language and behavioral skills very rapidly regressed. Why??? How can this possibly happen? They "save" this girl in order to start rehabilitation and then feed her to the wolves???? What the actual FUCK


lawrencelewillows

IIRC the head psychologist who had spent the most time with her wasn’t even allowed to see her in that new place. He tried for a long time to visit her, not sure if he ever managed to.


pieswithplugs

I heard a horror story when I was away in programs about places in Maryland that took kids away from bad parents (understandably). But the places they put these kids. I don't wanna share too much of this persons detail but they would record and bet on the foster kids fighting. She eventually got clean and won him back in court. Hopefully staying clean. I still remember that place and area I hope it's not the same.


Beat9

I remember hearing a few years back about some sort of fucked up foster home fight club thing. Some people are just evil.


WeWillBeMillions

Society, civilization as a whole, failed that human being.


Sweet-ride-brah

Reading shit like this really reminds you that people do fall through the cracks, and not that I needed any reminder, but jesus, look after your own Edit: since I got so many replies, I’m saying look after your own as in double check on that family friend, neighbour, relative, go the extra mile- I’m *not* saying exclusively care about your own, and F everyone else. That wasn’t what I meant


atypicalphilosopher

This is someone who made world wide news. One of the only recorded cases of anything like this. And she still "fell through the cracks". The scientists dropped the ball on this one. All of the government too.


egalroc

Only in nonfiction does the storyline go~ *"And it gets worse."*


brash

Yeah I read the whole thing, it's all pretty heartbreaking


gpyrgpyra

Because they are extremely mentally ill. He also beat his wife throughout all of her pregnancies. Seems like nothing was off limits


born-to-ill

>Genie's father mostly grew up in orphanages in the American Pacific Northwest. His father died of a lightning strike, and his mother ran a brothel while only infrequently seeing him. Additionally, his mother gave him a feminine first name which made him the target of constant derision. As a result, he harbored extreme resentment toward his mother during childhood, which Genie's brother and the scientists who studied Genie believed was the root cause of his subsequent anger problems. > When Genie's father reached adulthood he changed his first name to one which was more typically masculine, and his mother began to spend as much time with him as she could. He became almost singularly fixated on his mother, despite having relentless arguments over her attempts to convince him to adopt a less rigid lifestyle, and therefore came to treat all other relationships as secondary at best. > Although Genie's parents initially seemed happy to those who knew them, soon after they married he prevented his wife from leaving home and beat her with increasing frequency and severity > Genie's father disliked children and wanted none of his own, finding them noisy, but around five years into their marriage his wife became pregnant. Although he beat his wife throughout the pregnancy, and near the end attempted to strangle her to death, she gave birth to an apparently healthy daughter. Her father found her cries disturbing and placed her in the garage, where she caught pneumonia and died at the age of ten weeks. I mean, dude was a real piece of work. Pretty positive he’d get an axis 1 diagnosis if he ever found his way in front of a provider. But he made the choices to mistreat people based on his insecurities all on his own. So it certainly shouldn’t be taken by anyone as a blanket association with being mentally ill, which is a huge spectrum of people, most of whom never harm anyone.


AskAboutMyCoffee

A piece of work is what you'd call someone who yells when their chicken nuggets are cold at the cashier. This dude is a psychotic piece of shit.


Bill_Brasky01

Hard agree. Yeah, his abuse is a result of being mistreated himself, but if you believe in hell, he should go there. What a fuck.


foggy-sunrise

It's kinda nuts how *okay* everyone is considering how unchecked a lot of these things were for so long. I mean, well... Hmm. Maybe it makes sense, actually.


FernFromDetroit

And what happened to this asshole? Hopefully he rotted to death in prison or was put to death. Mentally ill or not.


agent_raconteur

He committed suicide after Genie was rescued


ineedcoffeealready

He knew what he was doing. Mental illness or not, dude fucking knew what he was doing and loved to have power over people. Absolute scum.


Fireblade09

Jesus. Even after being rescued, she continued to be abused while she was an adult. People suck man.


Flounder134

So you’re telling me Tarzan is a load of shit. My childhood is a lie


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DoJax

Tarzan only knew how to speak ape, he could only speak a little to the other animals. I have not read that book in years, but I kind of want to go back and read it now.


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austinchan2

It was translated. You see him speaking ape to the animals and then learning English from Jane.


