T O P

"Capitalism vs. USSR: millions of homeless vs. all our people are provided with housing" // Soviet Union // 1979 // Artist: Joseph Yefimovsky

"Capitalism vs. USSR: millions of homeless vs. all our people are provided with housing" // Soviet Union // 1979 // Artist: Joseph Yefimovsky

  • By - edikl

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zsrk

I think it's funny that the artist thought it is very important to make the Soviet guy smoke a cigarette with a smug face.


SoftSprocket

It demonstrates that he's rich enough to enjoy a luxury


trorez

Cigarettes werent a luxury


edikl

It was according to American comic books. :)


Henrys_Bro

Red-Bull is a luxury in Russia these days.


SillpGame

Him chugging a Red Bull can wouldn’t look as good


wreckanoyter

Why?


zsrk

They are now in many countries lol


Plantayne

They were in communist Chile. You’d wait in line for hours for the privilege of buying a pack for like 20x the price if anybody even had them. “No hay cigarros” was basically like a meme.


trorez

Early to mid 70s were rough for the world. You had gasoline shortages in europe, north america, etc Also chile was never "communist"


RabidGuillotine

Chilean crisis happened before the 73 oil shock.


plzanswerthequestion

"communist Chile" When was that


Plantayne

1971-1973


edikl

Allende?


rigby_tha_yosh

the socialist?


Plantayne

Yes


plzanswerthequestion

Rather have no cigarettes than Pinochet


PassablyIgnorant

dayum you were there?


Plantayne

My family lived through it.


PassablyIgnorant

my condolences. so, was this during the 60s or the 70s?


Plantayne

Early 70’s. It was a pretty dark time…followed by an ever darker time.


MFyeezy

Chile was never communist


grizzlor_

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvador_Allende >Salvador Guillermo Allende Gossens (26 June 1908 – 11 September 1973) was a Chilean physician and socialist politician, who served as the 28th president of Chile from 3 November 1970 until his suicide on 11 September 1973. **He was the first Marxist to be elected president in a liberal democracy in Latin America.** Of course the US wouldn't allow a democratically elected Marxist president in South America, so the CIA sponsored a coup and installed Pinochet as a military dictator. Allende had some really interesting ideas about how to manage a centrally planned economy ([Project Cybersyn](https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Cybersyn)). edit: also I wonder if the cigarette shortage was related to Nixon/Kissinger's economic policy towards Chile commonly referred to as "the invisible blockade". The US has a long history of weaponizing economic sanctions against socialist states and then being like "see, socialism doesn't work!".


death_of_flats

But Chile itself did not nationalize all industry. It wasn't communist. Same way Trump is a fascist but the US wasn't a fascist nation when he was President.


Es_ist_kalt_hier

In those times smoking was OK for mass-culture all over the world. Massive anti-smoking campaings began in West I think only in the end of 1990s and in Russia only in 2010s


CapitanFracassa

I remember Soviet cartoons with anti-tobacco messages all over.


JuniorJibble

Soviet propaganda seemed pretty on point with its anti-vice statements. I like their alcohol messages. I'm not sure if it was about people's welfare or just because it was in short supply, but they were pretty good nonetheless.


iisno1uno

It was because drunk population was causing all kinds of shit and not productive at their jobs. There was and still is a massive problem the alcoholism in post soviet countries.


edikl

>Massive anti-smoking campaings began in West I think only in the end of 1990s and in Russia only in 2010s There were warnings on Soviet cigarette packs for sure. "What shall we do with Chernobyl? Let’s plant it with tobacco. What for? The warning label on cigarette packs will say “The Ministry of Health gives you one FINAL warning” = Soviet joke


Ildiad_1940

Maybe this is just an elaborate Bulgartabak ad.


JACK_MCUBE_

The coca cola advert being added in the background made it perfect


Svicious22

Perfectly obvious…


andersonb47

Propoganda posters aren't usually interested in subtlety


grisioco

i find ben garrison to be very subtle


2024AM

Coca Cola is a job creator in the US edit: directly employs 86,200 in US


DANGERMAN50000

And a water baron the world over


Incredulouslaughter

And a leading cause of diabetes


Most-Friendly

That creates even more jobs! And then more jobs to clean tons of trash!


thissexypoptart

A large company employs people? You don't say...


death_of_flats

The jobs were created, like God created the earth. That's why we should worship companies.


mundzuk

should everyone bow down and worship them or something?


