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September 2021 Covid-19 Pandemic megathread

September 2021 Covid-19 Pandemic megathread

Benthekarateboy

Are we in inflation right now? I hear so many issues of money increasing at Dollar Tree and so on.


Cliffy73

Inflation right now is higher than it has been in many years in the U.S. It’s still not spectacularly high and there’s no reason to think it’s going to last at current levels, although it’s not going to be artificially depressed like it has been, either.


Benthekarateboy

So, will it take a while for it to be reduced?


Cliffy73

Who can say?


Benthekarateboy

Good point


AllisonDamMillr

This is an awkward question, but has anyone had a weird reaction to the vaccine, like greenish stool? Or should I see a doctor?


shockingdevelopment

What does the covid vaccine do? Does it mean you can't catch it? That you can but can't experience its effects? Or that you can catch it but cannot spread it to others?


Cliffy73

It significantly reduces your chances of becoming infected. It might reduce your chance of spreading if infected (we’re not sure), but since you’re much less likely to have it, you’re much less likely to spread it. And if you do catch it, the vaccine is nearly perfect in preventing death and very good at preventing serious disease.


shockingdevelopment

My taxi driver said it was developed suspiciously fast.


Cliffy73

You’re joking, right?


shockingdevelopment

He wasn't. I said it was the result of unprecedented international coordination.


Scry_me_a_river

Had the 2nd shot but have even less symptoms than the first time. The lightest sore arm pain. Does that mean it's not working? Everyone I know that has done it has had symptoms (all of them fever) regardless age, health issues etc. What gives? Is it NOT working?


Cliffy73

It’s just a crapshoot. Plenty of people have side effects. Plenty of people don’t. It does not seem correlated with how effective the vaccine is. Don’t worry about it.


Icy-Vermicelli-3773

Are all covid testings safe? If you came to a covid testing centre that seemed dodgy, could a covid tester have anything bad that could be put into your mouth when testing? or would that be seen in the lab or anything


Blackong252

why do people that get affected and gets well need the vaccine ? btw just to be clear , i do support vaccines adn got my shots If i understand vaccines right , they are given for the immune to be prepared for strong versions of the viruses in the vaccine but the people who got covid and recovered , will have a strong immune that has learned from the direct covid virus so .... why are the people that recovered need vaccines ?


Cliffy73

Natural immunity can wane. Regardless of your current antibody status, the vaccine can only improve it.


kcasper

For the first 6 months you don't really need a vaccine after recovery. After 6 months there is a high risk of reinfection. Vaccines should last longer, and they can be given again if it is determine that they fail after a time. People with covid-19 lasting side effects have found that the vaccine can sometime ease up the symptoms due to the immune system reacting to the spike proteins the vaccine introduces. Vaccines cause the immune system to react faster to a virus. An infection is a race in time between the infection spreading through the body, and the immune system reacting to it. The immune system will react a lot quicker if a person has recently had a vaccine.


Blackong252

Thanks for the explanation !


OutcastedFrom17SG

In the future, could a coronavirus vaccine (almost) completely prevent fully vaccinated individuals from being infected with it? If one for other diseases exists, I don't see why this can't be the case for the coronavirus.


Cliffy73

When the vaccines first came out, that was nearly the situation. Vaccines were somewhere around 95% effective in preventing infection, and even better than that at preventing hospitalization and death. Unfortunately there was a more virulent variant that evolved earlier this year, which the vaccines are less effective against (although still very good, and they remain exceedingly effective at preventing serious illness).


Doctorcockso

Why doesn't the covid vaccine use dead viruses like the flu vaccine does


Cliffy73

Vaccine science has advanced since Jenner.


OutcastedFrom17SG

The [Sinovac](https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/the-sinovac-covid-19-vaccine-what-you-need-to-know) and [Sinopharm](https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/the-sinopharm-covid-19-vaccine-what-you-need-to-know) vaccines are; it's just that most of the popular COVID vaccines are mRNA-based ones.


gut_instinct90

Why aren't those available in Canada


OutcastedFrom17SG

Recognition, geopolitics and effectiveness. If a vaccine administered in country XYZ isn't going to be acknowledged by it, why bother giving it out? Besides, Canada (or most of the Western world) are wealthy enough or be wary of China (due to concerns of Chinese spying via Huawei/ hiding the poor efficacy of their home made vaccines/ prefer Western ones) to get the mRNA vaccines. Pfizer's and Moderna's vaccine effectiveness are in the ballpark of at least 90%, compared to Sinovac's 50% and Sinopharm's 79%. This is why wealthier nations always try to get the first two, because they can and want extra protection from the vaccines. https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/the-sinovac-covid-19-vaccine-what-you-need-to-know https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/the-sinopharm-covid-19-vaccine-what-you-need-to-know https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/who-can-take-the-pfizer-biontech-covid-19--vaccine#:~:text=How%20efficacious%20is%20the%20vaccine,SARS%2DCoV%2D2%20infection. https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/the-moderna-covid-19-mrna-1273-vaccine-what-you-need-to-know


Xxcheesyboi123xX

Why the hell would someone at my school have a pass to not wear a mask? My school has a mask mandate. Kinda happy about it tbh. I don’t know this person personally and will NOT ask them. But they literally have a little document that they show to anyone who tries to enforce the mask mandate upon them. This person never wears a mask. People who tell him to put his mask on always apologize after seeing his little piece of paper. No one else at the school has this. How does this make any sense?


Hatherence

Some possibilities: 1. They have some sort of legitimate condition or disability that makes it difficult for them to wear a mask. Something like anxiety or PTSD, or something like severe emphysema (though my guess is the former because the latter would likely be more visible) 2. They got a forged medical record to say they have something like that, but they do not. There is literally no way to narrow it down any further without asking.


GoofySeriously

Another question that I have. Are their any studies that I can look at/refer others to that demonstrate that vaccinated people contract the virus less frequently. I ask because, on the surface, vaccinated people are usually asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. This would result in not getting tested as frequently as an unvaccinated person. I've been trying to keep up with all the research but the problem had been too many people saying too many things. Many of the studies that are put out haven't been peer reviewed, due to needing to get the information out as soon as possible vs. the delay in the peer review process. So, I'm looking for research that I can disseminate and get as informed as possible when speaking to others.


Hatherence

>Are their any studies that I can look at/refer others to that demonstrate that vaccinated people contract the virus less frequently. Yes, in fact, there are a lot. Here's a selection from google, but if you want more I could find extra. [SARS-CoV-2 Infections and Hospitalizations Among Persons Aged ≥16 Years, by Vaccination Status - Los Angeles County, California, May 1-July 25, 2021](https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34437525/) [SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Effectiveness in a High-Risk National Population in a Real-World Setting](https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M21-1577) This one is probably the best to answer your question. [Interim Estimates of Vaccine Effectiveness of BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273 COVID-19 Vaccines in Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Infection Among Health Care Personnel, First Responders, and Other Essential and Frontline Workers — Eight U.S. Locations, December 2020–March 2021](https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7013e3.htm?s_cid=mm7013e3_w) [A CDC page summarizing a lot of research.](https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/science/science-briefs/fully-vaccinated-people.html)


GoofySeriously

Thanks. This is a good start.


Riverrat423

People who are planning to leave your job to avoid the Covid vaccine mandate, where do you plan to find a new job?


Cliffy73

You might consider reposting this in the October thread now that this one has been unstickied.