DoJax

I don't really remember, I know in the book it was a combination of grunts and movements that he used to communicate to the apes, probably just regular english for an easy to understand kids movie, but probably made ape sounds when outsiders viewed from them.


aznkupo

Not in Tarzan, they had a montage of Tarzan learning English.


GrgeousGeorge

Essentially yes


FLWeedman

George of the jungle is a true story though.


zarnovich

I love watching the clips wher Chomsky talks about this stuff. It makes me genuinely curious if there aren't more functions (kinesthetic and sports, emotional intelligence, vocal performance, artistic/creative expression in various mediums, etc.) that have similar factors. The comparison would be how if you learn a second language at 30 how it's fundamentally different than the natural learning characterized by the Genie example. I'm sympathetic to the argument the same applies to a child raised playing a sport or engaging in certain creative activities, though I've never seen anything on that (and thus don't know if it's at all true).


gpyrgpyra

To a certain degree this is the case. Kids naturally love it when you swing them around in circles and throw them in the air, because it is important for their development. Also jumping on trampolines and those spinny things on playgrounds It helps to develop their proprioception (being able to sense where your body is in space) and balance/coordination. So probably a child who didn't get tossed around or get to jump and flip and spin will be naturally less coordinated and 'athletic' than kids who did those things. I do not know if it is as serious as language, ie all or nothing . If someone does know and can add, that would be very interesting


TheLucidCrow

This is exactly why pre-K is so important for kids. The soft social skills they learn playing with others are hard to develop later. Just simple stuff like taking turns, recognizing when you hurt someone, respecting people's personal space, etc. It's all very hard to learn later.


superkp

psych students too. It's horrible that whenever a feral child is discovered, they are almost guaranteed to be put into the care of someone that will exploit their situation for profit or fame.


munk_e_man

I dont know if its fair to compare psych students to feral children, but I guess I can see where you're coming from.


EmperorLlamaLegs

Definitely fair. I've known too many psych students.


ManInBlack829

I was sitting here thinking, "Like *Freudians*?"


doc_witt

You just couldn't wait to slip that in there


Necr0mancrr

Ah, the old reddit [Student-a-roo!](https://www.reddit.com/r/facepalm/comments/po6ji4/us_healthcare/hd422ft/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app&utm_name=iossmf&context=3)


Dubcekification

I don't know about that. Feral children are rare, very rare. So when they are found it doesn't matter who works with them they are going to get attention and we as humans want to learn about the situation because it's a forbidden experiment. You can't find out what a human is like in a feral state unless you happen to find one. And I don't know how "famous" the people are who work with feral kids; most people don't even know about these cases or if they do they couldn't name the kid let alone the people who work with them. I could be wrong about this but I don't think so. If you have evidence to the contrary I'm open to learning.


robinhoodhere

Good god that was depressing to read through


gencoloji

I really wonder what a person like this would think like. Not in words, but in what? Pictures, feelings, expressions? When you see something, and think about why it is here, you actually think in words. Possible without language?


gpyrgpyra

Concepts and feelings. But also a lot of confusion. Language is an essential part of being a human and words (including signs) help us to understand all the things going on in our heads


diggs4ever

I feel so bad for children who were abused to an extreme level. I was a victim of horendous child abuse and I must say it shapes you and the demons never leave. It makes me a bad parent as well because I cant bring myself to punish my children for wrong doings.


gpyrgpyra

I'm sorry you went through that. You're probably doing your best and aren't as bad a parent as you think. You should still teach your kids right from wrong tho. But no need to yell/intimidate/physically harm/deprive them of things to do so. Best of luck to you, friend


PNW4theWin

My husband struggles with this. I reframed the approach as "coaching". I don't really believe in "punishment" myself, but coaching a child by saying, "This is the behavior I expect" or "This is the behavior I reward" is a better mindset to me.


