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rio425ee

One of the many reasons why we should be investing in train and bike infrastructure as hard as possible. The leading cause of potholes is the sheer enormity of weight that travels across it unnecessarily, there is literally no cost effective material that can stand up to the frequency we traffic obscene weight over on a daily basis. Shipping via train gets the frankly stupid amount of freight trucks that are the biggest cause, and bike infrastructure and walkable cities mean trips that would otherwise have to be taken in the car now have a viable alternative, meaning less cars on the road, safer trips when you do actually travel, and the roads last significantly longer and cost less in taxes as a result.


Cake-OR-Death-

I'm going to sound like a moron if I'm wrong, but didn't Romans also use horses to get around?


rio425ee

Yeah but suggesting we invest in horse infrastructure isn't going to gain popular support. Just about every roman road opened to car traffic got wrecked almost instantly bc cars and trucks are just that destructive, they survive for thousands of years with minimal maintenance and the first school bus or moving truck to drive over it and it just crumbles


Cake-OR-Death-

No I meant the horses and carriages were heavy.


rio425ee

A heavy horse comes in a little under a ton, a heavy carriage around the same, that's about a smallish car, there are all kids of SUVs, trucks, busses etc, and then the real damage dealers freight trucks. Then think about the difference in speed, and how many cars vs horses travel on a roadway, rubber tires are actually more rough on roadways than horseshoes are on stone. Horses are definitely heavy but cars are in another class. An 18wheeler can weigh 80,000lbs and there are millions of them driving all across the country fucking up our roads costing us money and polluting like crazy when we could be using trains to move that more efficiently and with less damage bc steel wheels have less drag coefficient than rubber. Roads would last much longer and 1000x safer if we got trucks off them, and even longer still if we reduced unnecessary car trips with bike paths and walkable cities....Maybe a few horse trails would be nice too tho


Cake-OR-Death-

Like I said I'm a moron.


rio425ee

I certainly wouldn't say that, context benefits us all lol


P0ST_M4L0NE

Here in michigan, there’s always road construction and yet when they finish they do it again in a couple months


Sabertooth414

They still haven't fixed 60th n main bro that shit ducks dass


cutyolegsout

Asphalt is fairly cheap. Stonework is not cheap.


Flopolopagus

Also, driving on a stone road is not smooth.


Flopolopagus

Just as an FYI as someone in the industry, there are a few reasons this happens but mainly it's the road crews. There are a lot of good ones out there, but there are also a lot of bad ones. I work in quality control for an asphalt emulsion plant. We have to make sure our products meet strict standards set by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) or else they may have to rip up the road if they find we sold product that didn't meet those specs. I believe the same applies to our hot mix asphalt plant for the actual pavement as well. In the binder lab (binder meaning the asphalt cement, commonly referred to as binder since it 'binds' the aggregate together) they have quite a few very expensive pieces of testing equipment that they test each mix formula before it goes to the road crews. So if the product must be good before it is used, then the fault must generally lie with road crews. I've heard of crews being impatient and paving on our tack coat (like a glue that binds each layer of pavement together) before it sets up, which will lead to them "tracking" the tack coat and leaving exactly where the tires drive over the road with no tack between layers which causes those pot holes right where your tires go over. I've also more recently was contacted by a DOT that our product failed a specific test. Now that is odd because I tested the product and it was well within spec. Our accredited lab also tested the product from our tank and got the exact same result. The DOT took a sample from the paving crew's tank and found it to be way out of spec. The paving crew either had some other incompatable product in the tank or they cut it with diesel but they're denying it. Lots of weird shit in this industry.


Tyrus824

Anche tu sei italiano?