Riverrat423

OK, it may be more interesting when more mandates happen as well.


throwaway_769875

Recently my employer began requiring that employees either submit proof of COVID-19 vaccination or submit to weekly testing. I have been fully vaccinated since April and completely support this requirement. I immediately sent back a scan of my vaccination card and a signed copy of the form they provided. That was last Friday. This evening I got an email from HR that started with "our records indicate that you are not fully vaccinated...." and told me I'd have to start getting tested weekly. I wouldn't be this mad if that were all they screwed up. The email was sent by HR to a huge list of people. Something like half of my department, including other people who I am fairly certain are vaccinated. I responded by forwarding (in a separate email to just the HR person) the email I sent last Friday with my proof documents attached. I was very polite and didn't say much at all. I also BCC'd my boss. My main question is am I wrong to be incredibly pissed off about this? I don't want any of the people on this list to think I'm an antivaxer. Who knows how many of them are in the same boat as I am. Also, is this a HIPPA violation on HR's part? I'm failing so far to find the answer to that online. I'm not thinking about leaving or suing them or anything. I have a great job. We just have an incredibly incompetent HR department.


Cliffy73

I woulda done a reply all. I understand your annoyance, but given the huge recipient list, it sounds like you’re not the only one to whom it was mistakenly sent, so most of them will likely understand it was not a reliable list. Anyway, outside the professional sports context, my experience is that anti-vaxxers are only too happy to talk about it. People will believe you when you say it was a screw up.


throwaway_769875

Thanks. Yeah I really really wanted to reply all. I didn't only because I've heard rumors about some of the people in that department having a vindictive streak and was worried that the appearance of semi public shaming might set them off. I actually just a got a response from one of the HR people saying thanks for your followup and that list wasn't supposed to be public! I wasn't expecting an apology or anything, but at least now I probably won't be up all night replaying the situation in my head.


SurprisedPotato

I can only answer a small part of your question: HIPAA only applies to medical professionals and their supporting staff. It says nothing about whether HR is allowed to tell people your vaccination status. There may be *other* laws or policies that apply, but (a) that depends very much on your location, and (b) I'd have no idea what they were anyway. You'd need advice from a lawyer about that. I hope this all gets resolved to your satisfaction.


throwaway_769875

Thanks for your reply. I think I mostly just need to sleep on this and probably talk to a few of my coworkers and reassure them that I am vaccinated.


SurprisedPotato

That sounds like a sensible plan


GoofySeriously

Preface: done on mobile. Excuse any erroneous spelling/grammatical errors I'll start off by saying I'm not anti-vax. I am just a little confused on the rhetoric that surrounds vaccination for COVID. So, I keep hearing people say that people should get vaccinated for other people's benefit. Which sounds good but vaccinated people are still being infected. I understand vaccination helping prevent severe symptoms from COVID and preventing death. This only helps the one vaccinated. So if vaccinated people are still contracting AND, likely spreading the virus, how does it help anyone but the vaccinated? Is it helping because you are keeping fewer people from needing medical care? It also seems that many vaccinated people are less cautious about wearing masks and where they go, thereby, contributing to the spread. Not that unvaccinated people are any better. TLDR: How does someone getting vaccinated help others if they can still contract and spread the virus?


Cliffy73

The vaccinated contract the disease much, much less often. They (we, rather) therefore have the opportunity to pass it on to others much, much less often. So the vaccine both protects the person who gets it and everyone that person interacts with. COVID has, for months, been almost exclusively a pandemic among the unvaccinated.


GoofySeriously

Is there any study that you could point me to so I can point others to it? Many of the people I come into contact with don't trust word-of-mouth without something backing it.


kcasper

There are quite a few studies on the subject. Here is a recent one. https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/vaccinated-people-are-less-likely-spread-covid-new-research-finds-n1280583


GoofySeriously

Thanks for the link


Cliffy73

No, too lazy. But they won’t be difficult to Google.


rewardiflost

Vaccination reduces the risk of infection, and reduces the risk of spread. If we say that vaccination reduces infection and spread by 60%, then that means that there will be 60% fewer new cases caused by each vaccinated person. (made up number for example- actual numbers are probably larger). If people don't get infected, then they aren't breeding hosts for new variants. Fewer new variants means we're all safer. So, vaccinations mean fewer variants, and vaccinations mean we are all safer. And, yes - fewer vaccinated people wind up in hospitals. People with things like heart attacks are dying in the US because they can't get to a nearby hospital. If fewer vaccinated people are taking up limited hospital space, then that means the rest of us, if we have heart attacks, gunshot wounds, cancer, pregnancy complications - are all safer.


SurprisedPotato

>So if vaccinated people are still contracting AND, likely spreading the virus, how does it help anyone but the vaccinated? They are, but they are doing it *much much less* than if they were still unvaccinated. So, while getting vaccinated doesn't *guarantee* you'll never catch and pass on covid, it does make it *much less likely* you'll do so. >Is it helping because you are keeping fewer people from needing medical care? This is also important. If the hospital's ICU is swamped, they can't properly care for others with different life-threatening conditions. >It also seems that many vaccinated people are less cautious about wearing masks and where they go, thereby, contributing to the spread. While this is true, the gain from the fact that they're vaccinated more than makes up for the loss from the fact that they're less careful with masks. Especially since, as you noted, > Not that unvaccinated people are any better.


Thefast3869

Has anyone else not gotten their smell back after a long time? I got Covid early December of 2020 and immediately lost taste and smell. Luckily my taste came back after 4 days but I never really got my smell back. After about 6 months i could barely smell anything at all and EVERYTHING has the exact same scent. My poop literally has the same scent in my mind as literally anything else, whether it be food, flowers, candles, etc. EVERYTHING SMELLS THE SAME and its so faint I’m starting to get frustrated after almost a year.


GameboyPATH

You're not alone. [While most people who experience loss of smell ultimately regain that sense, it takes several months, according to a June study](https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20210624/lost-sense-of-smell-returns-for-almost-all-after-covid#1). >By the four-month mark, objective testing of 51 of the patients showed that about 84% (43) had already regained a sense of smell, while six of the remaining eight patients had done so by the eight-month mark. Only two out of the 51 patients who'd been analyzed using the specialized tests had some impaired sense of smell one year after their initial diagnosis, the findings showed. >Overall, 96% of the patients objectively recovered by 12 months, Renaud's team reported. Meanwhile, it's understandably a stressful experience, and I hope you're getting the support you need, whether it's social support or the guidance of your doctor.


Thefast3869

I got a strong mental and i have gotten used to it, but the only thing thats annoying is when my friends say our food smells delicious lol


gluuey

Are teachers advised to get a booster shot, regardless of age?


Cliffy73

CDC guidance is that the elderly and those 50 and older with underlying health issues *should* get a booster. Younger teachers and others in high-risk settings or who work with vulnerable populations (such as unvaccinated children) *may* get the booster. So far, this is only for people who got the Pfizer vaccine, although boosters for the other shots are currently being reviewed. https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/09/cdc-director-boosters/620222/ is an article which includes discussion with CDC Director Walensky.


gluuey

Thanks, I think it’s a good idea to get it regardless of age, provided 6 months have elapsed. I got so many students that will take their masks off to cough and test positive the next day.


Jtwil2191

Where are you? In the US, recommendations vary based on the state.


Lutakein

Earlier in this Pandemic, someone I used to know (who I no longer talk to) said that every single person is going to get Covid no matter what. Is he right and that we should do nothing about the virus?


SurprisedPotato

It is true that everyone is going to eventually be exposed to covid. For every 100 people who are still unvaccinated, between 1 to 3 will die, with many more becoming seriously ill. Therefore we should do everything possible to get people vaccinated as soon as possible, and to slow the spread of covid to give people time to get their shots. Your friend is right that everyone will be exposed to covid eventually, but mistaken about what that means.


Lutakein

The friend in question is someone who worships the ground that Trump walks on and tells anyone who criticizes him to "shut the fuck up".


SurprisedPotato

He sounds like a difficult friend. Was he always like this? Keep calm and continue talking to him. Look up /r/StreetEpistemology


Lutakein

I no longer talk to him. He was a bit of a troubled person in school.