WeaponH_

It is also exploiting African men.


dethb0y

The layered posters on the left are a very nice touch, as is the small details of the bums like how he's got his shoes off or the blanket on the one's legs. Quite nice work by the artist.


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

In USSR too there were Homeless people. Source:- I was born in USSR and lived 17 years there. You wont see that in larger cities, but in smaller cities(In smaller cities you wont have Kommunalkas, so issue is higher in small cities) you will get houses allotted somewhere outside cities due to corruption and unavailability of houses. So, those are pretty much useless for people who work in Factories in the other side. They lived mostly in Barracks previously designed to hold troops for training which is basically sheds on the side of the road or they lived in Parks during nights visiting families only in weekends who live in the houses allotted for them. Or sometimes in friend's house. It is different from American homelessness, but still they existed


tr4sh_can

Oh I have never considered that. I'm grateful or your insight. Never would have expected it. That is crazy to think that they would sleep in the barracks.


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

They were partial homeless. Weekday homeless, weekend with Family. It was more common in families when they just start settling. In later stages, they will get more ties in the Union/Enterprise they work and will get a Krushchevka in the city that is accessible by trams. In USSR you had no private vehicles and Trams were unavailable in suburbs of smaller cities . So, in USSR, you had 8 hr worktime per day without the recess between and 10 hrs per day if you consider the lunch and other recess allotted for a factory worker. As there are no trams in houses outside cities which you will get allotted, you have to take a tram to the last stop which will be 1 hr usually and then must walk for an hour(you had no cars) or you must hitch a ride. It will be 14hrs per day and is unsustainable as you must do other jobs like waiting in line for food. So, people became partial homeless. It was illegal to be homeless in streets and homeless people were regularly sent to prisons in Western Siberia for being homeless (not Gulags). So, people slept in Parks regularly. When I lived in Kaunas, we had park living people(the term homeless wont be appropriate as they have homes, but it is a bad Idea to live there) who will usually be addicts to vodka and stuff. There were other types of Homeless people too. In USSR there was a neo serfdom where farmers wont be allowed to migrate to cities. So, farms just outside cities had people illegally working in City and being homeless.


PassablyIgnorant

wow! if you don't mind answering some questions.... 1. Where did you live? What was different about that place from other places? 2. I notice that your avatar has brown skin. If that is an accurate representation of you, were you discriminated against? Is this skin the product of ancestry from outside the bloc, or from inside? 3. Are there any interesting stories I should research regarding the USSR? 4. Why did you leave? Considering the age you were when you left, I'm guessing mandatory military service.


fideasu

> Why did you leave? Considering the age you were when you left, I'm guessing mandatory military service. Taking into account that it wasn't quite easy to "just leave", I think it's more probable that s/he just happend to be 17 when USSR stopped existing.


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

Yes, you are correct.


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

1. I lived in Vilnius, Lithuania. It was your normal Republic capital with some Industries. My Father worked in a Military clothes factory and my mom was a Teacher. 2. I just chose brown Avatar because my cousin created this account for me and he is half white, half Latino. I'm white Eastern European. My English Accent is slightly off, but is manageable, so nobody discriminates me. 3. USSR itself was very interesting(or different), everything from waking up to sleeping. 4. I left because my Mom who was a Teacher had contacts in UK who arranged me to study my College in UK. Then, I learnt English and migrated to USA. There was military service aspect too, but I was in Komsomol so military wouldn't be a big issue for me. It happened to be that Lithuania declared Independence in the year (1990) I finished High school. I should have enlisted in Lithuanian military.


PassablyIgnorant

Thank you for the response. You wish you joined the military instead of going to college?


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

I wished yes. I wanted to become an officer in my younger days, but after my neighbor died in Afghanistan I was less interested. But, college was better. Without that I wouldn't have come to USA and become relatively rich.


PassablyIgnorant

You seem to have chosen the better path. Good for you!