FuckOffImCrocheting

You should try and get some help. Either through therapy or support groups. Abuse is a terrible thing to deal with but if you can't bring yourself to do basic parenting you doing harm to your kids just in a different way than was done to you. They could have trouble with relationships, holding jobs, even basic learning in a school environment where they're held to standard. I wish you luck in your journey friend. Look into the book Toxic Parents by Doctor Susan Forward. A friend of mine gave it a glowing review. She said it's a hard read because of the material so trigger warning there but she said it really helped her with her fear of perpetuation.


thekittysays

Have a look at Gentle Parenting, books by Sarah Ockwell Smith, Alfie Kohn, the How To Talk.. series and The Book you Wish Your Parents Had Read are all good. I mention these because the talk about authoritative parenting (not authoritarian) which places boundaries but doesn't reward and punish in the traditional sense. Not punishing doesn't make you a bad parent, it can be a really good way of parenting if done right. I'm sorry for what you went through as a child, I hope you are able to find some peace from it.


wildvision

You are obviously doing a much better job than your parents so you broke the chain - congrats! Rather than punish, get creative. Sometimes I ask my kids if their kid was doing this, wouldn't they respond in the same way? Let them understand that some of their choices were wrong themselves and they will push back less than if it's just a harsh punishment. I think you are on a good path.


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irishspice

He committed suicide when he was found out. He was a monster and a coward.


stupidrobots

I hope it hurt


irishspice

Me too.


FlameGoddess

From the Wiki about her: "News of Genie reached major media outlets on November 17, receiving a great deal of local and national attention, and the one photograph authorities released of Genie significantly fueled public interest in her.\[5\]\[59\]\[60\] Although Genie's father refused to speak to police or the media, large crowds subsequently went to try to see him, which he reportedly found extremely difficult to handle. On November 20, the morning before a scheduled court appearance on child abuse charges, he committed suicide by gunshot.\[22\]\[61\]\[59\] Police found two suicide notes, one intended for his son which in part said, "Be a good boy, I love you", and one directed at police. One note—sources conflict as to which—contained the declaration, "The world will never understand."\[12\]\[62\]\[59\]"


veRGe1421

There are incredibly sensitive developmental periods earlier in life, where if you don't get the adequate stimulation and nutrition in that time, there are potential lifelong consequences or limitations to the development of that area afterwards.


jusfng

Not sure how accurate Wikipedia is but says he never learned to speak but was a heavy smoker and died of tuberculosis. Now I'm curious if he picked up the habit from watching others or if someone introduced him to smoking. If wolves had opposing thumbs and access to smoke, would they? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dina\_Sanichar


DribsFlantoosey

Remember that smoking was just a thing people did back then, similar to drinking coffee today. The person who introduced him to smoking surely thought they were giving him the appearance of civility, of being a modern man.


deadheffer

The fact that you need to make this comment demonstrates how young the average redditor is. It’s been nearly 2 decades since indoor smoking was banned in many places.


yaboyfriendisadork

My mother literally smoked on airplanes and now I feel old


Change4Betta

Wolves would 100% smoke if they could. Source: it just seems like they would, cmon


d_marvin

Wolves: Cigarettes Foxes: Vape Hyenas: Meth


Change4Betta

This makes me want to go through the animal kingdom assigning preferred drugs. Giraffes - long stem cigarettes like cruella Hippos - pcp mixed with opium Sloth - just fucking opium all day


Supahflii

Sloths def smoke weed


thoriginal

Your mini is messed up https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dina_Sanichar


Seebass802

I mean, I know monkeys have become chain smokers before so it seems like the thumbs are the main thing stopping them


i_know_cat_fu

This is going back to an undergraduate course I took in psycholinguistics 15+ years ago, but humans have this innate but limited window of 2-3? years to learn language the first time. Once past, language cannot be properly learned.


AaruIsBoss

Yea it’s called the critical window and it’s at toddler stage of life. Miss it and you can never learn to speak.


x2040

I saw this most with deaf students at my college. The ones that went deaf after the age of 5 had way better communication skills than those before the age of 5 or from birth.


wgel1000

>I saw this most with dead students at my college. What kind of college is this?


yomerol

Yeah dead students can't communicate unless your name is Cole /S


StrategicBean

Doesn’t this beg the question of how the first language began? Did every generation’s grunts get more and more refined until words started?


lllllll______lllllll

Duolingo?


StrategicBean

Seems legit lol


MusicianMadness

I have also always wondered how did anyone ever become the first to be fluent in a second language. It is obvious that you can start to pick things up. If I point at something and keep calling it by its name in a language a non-native speaker will learn what it means. But how does anyone ever teach grammatical rules, idioms, etc to someone without knowing anything about their native language?