SurprisedPotato

Fair enough


TheApiary

1. No, probably not everyone will get covid since most other viruses that exist, only some people get them 2. Even if it were true that everyone was eventually going to get covid, it's still worth trying to delay how long that takes. For example, in April 2020, lots of people got covid and we had no idea at all how to deal with it and it was very bad. Hospitals were full and couldn't handle all the sick people. Now, you can get vaccinated, so even if you do get covid, it's much less dangerous. Because of things like that, it's still better to make the pandemic move slower.


aesthetic_laker_fan

Why do antivaxers get angry when you mock them as they die from a preventable situation?


TheApiary

I think pretty much anyone would be angry if you mock them while they're dying, that's a pretty shitty thing to do


aesthetic_laker_fan

Not really they put the lives of the immunocompromised at risk and are almost always bigots


frizzykid

You mocking them only further cements their beliefs. People like you are also part of the problem of this pandemic because if there were less "in your face morons! way to be stupid!" type people in this world a lot of these people would be more willing to listen to reason and change their beliefs. One of the most toxic things we do as a society is mock and make fun of people when they are wrong. 99% of the willfully ignorant people that exist in the world are willfully ignorant because they don't like the feeling of embarrassment of being wrong. A little humility goes a long way on BOTH ends.


aesthetic_laker_fan

Oh man I don't want them to vaccinate. The venn diagram of anti vaxers and people i disliked before the pandemic make two perfectly concentric circles. The less ignorant and anti-intellectual people we have around the more we will move forward as a society.


GameboyPATH

COVID only has a 1% mortality rate. If you're banking on antivaxxers just dying out, you're waiting for an outcome that's never going to happen. The rate that antivaxxers spread misinformation to people who are scared, confused, and/or hearing conflicting info about COVID and vaccines **far** exceeds the rate of them dying from COVID. Therefore, combatting misinformation and encouraging vaccinations to the broader population is still the correct course of action.


frizzykid

Tldr you like having people to make fun of because it makes you feel better about yourself. You're still part of the problem


TheApiary

I don't really see how mocking people while they die helps those problems though


aesthetic_laker_fan

They deserve to be mocked it doesn't help they just deserve to suffer indignity before they pass away for being so selfish and ignorant


kcasper

If they believe their bullshit, their natural reaction to being told that they are wrong or lying will always be anger. That is a natural reaction. It is also a natural reaction for you to assume, incorrectly, that they are feeling guilt if they display anger.


_Hyzenthlay_

Edit: ive received a proper response thank you for reading and taking time to comment but it is now solved for the most part So I already got covid and it virtually did nothing to me. I had a bit of body aches and fatigue and that was pretty much it. Never got it since. I’m not fond of this vaccine (it’s worth mentioning I suffer from psychosis so any and all bad experiences people have had with it are going to be at the front lines of my decision making and it’s not my choice this is a brain disease I suffer from) But mainly because I’ve already gotten covid and don’t see a point in getting the vaccine now. :T So considering covid did virtually nothing to me and I’ve been perfectly fine since. (Is it since or sense? I’m dumb) is there literally any point in me getting the vaccine? Like covid didn’t do anything to me really and I haven’t gotten again and its been like a year. Pls don’t bombard me with comments about “be considerate of others!” Or “UR CHOOSING DEATH1!1!1” I will literally just block it :/ I’m looking for genuine empathetic realistic responses.


kcasper

Yes there is a point to getting the vaccine. Better protection, less chance of future infections. If nothing else it will allow you to get in venues that you can't otherwise. Before doing so consider becoming a plasma donor. In the first 6 months after getting Covid-19 most are really good donors for covid-19 antibodies. Convalescent plasma is a life saving treatment. And in the first 6 months there is little chance of you getting another infection. However I have no idea who to tell you to call. Maybe someone else here will know.


_Hyzenthlay_

That’s true and I appreciate the answer! I’m going to edit my question soon as someone answered it really well earlier. I’d love to be a donor but I don’t have a whole lot of blood as it is :( like I’m literally lacking in red blood cells to the point that I may have anemia. Can I donate plasma still with that?


SurprisedPotato

You'd best ask your doctor or blood donation centre about that.


_Hyzenthlay_

Ah yeah you got a point ty


Cliffy73

I do not understand why you think “be considerate of others” is not an empathetic response. Indeed, given that you are just as much a stranger to me as almost all of the other seven billion people on the planet, anyone with empathy would *refuse* to privilege your irrational fears of the vaccine over the health and welfare of any and everyone else on the planet. The facts are these. Natural immunity is good but it doesn’t last forever. There are conflicting studies of whether natural or vaccine-induced immunity lasts longer, but it is indubitable that your natural immunity will wane. Whatever immunity you now have, it will be significantly higher if you add the vaccine. You had a very mild case of COVID (I’m happy to hear it). But people who are reinfected often have worse symptoms the second time around, and some people have died of it. Your chances of death from COVID are small. They will be orders of magnitude smaller if you get the shot. Side effects are extremely unlikely. You are more likely to be reinfected today than you are to suffer significant side effects from the shot. You are more likely to get hit by a bus than to suffer extraordinarily serious side effects. (That’s not a joke or a metaphor. It is literally true.)


_Hyzenthlay_

What I mean by empathetic is to try and understand how psychosis works. If you don’t understand this disease then your response will likely not resonate well. Telling people with psychosis that they’re just being delusional and irrational doesn’t help what so ever and can actually make things ten times worse. It’s not privileging someone’s fears it’s being understanding of an individuals disability and trying to help them understand in a way that they can receive the information properly. I already received an answer previously that addressed my concerns rather well so this is why I’m responding to you with this particular bit of info just in case you run into someone else with a similar condition. Addressing the “worse the second time around” a bit of info I did not include was that I had been infected with covid (99% sure) when it first started happening but doctors couldn’t properly diagnose it. Our whole family had the same thing but they diagnosed us all with random shit lmao. But yeah it wasn’t as bad the second time around that October I had gotten it (the time I mentioned in the post was the October one) it very well could be that a lot of people suffer worse the second time and others do rather well. But that’s with any illness


Cliffy73

I never said you were delusional. But if you are asking strangers for empathy, you should be prepared to extend it. And that means doing what you can to protect everyone around you.


_Hyzenthlay_

Also not to be rude I really don’t mean to be but when you say “your irrational fears” that is saying delusions. Or at least that is how it is received.


_Hyzenthlay_

I don’t think you understand my comment. I was talking about being understanding towards victims of psychosis specifically. Empathy may not be the right term specifically I guess but rather to be understanding that this condition requires a different approach. Also I am not being un empathetic to those around me. I am simply saying this particular question requires a different approach and am being more specific with what I’m seeking help with as to try to keep confusion as little as possible. I’m not saying “I’m not getting the vaccine because I don’t like it or care abt people1!1” I’m saying “hey I have a condition that impairs me and I need help so I can feel safer in order to better help myself and others”


Delehal

Medical studies have generally found that out of people who have recovered from COVID-19, people who later get vaccinated statistically have stronger protection than people who rely purely on natural immunity. So, it does make a difference. That's why public health experts are recommending vaccinations for most people.


_Hyzenthlay_

How do I know which vaccine they are giving me? And which one would be better for my personal immune system to work with the immunities my body has already given me? Edit: sorry I mean to ask how can I tell which vaccine might be best for me lol


Delehal

>How do I know which vaccine they are giving me? In my experience, they didn't usually let people pick. It's more like a line of people and they will randomly choose who gets what depending on what is available. If there is some reason why a person has a specific preference, they should probably ask about it. >which one would be better for my personal immune system to work with the immunities my body has already given me? Totally a fair question, but past my area of expertise. Might be something to chat with a doctor about if you want advice that is specific to your situation.


