T O P

Sometimes the world of fantasy is a little TOO realistic

Sometimes the world of fantasy is a little TOO realistic

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F-F-Ivanovsky

A well made, high-quality meme that touches on actual DnD problems while referencing a great show? Get outta here, we only want shitty prequel memes and to misspell the word rogue.


TheFirstPancake101

My sincerest apologies. I didn’t mean to offend


Offbeat-Pixel

*rouge


Stab-o

Roag*


CommieTortoise

Rug**


eschybach

Roagh


Pas9816

R


sociisgaming

I would actually be ok seeing this, because for once I'd know it was intentional. Or, hope... Really, really hope...


2ManyLizards

This scene is just living with adhd


MyPhoneIsNotChinese

Honestly that doesn't sound that bad for a tutorial quest of a game.


OverlyBoredHuman

Malcolm in The Middle is welcome anywhere


kismethavok

This scene is probably the most accurate representation of an average D&D campaign ever made, and I'm sure it was purely unintentional.


Alexandria_maybe

This clip is just a summary of adhd


Crazed_Gentleman

This is fucking hilarious! Thank you!


TheFirstPancake101

No need to thank me, I’m just trying to give back to the meme community


Justbrowsingthrow

I feel ... weirdly personally attacked


sprocketlordandsavio

What’s this from


TheFirstPancake101

Malcolm in the middle


FaolCroi

Anybody got a link to the original video? I never watched the show so I have no idea what to search for.


stx06

[Here is Hal fixing a light bulb in "Malcom in the Middle."](https://youtu.be/AbSehcT19u0)


eschybach

The show is pure gold, highly recommend it.


Akadmia

Yes. I want more Malcolm in the DnD memes.


Bobby-Bobson

u/savevideo


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BrozedDrake

Who tf does "Adventuring Licences"? Like seriously I have trouble thinking of a legit reason for it or any examples of it outside of a gag comic.


TheFirstPancake101

Well the way I see it is you’ve essentially got a group of mercenaries that go do dangerous and violent things in or near towns/cities so by having an adventuring license you’re basically deputizing them similar to a sheriff in the old west deputizing some of the locals. It’s just a way for governments to keep themselves in the loop and hire “contractors” to complete things that they wouldn’t want or can’t do themselves


BrozedDrake

It's simply a concept that I don't think would work in most fantasy settings. For reasons ranging from how prolific monsters may be to how difficult it would be to actually enforce such an edict. It doesn't help that free companies were generally not kept in check by any nations they operated in, so the mercenary comparison doesn't quite work for this either. Yeah in the American Frontier you would get times a posse of individuals was deputized to track and catch/kill a criminal, but that would only be temporary and also wouldn't quite apply to adventurers. The only D&D setting I can think of that has a strong enough legal system and ridiculous things that need to be licensed is Glantri, and their laws are ridiculous enough that invisible stalkers need the proper paperwork to be invisible. If you manage to make it work without it feeling forces more power to you, I just don't see how it really can.


TheFirstPancake101

It’s the same concept as a privateer. They were just government sanctioned pirates; groups paid by the government to do things (typically dangerous and violent) and a license could give the party access to places that most normal civilians wouldn’t have access too. Like if they needed to speak to the local government leaders they wouldn’t have to wait for some weekly council meeting, they’d just show their paperwork and would be treated with a highly level of importance. It makes sense in a fantasy setting because with the fief system of government, you’d be traveling from town to town and a license would notify the local Lord that you are acting on behalf of the kingdom and that’s where your “authority” is derived from. When traveling in that day and age this kind of thing was usually done by a Lord signing some letter saying that they are doing what they’ve been paid to do and required a stamp of whatever house/kingdom/fiefdom had originally hired them


BrozedDrake

Thats a writ, and is something that would only be given for you to do a single job, which would most likely be explained in said writ. They wouldn't give you broad authority over a general, and I mean very general, type of work, they give you authority to do a particular task. Again, an aspect that does not require licences. As for the privateer thing, almost all famous pirates were privateers at some point, and often only called privateers by the countries they worked for. And, again, their job was more specific than what an adventuring party does, privateers were hired to attack the ships and trade of rival nations, particularly in the Caribbean. Also, didn't need a license, just needed a boat and some weapons.


RemissNycarae

privateering did actually require a license, and each capture was inspected by a court to make sure it was legal, and if not than the collateral the group that purchased/operated the privateering vessel put up would be confiscated by the government and the capture would be returned to the legal owners. Source: there's a recreation of a privateer vessel that comes by my town a few times a year and they talk about this stuff


TheFirstPancake101

A writ could apply to an entire campaign seeing as it involves a long term goal. No matter how you put it, adventurers are government sanctioned mercenaries and it makes sense to have an “adventuring” license


BrozedDrake

Just saying "no matter how you put it" doesn't make your statement true. Mercenary companies never needed licenses to be active historically speaking, adventuring as such a broad job that it would be very difficult to regulate in such a manner anyway, and in fact no jobs required a license until the 1900s, the first that started requiring one being medicine.


TheFirstPancake101

Paramilitary organizations have been hired by governments for years. I don’t understand why you can’t grasp the concept of a government wanting to have a system in place to keep tabs on a group of powerful and dangerous individuals. Of all the insane things in a fantasy setting, apparently a license is too unrealistic.


StaryWolf

Similar to hunting licenses I guess? Make sure a group of random psychopaths don't go wrecking the ecosystem by killing every mean looking creature within a hundred miles radius. And to better and more fairly manage bounties on monsters and claims to dungeons, like you have a guild and you need a license to be part of the guild, that way people have a centralized way to claim bounties and dole out rewards.


BetaBerserker

In Waterdeep it takes around 16 guilds to build a house. If you build any part of it without guild involvement then the whole city will shun you. I think it is funny to extend this to an Adventuring guild that has exclusivity over helping those in need.


FrozenChops

If there is a group that is hiring out what are effectively mercenaries to solve other folks problems, it stands to reason that they will have some standards in place to ensure that they send the right people to the job, in order to not get backlash from the customer for a job done incorrectly. Freelance is fine, but until you make a name for yourself it would be a rather hard thing to keep consistent


BrozedDrake

That doesn't mean licences though, that simply mean, well making a name for yourself, by doing whatever jobs you get. A guild may have those standards that they use to determine who to send for what job, but an independent group wouldn't be beholden to that, and either way that has nought to do with a license. Mercenary companies didn't historically require licences either so the comparison doesn't help the "adventuring license" concept.


AlexStorm1337

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