T O P

I went on my first ride ever yesterday, and I have a few questions on different topics.

I went on my first ride ever yesterday, and I have a few questions on different topics.

Aaasteve

I’m 6-4 and with a back that doesn’t have a lot of bend in it. I use 2” risers and they help, by reducing how much I have to bend over, it lets me ride a bit more upright, less strain in my back. I got them from RockyMountain. I also have an extended shift lever to give me more room for my clown feet and I have large pegs to give a bit more stability. Sometimes yes in the phone, sometimes no, it depends on where and with whom I’m riding. Pants pocket, hip pack, it doesn’t matter. Don’t hold on so tight with your arms/hands. Really tightening and squeezing the bike with your legs will help avoid the WT. No on the rear guard, haven’t had a problem, but I might just be lucky.


Watts300

>I’m 6-4 ... I use 2" risers and they help That's encouraging - I'll see if I can find some that tall that fit my Honda and my budget. \> Really tightening and squeezing the bike with your legs will help avoid the WT. I'll work on that some more. Does leaning forward help you much at all? Sometimes when I was leaning forward, it felt like I was pretty far forward and might lose my balance and slam the handle bars. It didn't happen, that's just how I'd describe my feeling of discomfort.


KTMtexDev

Try rolling your bars forward to help with your throttle issue. It’ll help you keep your elbows out too and give you better control


Watts300

I hadn't thought of that. Good idea. I'll give it a try.


myflagisafuckingleaf

Nice, that’s a great offroad bike for a guy who just went on his first ride ever, but as you get more skilled that bike is going to remain a ton of fun. You should get your moneys worth outta that thing easy! 1. I’m 6ft tall and haven’t bothered with risers. No useful input for you there haha. 2. Grip more on the sides of the bike with your legs and focus on proper riding technique. Look up stuff on youtube like AJ Catanzaro’s “Attack Position”. When you’re in the right position on the bike and use your legs to hold on, it takes a ton of the weight out of your arms, so you can focus on just using your hands to operate the controls. (This is why guys like AJ can rip around so fast [one-handed](https://youtu.be/5EPvWddL3VY)). 3. Definitely in a backpack somewhere near the top, or maybe on a fender or gastank bag on the bike itself. Somewhere that I’m not likely to fall on it. Maybe one of those armband phone holder things, if its secure enough? Works well on my mountain bike. 4. Motocross guy. No input haha.


Watts300

I checked out his "private lesson" attack position video. I just learned from him that what I was doing was wrong - he says if your quadriceps are doing more work than hamstrings, you're doing it wrong. I woke up today with really sore quads. :) He explains well; he seems to be a good teacher. I'll watch more of his content. Thanks for replying.


drakewithdyslexia

At your height that bike won’t ever really fit great. You can try risers but you may find they adversely affect handling. A good place to start is upgrading to oversized bars, you’ll need an adapter which will act as a small riser, then you can try a bar bend with more rise. I don’t like to go too high. I’m around 6 4 and use a Henry Reed pro taper bend with no risers. Also keep in mind you may need to change all your control cables if you go too high as they sometimes end up too short. For the phone I’d just keep it in your pack. I ruined a phone camera trying the bar mounted options.


Schnitzelgruben

1. I'm only 6 foot so I can't help you there 2. You'll naturally learn throttle control with experience but for now, try keeping your wrists level to the ground instead of in a more aggressive downward facing position. 3. Phone stays in my fanny pack. 4. Yes and yes.


Watts300

2. Ahh. I was actually doing the opposite thinking that angling my wrist down would help. Oops. Talk about counterproductive. 🙃 3,4. Other peoples’ experience helps me plan future purchases, so thanks for sharing.


bentripin

1. RC High Bar in forward position kicked a little forward, Fastway pegs on Low made a massive improvement in my riding comfort.. I can stand all day now @ 6'4" 2. Cover the clutch 3. Water Blatter on Back 4. Nope, I did about 5 miles of heavy uphill rock garden last weekend in Southern Colorado and made it out unscathed.. got nice gummy tires tho. 5. \*bonus\* buy some nice boots asap


Watts300

I’ve got a pair of Fox Racing Instinct coming today. I hope they fit. :)


ktm429

I am not 6'4 but I do like a taller bars. I've got 10mm risers and KX high bars.


CheetoNYC

1. 6’3” and I use risers on my 250. I think they are 1” or 1.5”. I had the same issues as you starting out and the risers helped. You don’t want to be standing straight up though so work on body position. Lots of YT videos on it. 2. Agree with everyone’s advice to use your legs to hold the bike more and to avoid the death grip. I also keep two fingers over both the brake and clutch levers. Those two fingers help reduce your grip on the throttle and the clutch is your safety net for whiskey throttle. You could also try a progressive throttle tube like G2. 3. Pants (don’t recommend the phone mount on handlebars if you have an iPhone - Google camera shake). 4. I have one but it doesn’t usually get abused. My plastics and hand guards have taken the most direct hits from laying down, whacking trees, etc. Hard to keep a bike pretty on challenging trails so I don’t even bother trying.