_Hyzenthlay_

Ooo tysm!!! I’ll definitely ask my doctor! I sometimes don’t make these connections in my head hahh ^^’ maybe I can try seeing which vaccines are being given where after I see my doctor or maybe he can refer me :0


BungeeBunny

Since the booster shot is the exact same thing - How does it help prevent more for Covid 19?


TheApiary

Vaccines are kind of like training for your immune system. It gets ok at fighting covid with one practice round, but it gets even better with more practice rounds. And if it goes too long between practices it starts to forget how to do it and needs another practice


Delehal

Vaccines prime your immune system so that it will respond quickly to a specific virus. Boosters are meant to enhance that effect in case it has faded over time.


BungeeBunny

Ah, will the effectiveness stay the same? Since there are newer variants now?


Delehal

Hard to predict the future with certainty, but so far the vaccines we have seem to be effective against variants. The rate of effectiveness varies, but it's still one of our best protections.


DrGrahamCrackers_

When Covid first came up why were people panic buying toilet paper?


Cliffy73

Roughly half of the time that people use the bathroom it was in offices and schools, etc. those places tend to use different paper and the factories that made consumer toilet paper were already running 24 hours a day. They could retool and expand, but they couldn’t do it quickly. So when people stopped going to work and school, they started using a lot more toilet paper at home while supply stayed relatively constant.


kcasper

It is a good point, however if people were buying what they used and no more the industry would have kept up without a problem. There was an element of panic buying where many households bought 6 months, or more, worth of toilet paper. Likewise after the panic buying stopped, the demand for toilet paper dipped for a number of months.


rewardiflost

Part of it is anxiety - and as u/kcasper said, this was something they could control. Part of it was also reality. People who are at work or school all day use toilet paper at those other places. When all those other places close down, you have to use your own paper. People are also snacking more, meaning more reasons to poop.


kcasper

They can't control the pandemic, but here is this one item they can control.


Gravity_Axe

Why do vaccinated people rag on unvaccinated people? I’ve gotten the shot, so therefore I don’t care if you haven’t; you’re not gonna get me sick regardless.


gamercboy5

It's not about personal protection, it's about stopping the spread so we can go back to normal. When people dont get vaccinated it allows the virus to continue spreading, and when it spreads a lot it mutates, creating variants. Variants might not be protected by the vaccine, so it is in everybody's interest to get vaccinated so we can stop spreading and mutations. Ragging on people is probably not the best way to convince them to get vaccinated, but there has been large anti-science rhetoric behind people who arnt getting the vaccine and it is hard to convince them otherwise. I think people are just frustrated we have a very clear solution to getting out of pandemic life and so many people are refusing to participate while also complaining about restrictions.


Dilettante

Vaccination does not provide 100% immunity (around 95% against Alpha, but only 60% or so against Delta), and not everyone can get immunized (like small children). That means that unvaccinated people, being more likely to spread the virus, make it more likely that vaccinated people and their loved ones will get Covid. ...*and* while covid is spreading, even vaccinated people need to wear masks and have other limits, so by not getting vaccinated they are also making my life harder in little ways.


IAmATuxedoKitty

very stupid question incoming: does wearing a mask long term change your nose shape? my nose is kinda smooshed from my mask that I wear every day for around 8 hours. would that change the shape of it in some way?


Fenix_Volatilis

It's just a skin depression. The same thing can happen with watches and such when worn tightly for long periods


Bobbob34

No, it's a mask. It can't change your bone structure.


[deleted]

Anti mask people. Is it a political principal, where you're aware of the risk but don't care.. or would you also demand, that a doctor doesn't wear gloves and mask during a surgery? What if the doctor demands it? Cause it's his right? Like yours? Would you accept surgery from a doctor who didn't wash hands and didn't wear gloves?


[deleted]

I honestly wonder?.. Infections from a doctor while getting treatment, is that a priority????


maywetalkabt

Legit question here. I'm not anti vax. I prefer to not group all vaccines under one umbrella. Corona virus is new so this causes more concern for me. Q: If vaccines are so well-tested and researched, why has Astra Zeneca been pulled out of many governments, while it was already well into rollout plans? It should have been well tested way before release, no? Why was it given AT ALL if the testing was secure? So, what are the real protocols these companies go through to deem vaccines "safe"... It's disheartening to see claimed safe vaccines being pulled out because of risky side effects. My aunt got one dose of AZ, it was recalled in our area and she had to get a second dose of another brand... If you have links on testing procedures, please send. I am more than willing to have an open discussion. Sincerely, Someone who cares about their long term health


[deleted]

I'm danish, where we did remove AstraZeneca as part of the official program. Also happened with Johnson and Johnson. This happened cause experts estimated a 0,08% chance of complications for middle aged woman.. But it was not completely removed, instead everyone who volunteered got a 20 min doctor stream/check, and then admitted or dismissed to this brand.. 35.000 people in Copenhagen got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine voluntary even though it wasn't official recommended.. My girlfriend tried,but was dined from the doctor, cause of some rare family deseases.. Anyhow, the main reason a country like Denmark picked and chosed between vaccines, was because there was enough, and zero objects about getting the vaccine itself (minus a very minimal amount)..


Bobbob34

>Q: If vaccines are so well-tested and researched, why has Astra Zeneca been pulled out of many governments, while it was already well into rollout plans? It should have been well tested way before release, no? Why was it given AT ALL if the testing was secure? It was well tested. First, stuff like the J&J (which is the same delivery method as AZ) has caused some issues on a one-in-500,000 / one-in-a-million case basis. That's not something you're going to know from testing, at all, because no testing has a half million participants. If there were not alternate vaccines, countries wouldn't dismiss AZ, because the complication rate is very low and fairly population specific, so there could just be more careful monitoring. However, there are other vaccines available, so why bother with something the public may distrust? The vaccines were all tested on like 40,000 people. But see above.


maywetalkabt

Thanks!! This makes sense 👍❤️


Fenix_Volatilis

Ok but doesn't it take most vaccines a decade+ to be released? So how is it possible that it would be up to our standards? What do/could we know about long term side-effects? I'm pro-vax but this is the ONE thing that's sketched me out from taking it Edit: oh, and on the flip side, if we CAN truly do it safely, why are most vaccines on the markets in <2 years? I know not *every* one is going to able to be figured out quickly, but they could save so many more lives


maywetalkabt

HONESTLYYYY Coming from a 21 year old woman here, I'm especially worried about fertility. There's so many pregnant women who get it and say, "I'm vaxxed and my baby is completely fine!!!" But how about... Egg fertilization. Conceiving AFTER being fully vaxxed. Conceiving after getting a BOOSTER SHOT. This stuff can't be tested within a year, can it? Guys, this stuff is stressing me out because I really wanna be a mother one day 🥺🥺 if anyone is still on this thread, do you have helpful resources about this? (Edit: pregnant women, not woman lol)


SuperCitizenKo

It doesn't make sense to compare these vaccines to how long it "usually" takes because vaccines are not usually made during unprecedented global pandemics. You are assuming vaccines *needed* to take a decade plus in the past, rather than them just happening to take that long. When not an emergency, scientists have to fight against a slow bureaucracy, money problems, unneccessary/bullshit paperwork, slowness to recruit volunteers (they need to be where the virus is, which is usually not literally everywhere), and other factors that draw out the process.


Fenix_Volatilis

It does make sense and I already got an actual answer. You don't need to come and and criticize me on *r/nostupidquestions* when I already have a detailed answer. Thanks, have a good one.


SuperCitizenKo

I'm just trying to show you how your thinking is flawed. This is an unprecedented situation. The normal rules do not apply. You are falsely interpreting "vaccines normally take 10 years" as "vaccines absolutely need to take 10 years or else they are sketchy." That is a false interpretation not supported by facts. It's okay to be scared but you have to realize that it can influence you to think illogically as you have.