FishGoBlupBlup

Probably incremental steps that each successive generation built off of. Like pointing or making specific noises for specific nouns/dangerous things probably evolves. I also wonder if a group of children grew up like this would the social interaction create a new language. Maybe it's not that they couldn't learn language, but that they hadn't learned the ability communicate because of social isolation.


rockyrikoko

What about learning additional languages? Is there a cut off for that as well?


Anti-Iridium

No. Because at that point you're not learning how language and verbal communication works, you're learning the language itself.


i_know_cat_fu

IIRC, once a person learns language the first time, any language, during this crucial window, our brains are primed to use and learn new languages for the rest of our lives. There’s this critical phase of brain development triggered by learning a language’s grammar.


elmz

Makes you wonder, what other things could the brain be wired to learn if we exposed children to it? . ^(Brb, building my kid an F1 training simulator.)


tangerinehead024

Approximately 1 year! Within those 12 months, babies are capable of being able to recognize and eventually produce all phonemes across all languages. Just depends on why they’re exposed to! [By 6 months, babies begin to babble and coo and this is the first sign that the baby is learning a language. Babies are now capable of making all the sounds in all the languages of the world, but by the time they are a year old, they will have dropped the sounds that aren’t part of the language they are learning.](https://www.verywellfamily.com/how-do-children-learn-language-1449116)


trolololoz

So theoratically could you play random languages on YouTube so the baby doesn't drop other sounds?


fakeflake182

All languages, except Danish


I_think_were_out_of_

That's why programs like Head Start are so important.


TheITMan8

That’s why good education and socialization are important.


Malapple

And access to a healthy diet.


Skygazer90

This is sad. Apparently he couldn’t make any friends at the orphanage he was taken to but there was a dog that befriended him.


Obstacle616

Saddest thing is that apparently he wasn't the only ferral child at that orphanage and there were other orphanages that took only children like this. Apparently it was a common problem at one point.


O_Apples

I wonder if children raised by different animals could tell what the other children were raised by.


MajorInflator

One day AI will be good enough and we would be able to perform simulations like this without harming a soul


LeggoMyAhegao

Or we are the simulation. Deja-vu is just the world sorting out threading issues.


wiarumas

I'm not sure about the dog, but I know that he befriended another orphan that was raised by animals. They both communicated in grunts and connected on some primal level.


HanEyeAm

But could he understand and communicate in wolf? Could he identify sounds of anger, distress, intrusion, whatever wolves talk about?


wiarumas

I'd assume so, but I don't think anyone knows to what extent. They killed the wolves and I doubt they let him meet any others. >Sanichar shared many of the qualities that child psychologist Wayne Dennis would note in his 1941 American Journal of Psychology paper, “The Significance of Feral Man:” “Feral man is untidy,” and would “eat things that civilized man considers disgusting,” Dennis wrote. Sanichar only ate meat, despised wearing clothes, and sharpened his teeth on bones. Though he appeared to have no capacity for language, he was not mute, making animal noises instead. Feral children were, as Dennis explained, “Insensitive to heat and cold” and had “little or no attachment to human beings.” Sanichar did, however, form a bond with one human: another feral child who had been brought to the orphanage. Father Erhardt said of the pair, “A strange bond of sympathy attached these two boys together, and the elder one first taught the younger to drink out of a cup.” This would prove true for many feral children: after spending their formative years in the animal kingdom, they could more easily relate to animals. ​ >...wolf children seemed not really like people at all: “The view that men outside society are not really men is lent yet more weight by the fact that peculiarly human traits like laughing and smiling are totally absent in wild children.” https://timeline.com/dina-sanichar-feral-children-ea9f5f3a80b2


Something22884

Wow, I always thought laughter was universal; smiling too. Guess not


alx429

Malcolm Gladwell actually discuss this in his Strangers book. Apparently pretty much all of our facial expressions are actually learned as well.


F1reatwill88

Having a kid is eye opening in this regard. Watching them have to work out all these seemingly "instinctual" things is wild.


Sodernaut

How common were feral / wild children? The article references it so casually.


CozImDirty

You ever see a frog kid?!


boringcarpets

Shangai'd to a nitwit school


notyourusername1776

Omg they murdered his wolf family


ucsb99

Yeah I caught that too. Sounds f\*cking terrible.


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waklow

because it was the 1800s


nOstopS_NZ

If this photo is genuinely him you can see his mouth is tightly closed as showing teeth is a sign of agression for wolves and my guess is he never showed teeth. Edited by to my


_MFBroom

Would imagine body language is slightly universal?


cfishlips

Reading his story he may have been better off continuing to live with the wolves.


