T O P

Imagine if in the future the only people allowed to succeed are the best doctors and engineers and programmers while the rest get ignored.

Imagine if in the future the only people allowed to succeed are the best doctors and engineers and programmers while the rest get ignored.

Jtrav91

This is closer to the techno-dystopia I imagine if everyone continues to remain passive through collapse and it's business as usual.


ChefGoneRed

Not gonna happen. We're nowhere close to the technology needed. We've got maybe 20 years before the effects of climate change begin to seriously degrade the command of resources available to nations like the US, and bodies like the EU. If they don't get fusion up and going, AI worked out, and full androids worked up by then, they're fucked. If they can't, 2050 is about when they'll have to start slashing R&D budgets and committing greater and greater resources to simply keeping the machine going. At that point, they're huddling towards systems collapse, and nothing can reverse that kind of collapse.


Jtrav91

I did say closer. Instead of AI automation, I'd expect these "corporate cities" allowing people to live there under terms of their employment. They'll extend a line of credit to pay for bills and food, carefully adjusting it to entrap you into being stuck and unable to get out of debt. Cheap, guaranteed employees that if done properly would ensure you have their descendents as replacements. Basically, I could see them bringing back the indentured servants.


Grumpkinns

This is what we have now


Jtrav91

Shhh, we don't talk about that.


rising-waters

The difference is some people are able to escape that kind of existence, for the moment.


StarChild413

Only if you engage in the same kind of semantic stretching that leads people to claim wage slavery and chattel slavery are the same


pwdpwdispassword

wage slavery is only one step in the spectrum away from chattel slavery.


Grumpkinns

Wage Slaves isn’t really a good term for it because people then think of how great we have it by comparison. I like to think of us working class as just “consumers”.


rising-waters

Back when chattel slavery was legal, many people considered wage slavery to be *even worse*.


AlphabetMafia8787

> carefully adjusting it to entrap you into being stuck and unable to get out of debt. "They" are already saying: "You won't own anything, but you'll be happy." Having to "rent/lease" your life will keep you in debt. There will be no way out.


Bonfalk79

Unfortunately both parts of that statement are not true.


PGLife

You are basically describing serfdom, so neofeudalism.


LoganMcWatt

I'm gonna go out on a limb here and assume you don't know very many engineers or programmers. They're completely useless without supply chains of thousands of people. Good luck without farmers, plumbers, and electricians. Also why would they even allow you to bring your family if resources are so scarce?


Importantmessage2000

I want to be an engineer They’d allow you because they need you and to workout a deal you’d be allowed to bring your family


LoganMcWatt

Nothing wrong with wanting to be an engineer. Just saying in order for them to have any value need lots and lots of workers from various other professions. So that in conjunction with them letting people take their families makes the premise moot. They wouldn't just be taking certain professions because they're useless without many many others. Ie programmers are useless without electricians and technicians


nohopesmokedope420

sup, I'm a mechanical engineer. I don't really think anything quite like this could happen but it is interesting to think about. ​ In this scenario I think they would want a few doctors and engineers around but it wouldn't be like a whole society of only those professions. I imagine it would just be a regular society of a bunch of rich people with some kind of private military.


AlphabetMafia8787

> Consumerism won’t be necessary anymore since corporations will have the technology and resources to sustain themselves and stay alive. They will have AI workers and nobody to sue them. They will have bought politicians to ease on the restrictions and “let the market be free” What will they be producing and who will they be producing for?


madamlazonga

You’re describing brazil. Brazil already exists


ItyBityGreenieWeenie

The film, or the country? ;-)


moon-worshiper

Great movie, wonder how many people get the satire about out of control bureaucracy. Fly falls from the ceiling, changes Tuttle to Buttle on the Termination order.


BadAsBroccoli

"won’t be able to leave the city with luxurious walls" When people ask these questions, I think of Epstein's Island, where the rich had everything they wanted, regardless of law, social morals, or individual conscience, and I know our future will play out no differently. The Haves will have, and the Have-Nots will serve them, voluntarily or involuntarily. No cataclysm or technological miracle has ever nor will ever change the basic character, the foibles and graces, of the human race.


SeppW

Novels by Neal Stephenson touch on the themes of class, social status, and technology. I recommend Snow Crash and The Diamond Age. As another commenter said, techno-dystopia (unless you're on the top rung).


LanWanThankYouMaam

This sounds a lot like the world of Margaret Atwood’s novel, Oryx & Crake.


CytheYounger

I was going to say this.


queefaqueefer

barring everything else in your post, life kinda already feels like that.