JabberGrabber

Some random fun facts: 1) first factory producing toilet paper was launched in 1969 - before that people used newspapers; 2) feminine hygiene products were not available in USSR before late 1980s; 3) starting from 1961 unemployment was a crime - up to 2 years in prison; 4) and read about music on ribs https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribs_(recordings)


Adan714

Not in 1970s. There were almost no bums, it was prohibited. Also, living even in worst barrack is better than being bum. In small towns, people still live in barracks without running water. I personally saw a woman in Tula pouring water into a bucket from a street pump. The quality of housing in the USSR was low. The apartments were cramped. BUT. They were given out completely free of charge (though sometimes this had to wait for years) and the rent was simply negligible. As for communal apartments, it was something monstrous. People cried with happiness when they received separate apartments (let me remind you - for free). The massive construction of a typical housing began under Khrushchev. Stalin did not give a shit about ordinary people, but he built super-expensive elite housing for the elite. Когда Вы уехали из СССР?


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

Agreed. Being a Bum was prohibited, but you still had people in Barracks or in Parks sometimes. But, TBH it is like a fifth of what you find in USA. Very less homeless. And true, but I never lived in a Kommunalka for my entire life tho, it was uncommon in the baltics compared to other parts. I lived in a Khrushchyovka and after the collapse, I sold it to a property investing company and lived in my Dacha. I left Lithuania in 1991.


theBusel

To add. Persons detained for vagrancy were placed in special reception and distribution centers for up to 10 days for a decision to prosecute them, issue a warning, or forcibly employ them. By the way, a poster from 1979. In July 1979, the Secretariat of the CPSU Central Committee approved Protocol #168/6c, by which, before the 1980 Olympics, they began to deport from the streets of Moscow all "unreliable elements" beyond the 101st kilometer: alcoholics, drug addicts, homeless people, convicts and prostitutes.


Johannes_P

Even in some Western countries, there's people who have to rent housing to get nearer from their workplace. One more evidence of why housing and joblessness are related.


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

Yes, true. In USSR too the "official" policy was to have houses within 30 min from workplace. But, you just cant rent out the house that was given to you far from workplace and take another house near the workplace. This type of homelessness was purely caused by bureaucratic inefficiencies instead of real problems like lack of housing. Outside USSR in other Eastern countries, it was less of an issue.


Caleebies

I mean I don't know how true this is of a comparison, but I do find the point fascinating. America hypes itself up all the time, and yet we have so much homelessness. It's easy to see how others may look at America how America looks at others(ie communists)


suzuki_hayabusa

Less than 1% (0.2%) of Americans are homeless. People under authoritarian regimes rarely buy these propaganda. They can only fool western youth decades after their creation. I too have lived under socialist country and I can assure you most of folks in 20th century would have left their country for US if they had the chance. That's why they created iron curtain and Berlin walls to stop their folks from escaping.


Caleebies

You're not wrong. My point being though is that poverty in other countries is often used as a deflection. Let's say you have rich abusive parents. They can constantly deflect that there are poor families who treat their kids so much worse, meanwhile their kid is eating high quality food but getting verbally abused. America is a rich country. It's safer than others. But there are still really big problems. A simple example would be how minimum wage hasn't increased at all after years of inflation. For instance, we have the highest incarceration rates in the world. I believe we have a whopping 5% of all incarcerated in the world.


hdrote

The story behind the Soviet one is kinda tragic. Mainly because it was illegal to be homeless or unemployed as it was considered a parasitic lifestyle. I don’t know about punishments in other Soviet Socialist Republics but they were likely similar if not the same as where I’m from(Latvia): 1 year in prison or a work camp. Source: Criminal Codex of LSSR Article 211 However that’s not to say there wasn’t unemployment or homelessness(as much as the state liked to deny it).


epic_pig

Now this is true propaganda.


Es_ist_kalt_hier

This is true. Of course it can't be said that there were zero homeless persons in USSR but 1) there were no situations person is expelled from dwelling because of no money 2) most of the homeless were "hobos" because of personal reasons, they had their homes but left them to "travel" mostly because of alchohol addiction.


theBusel

Not everyone in the USSR got apartments for free, many in the cities lived in barracks for many years. [https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/maxim\_nm/51556845/3192653/3192653\_original.jpg](https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/maxim_nm/51556845/3192653/3192653_original.jpg) It depended on the city, the place of work. The best conditions were, of course, for party members and other officials.


moniker-meme

Well... at least one thing was right


solid_flake

Well, looking at China vs USA, it’s not totally wrong. From today’s perspective.


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solid_flake

In my mind there wasn’t a huge homelessness and unemployment problem in the late 70s in the US? I thought at that time the US was still kinda in the stage of economically growing? Coming from the 50s & 60s? I don’t know. I’m not American. So feel free to enlighten me.


