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urannoyingmee

Not a Djiboutian but I know two atheist people from there and they’re both very secretive about it because they don’t want to upset their families. One of them moved to France and the other, the U.K. and they both feel the same about not wanting anyone to know


zoomerzhang

Very surprised Djiboutians would be hostile towards gaals. Alcohol is legal in Djibouti I always assumed they were moderate Muslims due to French colonialism.


urannoyingmee

According to an atheist Somali woman I know from Djibouti, she said they’re definitely more moderate but becoming more Islamist lately


UgaasWaqooyi

Depends what’s moderate to you. Alcohol is a taboo and it’s associated with people who are a “bad influence”. Sexual orientation and criticism of religion is a stretch by a wide margin.


urannoyingmee

I didn’t really ask her but I’m assuming she meant everyday day to day life, basically hijab, prayer, women working, music, concerts etc.


UgaasWaqooyi

Yh people don’t really care what you do but you have to be respectful of society there. It’s all Hakuna Matata. Only thing that you’ll get attacked fully for is being against the government


thewyhgyank

I met a lot of Somali Djiboutians when I was solo traveling in southern France. They are very much liberal and open minded even the ones that still identify as Muslim. A lot of the women don’t wear hijab since Wahhabist ideology didn’t reach Djibouti. Only married women wear head covering and even then it’s dirac or gabasaar without covering the hair. Many of the people I met were students so they were very much integrated into French culture and university life. I think there’s a big difference between anglophone(majority of Somalis) and francophone somalis. Especially in terms of culture. Also, I noticed a lot of the Djiboutian diaspora align themselves with other francophone speakers like west Africans rather than Arabs or Pakistanis. They’re very big on the Black & African identity. Furthermore, they’re less tribalist. They only identify as “Djiboutian” because they all come from the same clan. In Canada, the Somali community is so intermixed that I can’t tell who is Somali, Lander or Djiboutian but I know there is a large Somali Djiboutian community here.


UgaasWaqooyi

A lot of teenagers now wear the hijab or jilbaab to school. Back in the day though, non married women didn’t wear the hijab like my mother and her mother.


zoomerzhang

Just as I assumed! The French culture revivers liberalism which probably played a role in how the younger Djibouti diaspora views themselves and Islam, which is a good thing for atheist Somali women/man that want a Somali partner but are too scared they’ll become religious again (which is my fear as well). French Djiboutians will work lol! What part of France do most French Djiboutian reside? The Djiboutians you meet, were there any that were openly gaal? Like, do their parents know? Are they fine with it?


thewyhgyank

Majority of them live in the city of Marseille in southern France but also in the suburbs of Paris. The Somali Djiboutians have better chance of integrating since they speak the language compared to those coming from Somalia and settling in France. When I meet people I never really bring up religion but I remember them drinking alcohol & smoking shisha at the Tunisian owned lounges. So I’m assuming they’re not very strict with the religion. Yes, I definitely do think the French values of liberalism and secularism plays a huge role in many Francophone countries. I think language and culture are inherently tied.


rondo35

Your second point about Djiboutian identifying with West Africans more than Somali’s is just ludicrous beyond measure. I have many Djiboutian friends and in laws and visited that country, personally I have not seen much of a difference, especially in the diaspora. Oddly, I’ve found them to be somewhat what more religious, although I won’t be making sweeping generalisations based on my limited experience. I have not been to France though but it would make sense anyone brought up their would hold secular values, Djiboutian or not.


thewyhgyank

Reread what I wrote because I didn’t say they didn’t identify with Somalis. I clearly stated they identified more with Francophone West Africans more than Arabs or Pakistanis because of shared French and religion. West Africa has many Muslims who are also rooted in African traditions. If you been to France you would see the immense influence of Senegalese and other French-speaking West Africans in French society. Even the Algerians too. A lot of Francophone movies and TV shows include west Africans. Compared to Somalia, where it’s predominantly English, Turkish, Arab or Indian. Also many Djiboutians study & move to countries in Africa that speak French.


rondo35

Thanks I stand corrected on that part. But you are definitely way over exaggerating the impact of French culture on Djibouti. I have met many Djiboutian, not a single one could speak even broken French. There was a study done back in 2017 that a whopping 17k people in Djibouti spoke French. Go to Djibouti and see how many people speak French, personally I haven’t seen it.


UgaasWaqooyi

Knowing French is knowing you’ve had access to education in Djibouti.


rondo35

It’s stupid and shortsighted by the government to promote French. English has 1000x the return in value.


UgaasWaqooyi

🤫Why don’t you think people haven’t changed that yet? You really forgot about France’s grip on Africa have you? Can’t say much though…they’re watching.


Interesting-Print334

My parents are from Djibouti, but I'm raised in Touluse in the Occitanie region of France. Most of us Djiboutians in diaspora despise Arabs and have no affinity to them, many of us are also Protestant Christians, like my family and 4 other families I know in Touluse are Christians. Most of my friends are from Cote d' ivorie Senegal and Mali. I feel very fortunate to have been raised outside of Islam and the wrath of Wahhabism which spread like cancer in Somaliland and Somalia.


Throwaway546som

Djiboutians are not different then somalis in tribalism, They have issues between cisse themselves, also gadabursi and isaaq. A lot of them hate the mamassan clan of the president because they receive everything, Any djiboutian org in sweden falls apart due to this issue, Plus afar issues, They seem no different then other somalis in the way the react with blacks, Seem pretty much neautral towards them


UgaasWaqooyi

I’m not a Wahabbi myself but I am a Djiboutian and I currently live here. Wahhabism is on the rise, I know plenty of family friends who have become such.😂 I asked them why? They said Wahabbi Islam is the true Islam.


urannoyingmee

Why is it on the rise?


UgaasWaqooyi

Access to the internet means Wahabbi sources can be easily accessed.


Top_Produce_6505

Djiboutian,Somali,Somalilanders we are all somalis but i've realized from 8 yrs ago they're not as extreme muslims as the others somalis but wallahi idk walaalo


zoomerzhang

Do you feel like landers are more inclined to be moderate Muslims? I think so. Landers pride themselves in combating terrorism and radical Islam in their territories. Landers are also continually called British boot lickers and gaal raac on twitter because they’re paying tribute to British colonial soldiers that died in hargeisa. I’ve even witnessed landers saying they would rather join Ethiopia than unify.


jimcali23

There are some of them at the clubhouse.