Meandmystudy

Cyberpunk was a lot like this even though it wasn't a great game because of all the glitches. Still fun to play though. When you get into the game you discover that the "corpo's" own the city. They live in the nice part of the city, while the majority of the population lives on "Eurodollars" sent electronically to their neural implants. What I find funny is that it is already ending up that way. Even an office worker/engineer/data entry specialist/doctor/STEM field employee has a better job then a gas station employee and a burger flipper. Meanwhile I'm getting the sense that they despise them in some way. I'd like to say the US is just as classist as anywhere else, but I think it is even more so between the haves and have nots. Meanwhile those with good jobs will do anything to hang on to it short of killing someone because of how tight and competitive the labour market is. They have to justify their position in the company like the movie Office Space where one of the employees says that he takes the TPS reports and delivers them to another desk. Some office jobs must have already been bullshit by then if that movie was made in the late nineties. I really think Jenniffer Aniston's character was real because she had all that flair. I went to Cost Cutters this past Wednesday and say a woman sitting at the counter with all of her flair arranged on her shirt, so flair is a very real thing. I guess I had never seen it before or just failed to notice. I think she works at Friday's. Mike Judge has to be prophetic, because even though he didn't see a highly technical future, he started making his cartoons in the 80's and they were very much a story of what America was. So far we have a bunch of people trying to justify their jobs any way they can because they know that their work can be taken up by someone else, or their position will be permanently taken out of the company, nobody to take those TPS reports anymore. What I find funny is these people have to justify their jobs in some way, I think that's where the term "busy work" came from and I think that there are people that are particularly adept at it. Who knows, maybe the highest paid worker is in their office now starting at their computer or their wall doing absolutely nothing because they realize they are getting paid for it. But if it were truly a sci-fi dystopian world, we would take out social Darwanist policies and implement them over our whole lives, which I think we have already done. America is the "work or starve" place, the "meritocracy", the "might makes right". Since we have no national identity, I think it makes it all the more competitive. We will have people competing over lower wages even if it means they can work because "work or starve". The race to the bottom as people have shared. I saw a comment on Reddit by a Swedish person who remarked about American's paying for social welfare and how some American's don't want to pay taxes for "those people". His general comment was that he was so glad he never had to grow up in America because at least his ancestors knew that had to work with each other and not for each other. In American social Darwanist "meritocracy" you are always working *for* someone and not with each other. Years of corporate propaganda has wiped ant collective mindset from you.


Colorotter

This is exactly the future I’ve been thinking will happen. I’ve had an anxiety my whole life that not being in the tiptop of my “productivity” my whole life will get me thrown off the boat and fed to those who’d just see a faggot know-it-all. I’m a top engineer now. Life’s good, but psychologically speaking, the dystopia is here for most of us.


QuietClocks

And employees will fight for their jobs because of the life-sustaining "perks" that come with them. Back in the 1950's a very dark-humor sci fi novel was written about such a scenario titled "[Gladiator at Law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gladiator-At-Law)", by Pohl and Kornbluth.


TheLastCoagulant

AI is shit. AI can’t clean toilets or install a plumbing system. Even those McDonald’s ordering kiosks: They’ve had them for 6 years and every single McDonald’s I’ve walked into has had someone at the cash register. Before the kiosks came they had 1 person at the cash register, now they still have 1 person. Nobody got fired. AI is the modern cold fusion. I’m not believing shit until I walk into a full-sized McDonald’s restaurant that has less than 2 human employees. That’s the absolute bare minimum, according to AI doomers that already should’ve been profitable years ago but of course it doesn’t exist.


astrogoat

Ordering kiosks have nothing to do with AI. I agree though, many people on here vastly overestimate our current capabilities.


Catcatcatastrophe

Player Piano describes this type of society. Very worth the read


canibal_cabin

People like you seem to dismiss that, in a fully automated society, there wouldn't be "excess humans" in the first place.


Astalon18

Not going to happen for the next fifty years. AI is not as you imagine, we have not yet reached that level yet. Now once we reach a certain level of AI it might happen, but note what is the use of the best engineers and doctors if the AIs supersede them?


cmVkZGl0

This world was explored in syfy's "Incorporated"


moon-worshiper

Oh, don't ignore the stinky, dirty, ignorant Street Mob with their pitchforks and torches, crazed eyes, foaming at the mouth. Let them have their Tribunal of Worth, then let them sleep with the fishes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UJ6Ei3RtKM


StarChild413

Why does this feel like the sort of scenario where dystopian YA tropes can easily predict the ensuing consequences?


Bonfalk79

Isn’t this the subplot to hunger games?


Mighty_L_LORT

Your future is now...


lolpunny

Don't forget lawyers and politicians.


PlanExtreme

not much imagination required


Interesting-Read7924

Its good i will be dead before that


zedroj

Well you assume you aren't in your own prison, that's a big mistake


newlypolitical

You mean eugenics.


PervyNonsense

All of this stops working and, in case you haven't noticed, most of these professions are entirely reliant on either power or the internet, and those rely on parts. Doctors trained in the "developing world" would be useful, but will they be? This is an ecosystem of poverty devoted to a few wealthy people. To feed the rich, you need the poor. Robots can't evacuate when a factory burns down or get wipes out by a hurricane. They can't be replaced without parts. People have way too much faith in technology. It's really not as fancy as it looks, it's just a huge amount of resources that require a supply chain to get to where they need to be. We're already seeing the effects of the chip shortage on manufacturing and that's a trajectory, not an incident, because you can't fix a supply chain that relies on its own momentum to function.