T O P

This the first vid i ever made of an hill climb, any suggestions to improve? I kinda have problems keeping myself exactly where i want on the track. I'm more used to streetbikes recently started doing dirtbike trails

This the first vid i ever made of an hill climb, any suggestions to improve? I kinda have problems keeping myself exactly where i want on the track. I'm more used to streetbikes recently started doing dirtbike trails

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Bag-o-chips

Hard to tell from your video what you were doing other than the camera was aimed down and I suspect you might have been watching the trail. Try to follow these rules where possible: 1) Stand and look at the horizon, not the trail directly in front of you. 2) Try to loosen up and let the bike float around underneath you as it hits bumps. 3) Watch your center of gravity. Lean forward if your going up hill. 4) Avoid the ruts when you can. 5) Maintain moment, don’t slow down. You probably don’t want to go fast if your just gaining confidence, but slowing down makes it all a lot harder. In the end don’t be hard on yourself, you made it up the trail.


Many-Ad6433

Ye the camera was a bit loose but i usually tend to look in front of me since sometimes some obstacles might be hidden by grass or plants i'll try following your suggestions


TurboAbe

All of that advice was spot on, I would add to practice slipping the clutch a bit when your back tire starts to slip. That way you keep rpms and momentum without losing traction.


Bag-o-chips

Cool, enjoy!


Many-Ad6433

Ok season start again and your suggestions helped me a lot, just i forgot number 4 and i was like "oh look a root it doesn't seem hard to use it as a ramp" *rear wheel starts spinning because root has low girp, goes too slow for a jump and when it touches again the dirt it gives all torque at once and makes me flip* (didn't get hurt) except for forgetting that it all went nice ty dude


Bag-o-chips

Awesome! Glad to hear it worked for you and you managed not to get hurt. It takes some practice to make it all second nature. Just stick with it and soon you won’t have to focus on it so much. Peace.


Many-Ad6433

It's not about managing like it was soft dirt and i was wearing all protective gear


dan_the_priest

I can't tell if you're sitting or standing, but standing helps a lot with your riding.


Many-Ad6433

Ye i was standing and squeezing the tank with my legs as a friend suggested me


dan_the_priest

So I found that a fairly relaxed stance helps with really loose stuff. I call it "drunk trials riding," which I know isn't probably the best way, but I ride my WR250R on a ton of rocks because I have no self-preservation.


Many-Ad6433

I see i might try this, behind my house there's a field filled with rocks in which i can try it


Many-Ad6433

Ok thanks this suggestion helped me a lot, the season is started again and i did a warmup ride with a friend, i have never climbed rocks and stairs so easily


dan_the_priest

Awesome, glad to hear it!


spotdishotdish

Lol that's a good way to put it


lonewanderer71

Stay firm but be ready to swing a leg out for balance if you need too


dan_the_priest

Yes, thank you for the better wording


lonewanderer71

No worries


mrbones59

Hell you made it to the top! That seems like a strong base of knowledge. Most of us probably should ask you for tips. Like I said you made it. Just keep riding. Good clip, nice climb! Happy trails.


Many-Ad6433

Ty, actually i got to the top without falling only the 3rd time i did this trail


timichi7

I don’t think you did it here but a tip from me is don’t stare at obstacles you are trying to avoid. That is a sure fire way to run straight over them. Glance, maneuver, avoid, keep your eyes moving a good 20 feet ahead of you. If you’re worried about what is under you, it’s too late… this might help keep you on your line…good climb


Many-Ad6433

Thank you for the helpful tip


L-E-K-O

Here’s the problems I noticed in this video, correcting these will dramatically improve your next attempt (which I look forward to seeing posted here soon!) 1. Throttle control: if you listen, when you first started the hill you were jumping around between the low and medium engine rpm range, keeping a smooth throttle while going up the hill helps a TON and allows for you to get a better feel for the bike. You smoothed out the engine rpm’s in the second half of the climb and the improvement showed in the video. 2. Clutch control: the two times you went off to the right of the trail seemed to happen when your rear tire slipped off to the left side of the trail when you hit some loose dirt and then once you regained traction it pushed you off to the right side. Slipping the clutch is helpful to raise your rpm’s when you bog down but if you can hit the hill without constantly messing with your clutch lever you’re better off doing that. The clutch is only for when your bike is bogging down and on that hill you should have no problem going up with minimal clutch use. 3. Speed: an important factor in any hill climb is managing your speed. If you start a hill climb going too slow then it’s going to be a struggle the entire time, but if you start quickly you can always use the hill to slow you down. When beginning a hill climb you want to give the bike consistent throttle and ideally be in the middle of your engine’s rpm range. If your rpm begins to drop then you can begin slipping the clutch out prevent from bogging down I think the key skill for you to practice here to fix all three problems noted above is slipping the clutch: When you start a hill using consistent throttle, your engine rpm will drop. To counter-act this, you need to keep a consistent throttle and slightly pull the clutch lever in until you hear your engine rpm raise. This is called “slipping the clutch”. At that point you are balancing between hearing the engine rpm and feeling the speed of the bike. Too much clutch and your engine rpm will raise but no power will go to your rear wheel and you’ll stop. Too little clutch and your rpm’s will drop to the point of stalling your bike. Both scenarios end in you being stuck halfway up a hill. The key is to know exactly how much clutch to use and the only way to know for your bike is through practice. *Important* One major problem you can encounter while slipping the clutch is if you pull the clutch too far in and then release it too quickly. Again, pulling in the clutch will increase your engine rpm and then releasing the clutch lever quickly will cause your rear tire to spin too fast and you won’t gain any traction. Or worse, you gain traction and launch the bike because you weren’t expecting that much power.