Watts300

1. Based on the responses here, seems like riders are worth trying. I found a pair and ordered them and a water pack. 2. Body position- I definitely don’t have that figured out yet. Granted, I rode for 45 miles my first day, but my quadriceps are sore as hell. I’ll be more aware next trip out, and watch some videos between now and then.


CheetoNYC

Sore quads will subside with more riding time and confidence. A lot of that is just nerves. The more nervous we are the more we tense up our muscles (or death grip) and that wears you down fast. I’m constantly having to remind myself to relax and breath whether it’s dirt bikes, mtb bikes or skiing. That CRF can do 90% of the work underneath you while you stand on the pegs and just work the throttle, clutch, brakes and a little body lean. Time to go ride!! Have fun!


useles-converter-bot

45 miles is the height of 41696.3 'Samsung Side by Side; Fingerprint Resistant Stainless Steel Refrigerators' stacked on top of each other.


Tech7MX

Others here gave you the best advice tbh! So I will add that the Fastway Pro Air EXT foot pegs help with hill climbing/casing jumps/fly through whoops. Much easier to ground the heel for extra control and helps take some of that death grip away too. You will learn to use your legs, hips and arms etc to do the work and make it easier on your back and hands and you will see that your able to ride much longer my friend, I've seen guys at the track/trail burn out in 15 minutes, others ride over an hour, just depends. Have fun broski 🤠👍


Watts300

I just watched a video some one here linked of a couple guys on a track. They reminded me of birds that can do this: https://imgur.com/a/vF5cNnB Their bodies are moving all around absorbing impact while their upper is pretty smooth and steady. Impressive.


OhMyGodItsSoOhMy

2: Like someone else suggested, angle your bars forward. Try and keep your wrists flat when you’re giving throttle, it feels unnatural to feel like your not twisting when you actually are but you’ll get used to it. 4: I have no idea weather or not I even have a rear brake guard, so it probably isn’t that important.


volks03

Bar risers absolutely help a ton for better standing position. I run about 1.5” rise at 6 foot tall. I’ve got a buddy that had trouble finding tall enough risers and ended up getting like 4” riser meant for snowmobiles to get the job done. Whatever works I suppose. Getting the bars in a more comfortable position should help with throttle control around obsticals aswell I usually kept my phone in either my front jeans pocket, but recently got a bar bag and it usually gets stashed there now. I pretty much strictly trail and single track ride and front brake guards seem well worth it, but I’ve never been all that concerned about the rear. That being said we don’t have a ton of crazy rocky terrain in my area


Watts300

I might try out a cheaper plastic brake guard at first… since I’m not sure if my terrain choices needs it. I just ordered a pair of risers though. Thanks for your insight.


lancer786

1. I’m 6’6” and I don’t use risers. However, for the CRF250F it’s an ergonomically smaller bike. You could use risers but it could throw other things off. Like moving you back on an already small bike and causing the front end to push among other things. Hard to say. They are cheap and easy to remove so it couldn’t hurt to try it out. 2. That may be more body position and not covering the clutch. You’ll want ride in a position where there is not a lot of pressure on the handle bars and where your throttle hand is neutral when going of the rough stuff so that if you get pulled back you’re not opening the throttle. Also the unexpected can always happen so make sure you cover the clutch with 1 or 2 fingers so that even if you give it wot you won’t go anywhere. 3. I always ride with a hydration pack so I usually have the phone in there. I have an old phone I some times Mount on the bars for navigation in remote areas. You’ll want to avoid mounting new phones on a bike because the vibration will mess up the cameras. 4. I have one on the rear. I ride in the desert so it’s a must. If you’re in rocky terrain The front tire will kick up enough rocks and boulders by itself to mess up a rear disk. Maybe able to get away without one if where you ride isn’t rocky.


Watts300

1. Point taken. I think I’ll give them a try along with rolling the bar forward. (On a suggestion from another person). 2. With cars/trucks that are manual transmission, usage of the clutch is ordinarily limited to only when slowing to a stop, or resuming from one. Is the usage of a dirt bike clutch more active for speed control than in four-wheeled street vehicles? 3. A coworker told me about the camera issue. I was skeptical. Thanks for confirming. 4. Thanks. I’ll try to eventually work one into the budget.


lancer786

2. Yeah, they are wet clutches so they are used heavily to control the how and how much power makes it to the rear wheel. Good clutch control is important off road for maintaining traction and advanced techniques. Also important for keeping the bike from getting away if you whiskey throttle. Grabbing the clutch should be second nature for safety.


almightyders

I'm 6'2 and bought a crf250rx over the crf250f, I put a different renthal fatbar on that was slightly higher than the factory one. Bending my knees its the perfect height.


gtrdundave2

I would like to add, on the throttle you should have 1/4in of play or so. The throttle should have some play in it before it actually gives throttle. That little bit of play will help with hitting bumps and stuff. I keep all my stuff in my Camelback. No break guard but I don't really ride super rocky stuff. If I was gonna be in the rocks a lot I probably would


Watts300

I’m gonna have to get a backpack. I’ll double check the throttle play to be sure it’s not too tight.


gtrdundave2

Definitely a camelback or at least one that holds water. The throttle is important. To much play and you will feel like you can't get full throttle. If it's to tight every bump will you twist the throttle a little. Everybody is a little different so mess around with it and see how it goes