Delduath

Homelessness and vagrancy has always been a massive problem in the USA, it's just not part of how they present themselves in movies and TV.


G_Viceroy

Show of hands... Who's actually buying this trash?


doriangray42

Life was hard in the USSR, but I was appalled on my first visit to San Fran (tenderloin) to see people living on the sidewalk. I had seen that in India, didn't expect it in the US. So I'll raise one hand: i believe half that propaganda, the other half should show the real conditions in the USSR.


samrequireham

it is my understanding that the USSR had lower rates of both homelessness and coca-cola ads


Howitzer92

I mean yeah, but communal apartments were also a major feature of Soviet life. Having 5 families share a large apartment in Moscow is not the same a properly housing families in individual units as is common in the U.S.


TommiH

Not that common in Moscow. Also which is better? Dying in the street or living with roommates?


SadBoiiConnor420

Yeah America houses lots of families individuals but plenty of people are homeless or living in squalid housing. So that's not really much of a plus for America.


_-null-_

It is when you compare the averages. The average american ends up with much more living space even if the number of homeless people is higher.


staalmannen

But here the thing is not about averages but about the number of people below a certain lower limit of standard. In a way this is definitely a relevant and valid measure: "nobody should live below x standard". With that measure, the propaganda has a point. Then that the USSR was a horrible place/system is something we (probably) all can agree on. You can sort of accept the logic of a propaganda argument without buying in to the whole thing.


[deleted]

Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.


FettPrime

Averages are a poor metric to measure things by. The median would probably be more informative for this scenario.


Howitzer92

I'm not sure how you could argue that Soviet housing wasn't "squalid." Especially if you're comparing it to an American apartment. We're talking about 5 families crammed into something like 1200 square feet at best, sharing utilites without access to many consumer goods common in the West. Even in the 1970s a third of families in the USSR lacked refrigerators. Even now most Russian apartments don't have central heating.


ericsundberg

The United States government forced Black and Brown citizens into government organized slums with intentionally low quality of construction after using eminent domain to seize their equity or after lynch mobs vandalized property while law enforcement stood by (or aided). Housing regulations in the U.S. do not prohibit landlords from dividing apartments into absurdly small quarters. The claim is that the "free" market will dictate what is sub-standard, but only those with capital can actually offer a house. If you try to set up your own house without access to land or if it's not up to building code (which many landlords are not held to) your home will be demolished by the government. Even today, many renters are living under conditions below building standards. Buildings are hard to maintain, however, it speaks volumes that a state which the majority of its population before 1920 had no access to electricity, running water, inconsistent food access, and lived in rural villages would, through the efforts of its government, construct housing for millions of people over the course of 70 years. (It should be noted that the USSR also demolished existing housing, like the US, displacing citizens. Many of those displaced by both countries were ethnic minorities. This video essay provides a good recap of Soviet displacement through urban redevelopment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUS6nI5WB4M) When we talk about oppression a government that gives all of its citizens housing will always be less cruel than a government that intentionally displaces and seizes the assets of targeted subgroups of the Working Class. This site/video provide a good synopsis of the U.S. government's role in segregated America and creating a permanently displaced population: https://www.segregatedbydesign.com/


Howitzer92

Stalin literally murdered 3.3 million Ukrainians in a starvation genocide and had 900k people shot and more sent to Gulags. You have no leg to stand on.


