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iowa20

I’ve been analyzing a lot of competitive shooters in USPSA. What I’ve noticed is that most professional competitors don’t even wait til the magazine is empty/ or slide locked to the rear. I know in IDPA you can’t do that. I’m trying to get into USPSA this year. I’ve already have my rig setup. Awesome work commander!!!! Seems like you’re shooting with 10 rounders, you’re doing mag reloads on 8. Footwork and transitions are looking sharp.


commandersway

That's great to hear, dude! Feel free to reach out. Can catch me in the discord. Happy to go through gear, match planning, etc as you jump into your first match. Regarding reloads, yes, that's one of the differences between the two orgs. USPSA you reload when you want. The key there is maximizing time between target arrays so you perform standing-reloads less. For low-capacity divisions (production, limited 10, single stack) or ban states (NJ NY CA etc) you have to plan arrays accordingly. For high cap, you can often run an entire medium stage without reloading once. You work with what you have, ofc, and plan reloads accordingly. I shoot production. So regardless of the state, m limited to 10 so how I stage plan differs entirely (often times) from an Open shooter. Even if skill weren't an issue, you'll still see differences in attacking a stage simply because engaging certain targets might be easier in one position for one division but different for another division. Edit: forgot to mention, you typically plan a reload before your last few rounds because you may need make up shots. So best to engage an array with full gun rather than short. Sometimes you end on a slide lock which is great if you ran the stage just tight enough. Sucks when you have to make 1 shot but have you reload for that bullet though lol it happens.


iowa20

That’s good to know. I’ll start with production. I have a Shadow 2 optics ready. I’m comfortable with the gun. The only problem I have, which I need to be trained with is the double action in the beginning shot. I just need to compromise with my other hobbies if I want to do this seriously.


commandersway

General recommendations before jumping into a match include: be able to safely load and unload gun, be able to clear malfunctions. The rest you can pretty much learn as you go. General safety rules apply ofc (don't flag yourself or others). Double action was tricky for me too. Had to REALLY up my grip technique to support a da/sa course of fire. I can't say I've mastered it but I work around my skill gap as best as possible as I go. You'll give different schools of thought on the subject of trigger prep. You'll have folks like Ben Stoeger who teaches to smack the trigger all the way thru and mitigate gun movement with a grip, and then softer approaches like prepping the trigger too the wall until ready to shoot. Different strokes for different folks. The ofc take into consideration the context. Bullseye shooting you typically don't want to smack trigger. But when running a stage and shooting pairs, you can get away with it. Plenty to boil down.


iowa20

Yup I heard those trigger prep and avoiding the click on the reset from Racazza for faster shooting. I think I should stay on the basics first then move slowly to trigger. I would love to shoot with you one day and pick your brain.


commandersway

For sure. Jump into the discord and can coordinate.


rocktomb774

Nice


AmericanPartizan

Indeed