Skygazer90

I thought the same


pletskoo_

I mean it makes sense, he can't talk to anyone but he grew up with wolves for 7 years, so i assume it would be easier to befriend a dog


White-hat82

I was a foster parent and had a little boy come to my home who was so feral and neglected that he and his siblings actually made up their own language. He stayed 3 years, and in the end could speak and read and write, but still lacked a lot of social skills and had some severe behaviors at times.


8nfinite8

Would like to know if between him and his siblings, were they able to show emotions through their language they had made up or was it more like communication just to help with doing tasks etc. Could they form their own kind of jokes and laugh at one another for example?


White-hat82

No they didn't really show emotion with each other apart from anger. To us it sounded like jibberish but they would repeat the same words and were able to communicate with each other, at least in a rudimentary fashion.


helgaofthenorth

I'm having a hard time finding something to cite but I remember reading about how different sign languages develop in Deaf communities around the world because people have an inherent need to communicate with each other. Like there's a chunk of our brains that will figure it out if there's other people to communicate with, it's how we're wired. It's fascinating, but so sad that we lose it if we don't start early.


meh273

Served in Peace Corps where I saw this first hand. Local school took in some deaf kids thrown out by their parents and who'd never been taught sign language, but they made up their own language and absolutely communicated with each other. The teachers, including myself, were able to learn the basics just by them communicating with us, but they were fluent with each other.


ImReallyWalterWhite

I’m a pediatric trauma therapist. Thank you for what you did. You were a key role in saving that child’s life. Know that I think you’re a hero.


NinthLife9

No ur Walter White


SeegsonSynthetics

Tread lightly.


Soaznei

Very interesting article about him: [https://allthatsinteresting.com/dina-sanichar](https://allthatsinteresting.com/dina-sanichar)


autopsis

“Some say he even picked up the most human trait of all: smoking cigarettes.”


Joeshmo04

I laughed at this


Cimrin

Holy shit that is fascinating. He truly was raised by wolves. I did not think that would be possible. He walked in all fours and everything. I can’t believe this really happened. History is insane


NoLog5069

It says in the article that they can’t be sure he was actually raised by wolves. It could have been made up and he just had an intellectual disability.


NeatGift906

Yeah, why didn't the wolves eat him?


bostonaliens

And how did they feed him? Did he eat raw meat after the hunt? Did he drink a mother wolves milk? Did he figure out how to survive on nuts and berries? Doesn’t add up.


Flobking

> And how did they feed him? Did he eat raw meat after the hunt? A lot of meats can be eaten raw that fresh. It isn't until it sits around that it becomes dangerous. He would no doubt be full of parasites and other maladies.


mrsbebe

Yeah and it literally says in the article that he insisted on eating raw meat so...


QuintusVS

plus the fact he sniffed any food first and if he didn't like it he wouldn't eat it. sounds like he had a more instinctual sense of determining by smell whether something was edible. most of us will easily eat something that has gone off without realizing, because we've lost the need to rely on our animal instincts.


[deleted]

Didn't you watch the Jungle Book? He probably ate bananas and sang songs with bears.


4trevor4

The article says he did eat raw meat, and in the beginning at least communicated in howls and snarls


Belostoma

Also this: >Interestingly enough, Sanichar was not the only wolf child living at the Sikandra Mission Orphanage at the time. If superintendent Lewis is to be believed, he was joined by two other boys and one girl who were also said to have been raised by wolves. I could maybe buy there maaaaaaybe being *one* wolf pack somewhere that for whatever strange quirk of personality decided to be nice to the little human they found, although it seems very unlikely. Wolves have been known to develop odd relationships with other, would-be prey animals for amusement. Happening so routinely that one orphanage brings in many such children? No way. Not possible. Maybe the parents abused the kid, kept him in the yard with dogs, and made up the wolf story when they ditched him for good at the orphanage. Maybe he had only been feral for a short time after being abused and was slowly starving to death in a cave previously occupied by wolves when he was found. Maybe his story was semi-authentic and others copied it as a fraud.


Nayre_Trawe

I guess even wolf packs need side hustles nowadays.