ericsundberg

Yep cause the U.S. didn't every put anyone in internment camps or commit genocide... oh wait, yes throughout most of the U.S.'s history the government has actively funded programs to detain or remove ethnic minorities throughout the continental United States and the regions it occupied. Also, several states in the U.S. had eugenics programs that resulted in the forced sterilization of working-class women, particularly indigenous and African American persons. Virginia's model eugenics act was the inspiration for Hitler's eugenics program. The U.S. has a long history of displacement and appropriation of property but it seems you would rather ignore that to fit a bizarre narrative. I'm no fan of Stalin. Authoritarians have no place in a democratic government; naturally they will seek to snuff out democracy. But in America today, we have more people imprisoned per Capita than any other country, most for "crimes" that have to make us consider whether they are truly political prisoners or captured for enslavement: "The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people," former Nixon domestic policy chief John Ehrlichman explained in an interview with Harper. Beyond political targeting, the U.S., per the Constitution, allows slavery as a form of punishment: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction." Regardless of changes in leadership in the last 150 years, we have not seen a leader amongst the two major U.S. parties to end the use of forced labor in U.S. prisons, nor sought to end the targeting of racial minorities by law enforcement. Millions of Americans have been detained, killed, and exploited by their own government. Stalin is bad, sure, but that does not give any other country as pass. The people of any nation should not stand for exploitation and depravity from their government, regardless of the governmental or economic system. **edit changed "activetly" to "actively" and "through" to "throughout"** *NOTE: I don't want this to come across as an attack. Oppression of the people and the Working Class can happen under any system where the people have the means of production, their homes, or their lives stolen from them. No state should be in the business of displacing its populace; fundamentally that behavior by a government shows the truth -- it is not a government of the people, it's a government to control the people. People are entitled to life, liberty, and happiness by their humanity alone and nothing else -- if a government deprives its people of those qualities it has failed. Moreover, if a government protects those who seek to hoard and deprive others of life, liberty, and happiness, it only serves the elite.* *I firmly believe past the historical baggage, working-class people want the same conditions, a good life, safe living conditions, right to privacy, and food security. Talking about individual leaders is irrelevant when the conditions are material. To fundamentally change the system we must reject our oppressor no matter who they are and what they say. And to critique oppressors we must call out injustice no matter where we see it -- the US propaganda against standards of living in the USSR is a distraction to keep Americans complicit in the inequality of their own system. Soviet propaganda is also subject to this same scrutiny. However, that does not make any injustice less real or less valid. We must call out oppression in the U.S. or we will never fix the problem.*


qpqpdbdbqpqp

u.s. killed ~150k people in 3 days


edikl

>Even in the 1970s a third of families in the USSR lacked refrigerators. Even now most Russian apartments don't have central heating. You should stop getting your facts from comic books. Every family I knew had a refrigerator.


pohui

Since you're looking for anecdotal evidence, my family did not have a fridge. I was born in a communal apartment, where I lived with my parents in one tiny room that was our bedroom, living room and kitchen. The bathroom was shared at the end of the corridor. My parents were not particularly poor among their peers, although I couldn't say whether their friends had fridges or not.


edikl

>Having 5 families share a large apartment in Moscow is not the same a properly housing families in individual units as is common in the U.S. That was more common before mass housing construction (late 1950s). Most Soviet people didn't live in communal housing.


Howitzer92

In less familar with the post-Stalin era. As I understand it. Things got better in a lot of ways when he died, but the USSR severely lagged in living standards until the end.


[deleted]

Yeah, that Nazi invasion really did a number on the Soviet living conditions


rigby_tha_yosh

better than being homeless lol


Blindsnipers36

Tbf I thought the ussr loved Coke or it might have been Pepsi


monoatomic

If you mean the condos being built in my neighborhood with 100%, 15-year tax abatements, then I certainly can't afford to buy one


dotlurk2

As terrible as life in the USSR was, that part is actually true. You wouldn't have spotted any beggars, homeless or unemployed people. Neither any vandals, rioters, etc. Simply because the "appropriate" services would have taken care of it. Sometimes very ruthlessly. Having a job wasn't a problem, the problem was that you couldn't buy anything with the given money, because the shelves were empty. In general you didn't buy flats, simply because you couldn't. You got them by assignment and this took either time or connections with the right people. In the meantime people lived with their families, roommates, for very very long times. You can be pretty sure though that most Russians would prefer a free life like in the US, even if it came with certain risks, rather than a socially "safe" life meticulously guided by a tyrannical government.


G_Viceroy

Beautifully spoken... It's a total shit life in communist countries. State issued life is a free range prison system. Here it's a choice to live like that. Opportunities aren't always available but you can go as far as you choose to. I really don't think people understand that here. People don't want to live their whole life 3 families to a single floor or room, have barely anything available to survive on and the frills in life a rarity. We live very well in capitalist countries and a lot of those luxuries disappear quickly when the government is in control.


dotlurk2

What I find baffling is the blatant ignorance of so many "progressives" or leftists in the West. They don't seem to realize what achievement "free speech" actually is, the freedom to have *and be able to voice* your views and opinions without persecution. Instead they happily cancel/ban people and are convinced that they're the good guys! They're protesting police brutality and have no idea what that even means. In a communist state such a riot wouldn't last a few minutes, the rioters would be arrested and beaten to a pulp. Or worse, because "unfortunate accidents" happen. Wait, but wouldn't the press report this? Of course, it would dutifully condemn the rioters as enemies of the state, in the best case they'd call them naive youths who were misled by foreign capitalist agencies. It's such a shame what is happening right now and so many people are celebrating it!