Fenix_Volatilis

Ok buddy, I don't know if you're some medical expert but I'm not, high school biology was enough for me and that was about 14 years ago. What I asked was, if that's the normal time frame, how is this still safe? And I got a wonderful, well thought out response that if you took the time to read, they break it down. They *taught* me something. You're just be a self righteous dick trying to prove your point. Did I think it went through the normal process? No. Do I know ANYTHING about that process? Also no! So how the fuck am I supposed to understand an entire industry in an unprecedented pandemic? Hmmmmm?? I'm not scared anymore, the OTHER person gave me wonderful, well thought out information. YOU'RE just pissing me off. And you even quoted me that I said "normally" which, if you didn't know, *doesn't meant "absolutely need" , it means most of the time* Edit: I'm just blocking you. I came here to get educated, not attacked. Fuck right off


Bobbob34

> Ok but doesn't it take most vaccines a decade+ to be released? Not necessarily, but it depends largely on money and effort. If one is working on a vaccine it goes through steps. Like (just for instance), step 1, sequence the virus, step 2, decide what kind of vaccine they might like to try making, step 3, decide what part of the virus would be best used in the vaccine -- this could involve testing a whole bunch of parts, one after the other, then step 4, start basic testing, then 5. animal testing, then go back and redo something in step 3 and then have to do 4 and... And between each step, submit reports and make sure you're granted funding, lab time, etc., for the next step before you can proceed. Here, we threw basically every applicable company and all the money in the world at the problem, so instead of step 1, wait, get funding, time, workers, ok step 2, there were six labs working on step 1, and whomever got it first passed it on to the dozen labs workng on 2, labs all over the world working on finding the right piece so whomever got it raises a hand and passes it to the next step. It's like the difference between you making a sandwich at home. Get he bread, open, get slices, retie bread, go in fridge for mayo, use, put back. Consider what cheese you want. Get out and slice, put back... vs. making a sandwich at Subway, where one group comes in and chops and preps everything and lays it out so the next person can just grab the prepped stuff and make a whole sandwich in the time it takes you to get the bread out and retie the bag. All the same stuff happened, just many steps were done in coordination and simultaneously instead of waiting between each. > So how is it possible that it would be up to our standards? See above. Also, all the conspiracy stuff is oddly US based, while labs all around the world worked on this and many countries have much higher standards than the US and still approved the vaccines. What do/could we know about long term side-effects? Well, people have had the vaccine going on a year and a half now and they're still around. There is no vaccine, in the 200 or so years we've been using vaccines, that has had a side effect pop up out of nowhere after years. None. There's no reasonable mechanism by which that could even happen. The vaccine is out of your body in a week or two. All side effects tend to crop up in the first couple of weeks ish. Some can have lingering effects but none randomly show up 5 years later. Can't happen


Fenix_Volatilis

Medicine is *definitely* not one of my strong suits, but fortunately critical thinking it. I VERY much appreciate your explanation and you're absolutely correct 'above' absolutely explains 'below' So, if I understand this correctly, *if* there was a long term effect then it would be caused by something getting worse over the years and we'd already see signs. I know one guy who thinks it's a fertility treatment to slow population growth. If that were the case then we'd already be seeing things like lower sperm count, longer times between ovulation and/or producing less viable eggs, correct? As in (whatever long term effect it is) it would be starting NOW and just be worse later? I would not be surprised if this was caused by me not having a basic understanding of what a long term effect is lol Shockingly (not at all really) that's how I've come to know a lot of random stuff I don't think it's too odd that all the conspiracy theory stuff is US based. There's been hundreds of years of our government *literally* not to trust the other half of the government. Ergo, no body trusts the government at all. I sure as fuck don't. They don't care about us otherwise they'd remove privatized health care, for profit prisons and... I'mma shut up before I get *too* much on a rant lol its also because people confuse "everybody has the right to a voice" and "everybody's opinion is equal". We have a LOT of loud crazies. This one is in the city I live in! And DESPERATELY want out of lol https://maps.app.goo.gl/BMp2oLSTtegZYdvNA


Bobbob34

> So, if I understand this correctly, if there was a long term effect then it would be caused by something getting worse over the years and we'd already see signs. Yes, because the vaccine is out of your body after a short period. The point of a vaccine is to show your body a thing so it can then make its own antibodies for if it sees it again later. It's like if the virus is an ikea dresser and the vaccine is the instruction book to put it together. You give the vaccine and your body looks and says 'oh, ok, I get it, I need to get a phillips head, a hammer....' and puts the correct tools in a little pile for if you get the dresser, then tosses the instruction book because it has the tools all set up and has constructed stuff before. The tools were all yours to begin with. You make your own antibodies. There are things like Guilliane-Barre syndrome (which I probably spelled wrong but can't be arsed) that can have lasting effects, but you get it soon after the vaccine (it's a known, rare reaction to many vaccines, and sometimes to getting something like the flu with no vaccine involved. You trigger your immune system and it can overreact, same as an allergy, basically) > I know one guy who thinks it's a fertility treatment to slow population growth. If that were the case then we'd already be seeing things like lower sperm count, longer times between ovulation and/or producing less viable eggs, correct? As in (whatever long term effect it is) it would be starting NOW and just be worse later? Yes. The 'it'll make everyone infertile!' thing is a weird conspiracy theory (what would be the point?) but it's clearly not happening. People in the test groups have had children; plenty of vaccinated people have had children since being vaccinated. We'd notice. Rates of having kids did go down last year overall but that's nothing to do with the vaccine -- there'd be reports of increased infertility complaints. People didn't think it was a good idea to have kids in such an unstable time when many had lost jobs, etc. Also, there's no mechanism by which that could be an effect really. The thing with that is that people heard mRNA and either confused it with DNA or looked it up and saw that mRNA itself is involved in DNA, like in your body, which is full of your own mRNA. We started vaccines by rubbing pus from a sick person in a well person's cut. Then we got to being able to inject actual bits of virus. Then we figured out how to weaken or kill the virus and do it. Then we learned how to shut off the virus so it can't reproduce. Then we figured out how to use a bit of virus. This is just the next step, using a smaller bit, the protein code from the shell of the virus. That's all. All the 'there are spike proteins that can get in your body!!!' oeople are just, frankly, undereducated in science. There are dozens of corona viruses. They're called that because they have spikes. Several cause the common cold. Anyone who's had colds has had spike protein cells invade their cells throughout their body. It's not a big deal, it's just how they attach. Cells have all different shapes. Go look at a prion. >I don't think it's too odd that all the conspiracy theory stuff is US based. I mean it more because the vaccines and the whole thing is NOT US based. Like, it's a global pandemic, so why do ppl in the US think it's some conspiracy by their gov't or Bill Gates? The Pfizer vaccine is German. Just...


GameboyPATH

>If you have links on testing procedures, please send. [Wikipedia is often a great general-purpose resource](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford%E2%80%93AstraZeneca_COVID-19_vaccine#Clinical_trials). The article summarizes the findings and methodology of their research and provides citations to other articles for further reading. You may also want to read the section on "Adverse effects" to find statistics (w/ supporting sources) on how rare the possible side effects are.


SuperCitizenKo

As I understand, AZ was recalled by government bodies who are overly-cautious and prone to kneejerk reactions. It probably didn't need to be; as you say, it was well-researched. But you also have to understand that when you give out a vaccine to millions of people, the one-in-a-million side effects are going to appear. Vaccine trials will never be millions in size, so they're just not equipped to find one-in-a-million reactions before mass distribution. But no one should be worried about one-in-a-million things. The governments who recalled AZ likely overreacted due to other "safer" options being available.


Lutakein

I have been reading about healthcare workers quitting due to the vaccine mandates. Does this mean that most, if not all, medical professionals are unvaccinated? I am asking because there are nurses all over social media that are comparing the mandates to Nazi Germany.