Justinbiebspls

atlantic: how the modern economy forgot about wolfpacks


MedTechSpurs

I find it hard to believe also. Human babies are really quite useless. Wolf babies are pretty functional from a very young age. I doubt wolf parents would have the patience or the capacity to carry around and care for a human baby.


world_of_cakes

if a mother animal has recently given birth it's so flooded with hormones it can start to think any baby animal nearby is her own. they use this trick in animal husbandry all the time when they need to give a baby to a different mother. Occasionally it's been observed in the wild to happen cross-species. One example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=570khFoaE4s Another: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0O1Dp2cocQ


MaterialCarrot

I want the next Disney remake to have Mowgli look just like this guy.


ShovelUpandGame

He’s super realistic and everything else is the normal Disney bubbly happiness.


eye_of_the_sloth

like the people at the orphanage break out into a song but mowgli is seen just takin a shit like a coyote


Turribletoberman

the eyes, the whole time and no talking, screeching


suburban_hyena

Interesting difference with [this man](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcos_Rodr%C3%ADguez_Pantoja) who lived with wolves from 7 till 19, survived till 70 something and was able to communicate and live like a normal human.


Amused-Observer

Difference is that he had 7 years of regular human development. In that time you learn language, writing, reading, walking, talking. Sooooo much of you is built in your first 3-5 years of life.


Geryth04

Even that first 12 months matters a lot. My son was born with Dwarfism (achondroplasia) and his ears were filled with fluid as a result, which distorted everything he heard in that time. Somewhere around 8 months (IIRC) he got tubes put in his ears to fix that problem, but it was too late, his speech was greatly effected by that fluid and distorted hearing early in his life, and at 5 years old he still struggles with his own speech and is in speech therapy.


TumorBoyTim

I love that he says he’s “disappointed with human nature” and just wants to go back to living in the mountains


cjpack

For everyone asking about his hair being cut. This was taken 20 years after he was found by hunters (found in 1867, photo is from 89-93 reports say). So this is the "civilized" version of him, can only imagine how rough he must have looked before. Edit: holy shit ten year anniversary as a redditor and turning thirty the same year. Idk which makes me feel older.


millst01

You can tell it’s after a period of time being cared for by people because he’s wearing shorts.


boosh92

Imagine being the hunters who found him. Would have been a crazy thing to see


Damassteel_ironworks

I'm going out on a limb here and say they should've left him with the wolves. That would probably be a short life but certainly happier than on that photo.


Turribletoberman

makes you think we were only 2 to 5 years of neglect away from being closer to animals than "humans". interesting


flamethekid

Crazy isn't it? And once we hit that stage of being closer to animals at a young age, we are essentially stuck and unable to progress normally as a human for the rest of our lives. All these feral children live the rest of their lives unable to understand society the way the rest of us can whether the good or the bad.


Mattacus89

Everything else aside, it's incredible to me that a pack of wolves were like "Yeah you're alright, you can chill." Like surely he's food on any other day, but that day they decided to just keep a pet human around.


ripecantaloupe

There are instances of other species making friends outside their own species. A cheetah (I think) cared for a baby gazelle for a while until it got hunted by another animal. It was really sad to watch, don’t go looking for that story.


Will_W

I mean that’s where domestic dogs came from, right? Some humans were just like “actually these wolves are awesome, have some grub, pal” when historically they might have been just as likely to hunt the wolves like any other animal. Feral humans is basically the same relationship, though maybe in reverse.


-_-usernames

I mean we keep dogs as pets in some places and other places see them as food


Toadster64209

Well I just went down a 1.5 hour rabbit hole investigating feral children. That was fun.


Olebaer

Wow, is there a documentary on Sina Sanichar??


WorkingContext

Not about this dude but check out the documentary Mischa and The Wolves on Netflix. It's wild.


peppermintvalet

Unfortunately, feral kids usually have a very difficult life and often die young. Genie comes to mind.


bricksundae

Genie’s actually still alive, apparently in a care home in California. Edit: Supposedly still alive, last confirmation was 2016.


Atheris__

Read about her. So tragic. I hope she’s doing well and at peace.


mcsteiny

Genie who? Interested.


stfupcakes

Genie the [feral girl](https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genie_(feral_child)


mcsteiny

Thanks


MidTownMotel

Evidently it isn’t an ideal situation for becoming a well adjusted adult. Weird.


rabidwombat

The orphanage had a track record of producing similar "feral" children. It's more likely he was a mentally handicapped victim of abuse, than actually raised by animals.