kool_guy_69

Buying it? I can see it from my window.


rigby_tha_yosh

probably the hundreds of thousands of homeless americans or the hundreds of thoousands of soviet citizens living in goverment-funded housing


WelfareIsntSocialism

Buying what? A coke? I think the soviets preferred Pepsi. Even had their own clear Pepsi they traded like, 10 military ships to Pepsi for.


Howitzer92

Mashal Zhukov preferred coke. https://www.businessinsider.com/us-secret-clear-coca-cola-for-soviet-gen-georgy-zhukov-2021-7


G_Viceroy

Coke doesn't go flat before you finish drinking it. Even if you sit it out over night. Clearly the higher quality product.


BillyBabel

Fact is the poorest in Russia were better off than the poorest in America. The middle class was probably worse off though, but Russia was a country with like 1/8th the wealth of the United States


GenVec

About 2/3rds of Reddit take Soviet propaganda at face value.


G_Viceroy

In my eyes you spelt fact wrong. But I haven't been on here long.


superfrankie189

mate this whole site literally loves communism


pheasant-plucker

They made great propaganda.


LateralEntry

All the communist fanboys in this subreddit


qaoock

Those Soviet style apartment blocks in Russia are pure depression if you have ever witnessed them currently.


KeepThemmunsOut

Never been to Russia but I've been in "Soviet" era apartments in Poland and the former GDR and found them okay (better in some respects than some of the more recently built crap back home) although three decades on there may be some survivor bias here (as in the really crap ones having largely been torn down)


gramada1902

Soviet era houses in former GDR and Poland on average are better maintained than those in Russia, especially if you compare small towns.


KeepThemmunsOut

There's a [guy on youtube](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-oxiUldANbJd6FOYqh93FA) who has done a few video's on the subject of housing in Minsk, Belarus. Seemingly there was some Soviet decree that elevators were henceforth mandatory in all buildings taller than six stories. The result: Minsk is full of five storey buildings !


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KeepThemmunsOut

The ones which do were probably retrofitted ? The place I stayed in in Berlin had no elevator and was *six* stories. Felt a bit sorry for the poor sods on the top floor although I suppose it was one way of keeping physically fit !


royalsocialist

Have lived in plenty of commie blocks, they've been either just fine but cheap feeling or they've been great. Not sure what you're talking about.


waffleman258

A ssomeone who has lived in and around blocks like these thry make me feel warm and nostalgic. I often miss them when I am abroad, especially if I have to endure the sight of massive blue glass boxes. Also knowing how these blocks provide affordable housing for virtually everyone I can give the aesthetics a pass. It's a matter of perspective, really.


qaoock

> It's a matter of perspective, really. Definitely, it's better than living on the streets during a cold winter. And to be fair, the architects couldn't have predicted a Soviet-apocalypse aesthetic because they probably assumed that the blocks would be well maintained. As others have mentioned, it depends. Some are in disrepair and others are much better maintained.


shadowmask

Depression is a massive step up from deprivation and death on the street. Ever heard of the hierarchy of needs? Not dying comes before everything else and America has its priorities ass-backwards.


Atara01

Can't say I agree, at least not in general. They're not exactly amazing, but a lot of them have a lot of green space around them. Where I'm from in the baltics they're also often covered in foliage or painted in pastel colors. Depressing ones exist for sure, but they're not all that exist.


Es_ist_kalt_hier

This is true


can-o-ham

I like the Yugoslav blocks. They need some updates but compared to more generic apartment buildings the brutalist style is kind of cool.


edikl

Nonsense. What's depressing are HORDES of homeless crazies in major American cities.


qaoock

You do know that it is possible for two terrible things to exist simultaneously? If you have ever lived in those apartment blocks you would know how shitty they are, they are depression factories. Homelessness is also awful, yes, worse than extremely shitty housing.


StickmanPirate

> If you have ever lived in those apartment blocks you would know how shitty they are, they are depression factories. Because they were cheap to build after the war. Obviously they're not great but they're better than massive homelessness.