Bobbob34

>I have been reading about healthcare workers quitting due to the vaccine mandates. Does this mean that most, if not all, medical professionals are unvaccinated? No, why would it mean that? Most are vaccinated. The unvaccinated are, in many places, being let go if they refuse to get vaccinated. Nurses have a lower vaccination rate than doctors, which is likely the same correlation that vaccination has to education across the board.


blablahblah

My area tracked how many healthcare workers were getting vaccinated, and by the time they stopped tracking in May, over 90% of doctors and nurses had been vaccinated (EMTs, on the other hand, not so much) What you're seeing if a combination of two things: 1. Those last few percent of nurses being very vocal and making compelling news headlines. 2. The non-medical professionals in the hospital system like cafeteria workers, secretaries, and janitors being no more scientifically literate than the rest of society.


rewardiflost

>Does this mean that most, if not all, medical professionals are unvaccinated? No, it just means that a vocal minority of medical professionals aren't vaccinated. Here in US - New Jersey, and nearby NYC, medical professionals who don't get vaccinated are getting fired, and their unions aren't even doing much to fight it. Annual flu vaccines have been mandatory in certain care settings for years. This is just one more mandatory vaccine. It's a common trope that when an argument devolves to Hitler or Nazis - that means there is no more logic left in their argument.


TryingInNJ

Not at all. You keep reading about them because someone leaving their job is a more interesting story than someone staying at their job. Nurses are all over social media comparing mandates to Nazi Germany, but other nurses are all over social media just quietly living their lives. For example, a North Carolina hospital system recently fired 175 employees who haven't been vaccinated. Sounds like a lot, but it's actually a really small amount of the hospital system's 35,000+ member workforce


XxpillowprincessxX

**Q: If the measures schools are taking can’t even prevent a cold from spreading, how am I supposed to believe my kids won’t catch Covid if it was brought into the school?** P.S. This is not a “gotcha” question, I need someone to ease my nerves bc I’m a worrier about my kids lol. I have to pick my kids up from school because they have runny noses and get them cleared by their dr before they can return. No fever, no coughing, no sneezing, no Hershey squirts. I understand the strict rules of getting them cleared before returning and I fully respect them. But what I don’t understand is how some other crotch goblin(s) managed to fly under the radar long enough to get my son(s) sick (not sure if one got the other sick or if they both got sick from school). And what the likelihood of them contracting Covid is when they got a cold so easily with masks and “social distancing” (an arm length apart. Their arm length at 5 and 7 yo, so under the 3 ft requirement they told us they did have).


SurprisedPotato

There is some evidence that COVID will eventually *become* just another common cold virus. Specifically, there are common cold viruses that are very closely related to some strains of bovine coronavirus, and evidence that the cow and human lineages diverged around 1891, which suspiciously coincides with a pandemic called the "Russian Flu" pandemic that killed 1 million people, with symptoms that are suspiciously similar to COVID. Before COVID becomes yet another common cold, it will pass through the nostrils of practically every person on the planet, killing about 1 in 100 of those unfortunate enough to not yet be vaccinated (depending on their age etc etc). COVID was very infectious from the start, and in less than a year, the delta strain appeared, which is even more infectious. More strains that are even more infectious are likely in the future. The long-term projection is that it would eventually be as infectious as the common cold. The common cold is so incredibly infectious that basically everyone is exposed to it before the age of two. As we age, we don't get seriously ill from cold viruses, since we're exposed to the various cold viruses again and again continually. Unless our immune system is compromised. COVID \*probably\* is not as infectious as a cold virus that's had decades or centuries to evolve in us. But it is very infectious already, and will get there one day.


XxpillowprincessxX

Even if it’s not as infectious as a cold, I still have a hard time seeing how any of their measures are going to work if the virus is introduced to the school. Most elementary school kids aren’t old enough to be vaccinated. And as you said, Covid is much more dangerous to the unvaxxed. Are you trying to say their measures are mostly bs and won’t do anything to prevent the spread of the virus among hundreds of unvaxxed children?


SurprisedPotato

I wouldn't want to say it won't do \*anything\*. Personally, I doubt that it would do \*enough\*, but I'm not an expert. Here's some solid info on COVID and kids: [https://www.childrens.health.qld.gov.au/blog-covid-19-and-kids-what-you-need-to-know/](https://www.childrens.health.qld.gov.au/blog-covid-19-and-kids-what-you-need-to-know/)


XxpillowprincessxX

It sounds a lot like “we think the risk outweighs any cons and if your child happens to be one of the unlucky ones, oops”


SurprisedPotato

:(


AntonioH02

Can I go to the gym one day after I got the second covid vaccine(Pfizer)??


Delehal

If the gym requires that you are "fully vaccinated", that typically means two weeks after your second dose. That gives time for your immune system to react to the vaccine and build immunity. Other than that, yes. Depending on how you react to the vaccine, you might feel too tired and sore to want to exercise.


AntonioH02

Thank you


tenfingersrobbie

Do we know how effective the vaccines are in the days following the second dose? I'm aware that they are only fully effective after 2 weeks, but are they partially effective immediately, or after a few days? Do we have a rough idea of how much so? i.e. 10%? 40% etc.?


SurprisedPotato

In the days following the second dose, it will at least be as effective as the single dose. So that's about 30-40% if my memory serves me. The second dose won't kick in instantly, it will take at least a day or three for the message to get back to the relevant part of the immune system that there's an invader at the injection site, and then it has to recognise it as one it saw earlier. Here's an awesome video giving the basics of how the immune system works: https://youtu.be/lXfEK8G8CUI


tenfingersrobbie

That's a great video. Thanks for the info too!


SurprisedPotato

You're welcome :)


healthfreedom4all

Why isn't natural immunity being recognized? Isn't the point of getting vaccinated to produce antibodies against the virus? So if you had the virus and produced antibodies, why do you need to be vaccinated? Don't you already have what's needed to protect yourself?


Hatherence

Recommendations to get the vaccine after getting covid does *not* mean natural immunity isn't being recognized. It's because we have data showing that people who get covid and *then* get the vaccine have incredibly strong immunity. The vaccine helps everyone, whether they've had covid before or not, so that is why the vaccine is still recommended. It's been known from fairly early on that it is possible to catch covid twice. Catching it once is not, in fact, guarantee that you have what's needed to protect you. [Source](https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/science.abj2258)


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Hatherence

Great question! I'm not personally involved in the process, but my guess is these two reasons: * Convalescent plasma was studied before covid vaccines. Technically speaking, one could argue that we should study vaccinated plasma separately in order to determine if it works. * We now have monoclonal antibodies. These work pretty much just like convalescent plasma, except they can be grown in a lab, they do not have to be extracted from a person. There's no risk of bloodborne disease transmission, or incompatibility from transfusions (plasma is generally fine to give anyone, but there are cases where certain people should only get certain types of plasma which can complicate matters)


blablahblah

In many places it is. For example, international travelers coming to the US can present a negative test from within the last 3 days or a positive test from within the last three months and a doctor's note clearing them to fly. The problem is that we have much better infrastructure for tracking vaccinations than tracking previous infections or antibody presence (antibodies only typically last a few months, after that your body just has the cells that can make more antibodies). There's also evidence that vaccines improve immunity for people who were previously infected ([source](https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2021/s0806-vaccination-protection.html)) so you may as well get vaccinated anyway.


healthfreedom4all

I am not against being vaccinated, but I do still have antibodies AND I donate convalescent plasma. You can not donate that type of plasma if you get vaccinated where I live. " Convalescent refers to anyone recovering from a disease. Plasma is the yellow, liquid part of blood that contains antibodies. Antibodies are proteins made by the body in response to infections. Convalescent plasma from patients who have already recovered from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may contain antibodies against COVID-19. Giving this convalescent plasma to hospitalized people currently fighting COVID-19 may help them recover. FDA has issued an emergency use authorization for convalescent plasma to be used in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and is being investigated for the treatment of COVID-19. Based on scientific evidence available, the FDA concluded this product may be effective in treating COVID-19 and that the known and potential benefits of the product outweigh the known and potential risks of the product in hospitalized COVID-19 patients." My antibodies are still going strong 11 months later. I know I may be an anomaly but I take extremely good care of my health. I run 5 miles a day 5 times a week, weight train at least 4 days. I don't drink, do drugs, smoke cigarettes and I have ceased smoking marijuana. I take a daily multivitamin, omegas, and keep my use of medications like aspirin to a non existent level. I knew right away when I had covid because I felt a weird anxiety in my body, I just felt off. I never had any fevers or major symptoms, just a slight headache, the anxiety feeling and then shortly to follow, a loss of smell and taste for 3 days. (This was before the vaccine was available as my infection was in October of 2020). I donate CPlasma every 3 weeks, twice a week (they need two collections in the span of 3 days to create one donation). They check my antibodies at the center I donate plasma in, and even they are amazed I still have the antibodies. Thank you for taking the time to respond to me. I appreciate you not just berating me for asking a question. I haven't been able to find the answers I'm looking for because everything seems to keep changing as time goes on. I'm sorry this is long, I just figured I would explain everything the best I can before the reddit crowd down votes and attacks me.


teal_mc_argyle

Is the pneumonia part of covid contagious in a different way than covid itself? If A has covid and passes it to B, and B develops pneumonia, can A then get sick again? I know this is more stupid than the average question but I genuinely don't know and this isn't hypothetical.


SuperCitizenKo

Pneumonia is an infection. Infections can be contagious, but in this case the infection is just COVID. It's not any different than "COVID itself;" it is COVID itself.


tobesteve

Medical professionals went from being called heroes and essential, to being fired if they don't vaccinate. I'm very pro vaccine, my question is: have they been mistaken for essential and heroes in 2020? If not, then maybe we shouldn't be calling for their layoffs?


SuperCitizenKo

>Medical professionals went from being called heroes and essential, to being fired if they don't vaccinate Just stop and think about what you wrote here. They're heroes if they're heroes. Imagine if you wrote, "medical professionals went from being called heroes and essential, to being fired if they defecate on the hospital floor so weird right???" Heroes stop being heroes when they do things that are deemed firable offenses. They don't get a free pass. It's not unusual to require people who work with sick patients to be vaccinated.


Delehal

Why does it need to be an either-or situation? We can admire their heroism without giving them a free pass to make dangerous choices.


rewardiflost

There are lots and lots of vaccine mandates every year - where medical professionals are required to take flu vaccines, especially in public-facing jobs. If medical people are making a choice that endangers the public, then they don't need the job. They were heroes, and should be recognized for that. But they don't get a pass for current bad behavior. We call our military servicemen heroes. We still arrest them if they come home and start shooting up a Walmart. We call our police heroes when they save a kidnapping victim, but we still don't want them killing people over forged money. I'm not sure where your hospitals are laying off, either. Here in (USA) New Jersey and nearby NYC, vaccines are mandatory. Employees are being fired for failing to follow mandatory work rules.


SurprisedPotato

It's important to look past the hype at the core issue. When medical professionals were being called "heroes", there were reports that at least some didn't like it. They would have preferred if their various governments took steps to contain the spread of COVID and stop it, rather than being told what a wonderful job they were doing (but not being given any hazard pay etc) But that aside, it is true that many did, indeed, act heroically. Now, if a medical professional refuses basic precautions to keep their patients safe, then they should not be permitted to work with patients. That's just common sense, and has nothing to do with whether or not they acted heroically heroic last year, or performed an essential role in the pre-vaccine era.


[deleted]

When will Covid be manageable enough for us to not wear masks in every building in cities? I'm a college student with a good beard, and finally out of my 7,000 population hometown. Some women like beards so mandating masks obliterates that as an attractive physical trait. I've been vaccinated. All college-age people can get vaccinated, that's on them. But mainly, I'd like to not feel super tense and jittery all the time, which walking kilometers across campus all day with a mask will do that to you. There is a difference in breathing masked vs unmasked, I'm not out of shape, I run actually. It's the same as sleeping clothed or unclothed, less on you means less tension. Juggling a double major, minor, running, clubs and prepping for studying abroad is kind of a lot. That plus anxiety makes for a stressful mask experience. And many nights I only sleep like 3 hrs. It's not like I'm stationary all day watching TV. It's stressful and could make me age faster than without being masked, I wear it all day. Preventing children and elderly's lives from being lost is noble, but if it exacerbates my anxiety and ages me like the presidency did to Obama, then this isn't worth it. At least now that vaccines are widely available. I'm no Trumper, but I don't want to spend 5 more years of not being able to breathe in/out fully when I'm stressed , all day. I'll get vaccines whenever available, I got the flu shot today. But I don't need this additional stress. I don't want a ministroke just because passing Covid indirectly could kill someone that likely would die anyway. Yes it's not always people with preexisting conditions, it could kill anyone. But the world has never been perfect and my well-being has value of its own. Tl;dr version: Lots of college stress, anxiety already. Masks are uncomfortable and make me feel tense. I'll stand by science no matter what, I just wish it didn't mean making myself uber-stressed and maybe age faster.


rewardiflost

> When will Covid be manageable enough for us to not wear masks in every building in cities? There is no way to predict the future. This is different in every nation, every US state, and many US cities. It's a local issue that is up to your local authorities, and your college authorities. At colleges in my state, nearly all of them allow people to stay maskless outdoors. No, not all college-age people can get vaccinated. There are people that have severe reactions to some of the ingredients in each vaccine. If an alternative isn't available, they cannot get vaccinated. Most can, but not "all". If you have problems with anxiety, and it is having so many negative effects on your life, then I suggest you speak to a therapist or other mental health professional about it. Many US colleges have free or reduced fee services available right on campus. Hopefully they can help you feel better!


Cliffy73

Wearing a mask does not make you age faster. You sound like you’re facing some common issues with anxiety and workload for people your age, and the mask is not the problem. You might profitably speak to a counselor. In the meantime, it’s impossible to answer that question. If everyone had gotten the vaccines when they became available, then we would be farther along than we are. But due to recalcitrance and a scary variant, this is the way things are for now, and masking is going to be with us for a while.


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ihatemyself_somuch

hi guys, im going to a concert at the Forum in LA, and i'm unvaccinated unfortunately. they require either proof of vaccination or a negative test within 3 days of the show. i'm planning on taking a test 2 days before the concert, but does anyone have an idea on how it would be checked? i don't have an ID or anything, so would it be acceptable to just show them my test, or would i have to provide proof of my identity to show that the test results are mine?


SuperCitizenKo

You should call and ask. Here in NYC they only accept vaccination and are supposed to confirm with ID.


bridgeb0mb

sorry, dumb questions, ive just been living under a rock the past year. barely leaving my house, v depressed and extremely anorexic, so that's why i haven't gotten my vaccine till today. ive never been antivax, ive felt guilty this whole time for not having it. i know it's not an excuse and i am sorry. i just got my first shot and i have two questions. is my vaccine card only valid after the second shot? or can i use it to get into places where it is required before i get my second shot. also, should i avoid people today since i just got it? i am next level dumb. thanks for replies in advance. can't wait till i get my second shot (20 days from now). im 50% so relieved rn haha


Bobbob34

The vaccine requirements differ from place to place and thing to thing, so there's not one answer. Some places require 'fully vaccinated' which you're not until 2 weeks after your second dose. Some places require 'at least one dose' -- which you have but which won't be effective until 2 weeks from now. Which leads to your second question. You can go about your normal business, but fully masked and as distanced as possible, until you're fully vaxxed. One dose provides some protection, but it only kicks in after 2 weeks -- the vaccine works by showing your body a piece of the code from the virus then your body has to run around and make antibodies and store the info for itself. It takes a bit. Congrats on getting vaccinated! If you have any side effects (most people don't besides a sore arm, you just hear about people who do more than people who are like 'eh, felt fine,' you can also take whatever otc stuff you normally would, if you feel achy or feverish.