WelfareIsntSocialism

Exactly


RatherGoodDog

You have never been in one, a lot of us have. What you say is nonsense. Edit: The comment I replied to just said "Nonsense"


qaoock

OP is the same guy who boldly proclaimed that said sleeping outside in winter in a city that regularly hits -20 to -30 with windchill and where several homeless people die every year because of the cold, isn't actually that bad. This is actually after they doubted that homeless people sleep outside in Russian winters. He is either extremely naive or extremely idealistic.


syntheticwisdom

You really gotta love the "free thinkers" that are stumbling over each other to get in this thread and tell us how homelessness in the US is not an issue at all and we're actually the best.


Fsearch5

Remember one system doesn't force you to work the other does.


Misanthrope42069

Don't both force you to work? One with the threat of imprisonment and the other with the threat of starvation and death.


ThrumboOfLegend

I've heard that the Soviets had posters telling their people to not to eat their children, can someone link me to one.


edikl

Here you go, comrade. https://images.app.goo.gl/fmeAu1fvoUiULQ498


10z20Luka

Lmao this is almost certainly staged, equally as absurd as the guy you're replying to.


scothc

It's a real, famous picture from the great depression. Edit: is actually from 1948


Johannes_P

It was after 1945.


scothc

Holy shit you're right. I never knew that. 1948 apparently


[deleted]

[удалено]


10z20Luka

I haven't said anything about the USSR. People in the USSR did not need to be told to not eat their children. People in the US did not regularly sell their children into slavery.


FoolhardyBastard

Savage!


Johannes_P

It was only in the 1932 Ukraine.


SomeoneWithOpinions

USSR killed homeless people or sent them to work camps and gulags.


WeaponH_

No, they made them work and lice in an house. Often not a good house but at least they did something.


SomeoneWithOpinions

At least we both understand the propaganda poster OP shared is major BS.


RufinTheFury

Tanky alert


ArttuH5N1

Welcome to /r/PropagandaPosters lol, this place can be pretty wild at times.


RufinTheFury

Oh I'm well aware. It's always fun to see OP go full "I unironically believe propaganda" in the sub lol


qaoock

Yeah, I recently joined this subreddit because I found it interesting. I made one comment on the depressive vibe of Soviet architecture having experienced it first hand (in modern times, it looks like an apocalyptic wasteland, those apartment blocks) without making a comment on Communism or homelessness (I admitted that I rather live in a house than be homeless too) and I had 10+ replies saying that the housing wasn't that bad or people making excuses for it. It felt pretty strange, almost like this sub leans a certain way politically which I am just finding out now. OP does make his bias very evident by lashing out at every comment even minorly critiquing the absurdity of this poster, but I didn't know most of the sub swayed that way, but my comment was just about the architecture and people still seem to think I'm making a comment about Communism, lol.


Irrational-actor

Truth in advertising


vodkaandponies

Not really. Homelessness in the USSR was like corruption and other social problems. It officially didn't exist on paper, but it was very much present.


juventinosochi

You was unable to live on the streets in the ussr, they literally had a law for "тунеядство" (unwillingness to work, parasitism) - "Systematic vagrancy or begging, continued after a repeated warning issued by the administrative authorities, - shall be punishable by imprisonment for a term of up to two years, or correctional labor for a term of six months to one year."


vodkaandponies

Can’t have homelessness if you make homelessness a crime. *taps head*


Servodellagleba

"Ehi under a certain light a prison cell could be considered a house"


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

Yes, that is why people lived in Parks between apartment blocks or in some old sheds/barracks.


G_Viceroy

A decent portion of starvation didn't exist on paper either. Like most of their problems.


KeepThemmunsOut

There wasn't really much starvation in postwar USSR. Sure there were massive problems with shortages of particular foods, long queues at grocery stores, dubious quality of some items and even rationing but actual starvation was rare to non-existent ?


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

It existed, in some rural areas post 1955 (Till 1955 due to transport infrastructure not built properly starvation was there and deaths too). In Cities you had very less starvation as you said, but mainly in Belarus, and Central Asia rural areas had starvation. In Azerbaijan too there were some isolated incidents of starvation due to corruption. In 1970s starvation was non existent. But till late 60s it was there. It resurfaced again in the late stages of afghan war. and stopped and came again in 1990s-95 in some republics.