BungeeBunny

Is the booster Pzifer shot the same exact thing as the first and second dose?


rewardiflost

Yes. [source](https://news.uchicago.edu/story/what-you-should-know-about-covid-19-booster-shots-and-third-vaccine-doses) , [source](https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-receive-first-us-fda-emergency-use)


greatsirius

Why is congress not mandated to take the vaccine?


rewardiflost

They don't work for a department that the US President controls.


greatsirius

I understand that much, shouldn't some other branch mandate it though?


Bobbob34

The legislature is its own branch.


greatsirius

I realize that but I still believe there should be some type of enforcement


rewardiflost

Congress makes their own rules. They would have to pass their own rule or law to make that happen.


greatsirius

There should be something that makes congress adhere to the same code of conduct and protocol for its citizens if they're actively pushing for it. Do you agree?


rewardiflost

In a much better world, sure. But they don't have the same retirement benefits, medical benefits, or rules about insider trading that the citizens have. They get to write their own raises. I have very little expectation that they are going to self-govern with this kind of beneficent ideal.


greatsirius

I appreciate your response. It's rather unfortunate that an estimated 20% are still unvaccinated. I guess keep on keeping on.


IHaveNoBallz

If covid is here to stay, then why the fuck do I have to keep wearing a mask? I'm a fully vaccinated student in a small classroom with six other students. Professor doesn't bother to wear his mask half the time. Half the guys in there aren't wearing theirs correctly. Am I to really to believe this thin piece of cloth is doing fuck all? Because quite frankly I'm sick of wearing it.


SurprisedPotato

If other people are taking the virus *less* seriously, then it becomes *more* of a danger to you (and them, of course), and it would be wise to be *more* diligent about proper precautions.


Cliffy73

Yes, the thin piece of cloth does do fuck all. It dramatically reduces your likelihood of spreading the virus to other people. If you believe others are not wearing their masks correctly, ask them to do better. If you don’t feel comfortable doing so in the moment, email the head of your professor’s department.


Jtwil2191

Because lots of people aren't vaccinated yet. And allowing the virus to move unrestricted through the population is how we ended up with mutations like the Delta variant. Don't blame the people encouraging masks and wearing masks for the current situation. Blame the people refusing to do anything "in the name of freedom". If everyone who could get vaccinated was getting vaccinated, we might very well not need to wear masks anymore.


tenfingersrobbie

What's the deal with folks saying the Pfizer vaccine is killing people?


pyjamatoast

People die every day. Some people die after going to the grocery store. Some people die after watching The Big Bang Theory. Some people die after eating spaghetti. Some people die after taking a shower. Some people die after playing GTA. Some people die after getting a vaccine. It doesn't mean that any of those things *caused* the person to die. It's just that you will always have been doing *something* before you die, so the antivaccine people have decided to take two unrelated events and pretend that they are related in order to scare people away from getting the vaccine.


kcasper

There is a lot of conspiracy bullshit. VAERS system tracks deaths that happen within a time period of events such as vaccinations. There are thousands of people that died within two weeks of getting the vaccine. Conspiracy theorists are proposing that events such as traffic accidents can be caused by the vaccine. And former, now fired, Professor Dolores Cahill has said: >Anyone who’s over 70 who gets one of these mRNA vaccines will probably sadly die within about two to three years.    Absolutely no idea where this statement came from. But variations of it get said a lot.


Jtwil2191

They're lying and spreading dangerous conspiracy theory bullshit.


Mr_hungry_face

Is the misinformation with memes,facebook, instagram, etc as simple as "Russia is feeding Americans bullshit about the vaccine so nobody will get vaxxed and economy and society stays down?" I'm just baffled by how many anti-vaxxers there are in this country. Meanwhile other parts of the world are begging for the vaccine.


Jtwil2191

Russian disinformation efforts are exploiting and amplifying existing prejudices and and divisions in the American populace with their efforts. If those fault lines didn't already exist, Russia would have a much harder time getting results with their efforts.


Cliffy73

It would be nice to think that the number of stupid, pig-headed Americans is completely generated by hostile foreign action. But, sadly, while Russia is certainly *amplifying* anti-vax sentiment, in an educated and reasonable population, those attacks wouldn’t work.


Mr_hungry_face

So it's just a culture thing I guess. I can't really wrap my head around why people want to be so contrarian about this issue.


Lutakein

I know for a fact that Governors like Abbott and DeSantis are doing nothing about Covid in their states, even going as far as making it illegal to do anything about the virus. What are they hoping to accomplish by getting everybody sick?


Dilettante

Gain the support and goodwill of the constituents who voted them into power in the first place.


Lutakein

For me, I feel like it has a lot to do with the Angry Pumpkin. Those two Governors are people who are strong supporters of that man, and like him believe that the virus is a plot against him.


okbutwtflmfao

Another question: How long until this is over? I’m guessing if people haven’t been vaccinated yet, they’re unlikely to do so at this point. So knowing we can’t reach the 80%+ required to eradicate this, how much longer until things are more normal? I know things are never going back to the way they were, but I’m really sick of being scared. I also hate wearing a mask because of anxiety, so I’d like to know how much longer I have to deal with doing so.


Reset108

How much longer you have to wear a mask will vary a lot from place to place. Some businesses are still requiring them for employees and customers, some aren’t. Different states have different policies regarding masks. You don’t have to wear a mask if you’re not required to.


okbutwtflmfao

I don’t mean in terms of mandates, I just mean more that I’m sick of covid and want to know when things will be normal again. I know wearing a mask is the safe thing to do so I’ll keep doing it regardless of the mandates


okbutwtflmfao

Have any of you had COVID within the last few months and feel totally normal except for your sense of smell? I was exposed to COVID about a month ago and felt sick even though my test came back negative (maybe I tested too soon, or maybe it was just something else). One of my symptoms was my sense of smell got weird. Things were more muted and I had to sniff really hard to smell certain things. This lasted for a couple of days to a week, then it was fine, then the problem came back when my allergies flared up. I’ve never had this problem with allergies before. Now it’s mostly normal again but every once in a while I have a weird/gross smell stuck in my nose, I think? Also super weird but my sweat seems to smell different and my hygiene routine hasn’t changed nor has my products I use. Has this happened to anyone else? I’m vaxxed if it matters.


water_light_show

It’s called parosmia- I’m still experiencing it almost a year after covid. Shit sucks- everything smells and tastes like burnt gasoline


Bobbob34

That sounds very much like what's been happening to many people due to covid infection, but obviously no one can diagnose you from an internet post. https://www.bostonherald.com/2021/03/27/bizarre-new-symptom-of-coronavirus-makes-everything-smell-awful/ [https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20201109/covid-19-can-warp-the-senses-even-after-recovery](https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20201109/covid-19-can-warp-the-senses-even-after-recovery) And this is an article about people trying to fix their sense of smell -- [https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/03/covid-19-smell-recovery-its-own-strange-experience/618357/](https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/03/covid-19-smell-recovery-its-own-strange-experience/618357/) There are studies ongoing too. If you see a dr who specializes, you can ask, or check the natl database if you're interested.


okbutwtflmfao

Yep, that sounds exactly like what I’m trying to describe. Makes me wonder if my sweat doesn’t actually smell different, but that I’m perceiving it to have changed. It’s all so very odd!


BungeeBunny

Is the booster Pzifer shot the same exact thing as the first and second dose?