KeepThemmunsOut

Thanks. Good honest detailed answer rather than the usual sweeping generalisations and *Soviet Communism was always wonderful/terrible* agenda pushing we usually get in these discussions.


Ok_Razzmatazz_3922

And look at this comment about Homelessness. [Here](https://www.reddit.com/r/PropagandaPosters/comments/q0fc62/comment/hf8dz6h/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3)


edikl

Where was it present?


vodkaandponies

In the USSR? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homelessness_in_Russia


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RomeNeverFell

>https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homelessness\_in\_Russia Your link literally has no source when talking about the USSR after the 40s. Claiming the USSR, of all places, had a significant homeless population is ridiculous.


vodkaandponies

https://www.csmonitor.com/1988/0519/ehome.html Stop sucking off the ghost of the USSR.


Over100Accounts

I'd rather be homeless in California than live in the projects in Russia.


edikl

You're welcome, comrade! https://youtu.be/IbjMs8V3YBo


Land_Squid_1234

I'm sure you say this as someone who has experienced at least one of these scenarios, right? Surely you're not just talking out of your ass? This is a Soviet poster, not a Russian one


edikl

So what's quality American housing? That collapsed condo in Miami or some 2 million dollar house in Bay Area that looks like a cowshed?


Pikabuu2

\>America is only cities


Colalbsmi

Every American dreams of someday moving to Russia to live in a concrete bunker with 3 other families.


lavawalker465

You must be mental is you think any time or the Soviet reign was better than anytime of the U.S. You remember when the Soviet’s had yo build a wall to prevent their people from going to capitalism? Or how the average MODERN Russian income yearly is only 6,000 dollars?


turan1995

Soviet is great of the world..


azneorp

Yea but have you seen the Russian houses? Most streets in America are in better shape.


WelfareIsntSocialism

"Provided with" as long as you don't mind who you live with and join the party, becoming a talking piece for the party. They promised my mom a car and a house if she joined the party. I hear theres still people waiting for their free car. Good poster though, I like the advertising and the color choice.


edikl

"becoming a talking piece for the party" = wtf are u talking about?


WelfareIsntSocialism

You weren't allowed to say anything negative about the party, if you did, you lose everything they "gave" you. Ie the house and the car, if you ever got those anyway


edikl

Yeah, try saying anything negative about your boss under capitalism and let us know the outcome. :)


vodkaandponies

If I don't like my boss under capitalism I can seek work elsewhere. under communism, I'm stuck working in whatever shitty factory the state says I have to work in.


edikl

no work = foreclosure/unpaid rent = homeless


vodkaandponies

Not for the last year. CDC moratorium.


edikl

CDC is pure communism, as landlords are unable to keep up with their Lexus payments.


WelfareIsntSocialism

You dont know what capitalism nor communism are.


vodkaandponies

Ok?


WelfareIsntSocialism

Boss =/= political party you dope.


Tayte_

Why are you such a communist bro go live in Venezuela, try it out


edikl

and where do you live? your mom's basement?


Paavo-Vayrynen

At least his mom can afford a basement


edikl

Given she keeps her second job delivering packages for Amazon.


Paavo-Vayrynen

Or you know, actually living in an affordable region of the country and having a job with good pay instead of flipping burgers and expecting a luxury life.


edikl

Sure, but anything affordable is located in the middle of nowhere.


Paavo-Vayrynen

And what are the downsides?


saynotopulp

3 families packed into a 2 bedroom with a requirement to be a factory slave. But sure


edikl

You're welcome, comrade. https://youtu.be/IbjMs8V3YBo


DisplayZestyclose415

I've know two people who lived through communism and hated it. They were rather young when the wall fell. They hated the suppression of culture, and being dirt poor, and they were both East Germany. Interestingly enough, every Russian I've met, considerably older, longed for the days of communism and their reasons were that they always had food, jobs, lived simple lives....


lastherokiller

Sure those houses may be made out of cardboard but......


Tomycj

They have something in common: both are the rare case in their respective countries.


OG_Squeekz

As someone who lived in CA and currently lives in the eastern bloc, this is weirdly accurate. Except the buildings should be oppressive and in complete disrepair, the man should be depressed dreaming of a greater income, wearing Adidas or Puma and there should be more homeless with more belongings, like a tent, a cart and dog.


nohead123

yes comrade free housing in gulag for you


bigbjarne

The USA has currently more people in prison per capita than the USSR had during the prison systems peak.