BigCountry313

Stand over the front and get up at your own pace. Keep doing em and practicing, and you’ll get better with more time on the bike! Squeeze your legs on the bike to keep control but stay relaxed too. We all start somewhere, just keep at it and you’ll get better with time!


OvenResident2988

Looks good as you get better with the clutch it will make your life way easier because you’ll stay in the optimal rpm range.


Many-Ad6433

Like by rubbing the clutch or start like clutch?


scottyaewsome

What I'm sure he means is slipping the clutch. IRC tire guy on YouTube has really great videos, look them up.


70hfun245

Would just say look as far ahead as you can your front fender shouldn't be in view when your riding


Many-Ad6433

Ye well that's also cuz the camera was a bit loose on the helmet but i too tend to look not too far when offroad, a lot of people are suggesting what you said to me so i might do so


Theferretkd

A good way to avoid small obstacles is to push down on the foot pegs, almost like leaning, instead of turning the wheel. That will help you keep your speed and control.


thisisatesti

More speed. Look where you want to go. Let the bike move around from under you, don’t fight it. It’s a weird feeling for you probably coming from street bikes. I was the opposite, I went from dirt to street/track days.


Occhrome

Not too bad. Get some more practice. Hill climbs are still a pain for me. I’ve actually been surprised at the crazy hills I climbed because I Didn’t notice how bad they were at first. I think the worst part is the bumps or rocks that you might encounter so be ready to choose a good line ahead or prepare your arms to absorb the impact


Many-Ad6433

Yea i often don't know how to take them and get too slow because i'm damn afraid of backfliping the bike


Occhrome

so backflipping or looping as others call it is a real possibility. i actually run into that more on my mountain bike when climbing steep hills, i once flipped it back and almost rolled down the side of the hill. this is really gonna depend on your terrain, dry rocky terrain i can see how that will happen. where i live its all dirt and give it too much throttle has only ever resulted in me spinning out and losing traction. just make sure to stand and put your weight forward. while also never locking your knees or elbows, being ready to soak up bumps.


Many-Ad6433

Yea where i live it's only dry rocks and plants so very high grip, only hill i know in dirt is basically outside all tracks so if you get there you get there only for that hill then back home for refueling we don't go there very often


Daddy_Tablecloth

+1 to the person who suggested going a little faster. It actually helps a lot. That being said you did pretty good and just keep riding the more you do the better you will get at it. There is a hill or more a mountain I used to go up a lot by where I grew up. Straight up too steep to ride down at certain parts. But I tried many times to make it to the top and found that I really just needed a little more speed. I was hitting the middle of the climb with engine bogging already which was the steepest part. I began getting to the midpoint in second gear then dropping into first and just heavily using the throttle to make it the rest of the way. Had to stand up and lean pretty far forward for that fucking hill / mountain Doubt Anyone cares but it was schunemunk mtn in new York. Not much of a mountain but def a large hill.


Zdzblo

You did great. Just a few bogs but you’re learning. I’m not an amazing rider but there are 2 things that always help me ride better: 1. look further ahead. 2. Look where you want to go. (Don’t look at the big rock or obstacle on the trail that you are trying to avoid. If you’re looking at it then you’ll most likely hit it. Instead, look at the path around the obstacle and that’s where you’ll naturally go.).


bentripin

outside what everyone else already mentioned (more speed, standing, relax, target fixation, feather clutch, etc) what tire pressures you running, and what tires? If your tire pressures are too high you'll get more deflections which makes it a battle to keep your lines... also a good grippy rear tire can make keeping your lines on hill climbs massively easier, especially when you also have obstacles to get over in the middle of the climb. Id start off dropping the pressures down, you'll likely find its easier to control on terrain like this.. if thats going in the right direction for your comfort level, mebe consider different tires and/or tubliss that'll really increase traction and thus confidence.


Many-Ad6433

I think my tire pressure is 1, the original owner told me to decrease it because he only got it to 1 because he had to ride it in the city to make people who wanted to buy it try it but unfortunately i didn't have the chance to decrease the pressure since my compressor is under a lot of stuff in the garage of another house


bentripin

1bar? Thats 14.5psi and way too high for trail riding.. 12psi is a good compromise pressure for speed and traction, I'm a slow rider tho who sticks to dirt so I prefer to be around 10psi w/tubes and 6-8psi w/tubliss. at street pressures every lil rock is going to have an effect on steering input, this will be amplified when the front end is light going up a hill.. at dirt pressures it'll soak those up, but its sacrificing cornering at speed performance.. Each tire/bike is a bit different, some have super hard carcasses and you can run really low pressures, some are really soft and will pinchflat if you hit a root or something at speed.. get a low pressure gauge for bikes/atvs as most auto gauges are shit at <15psi and play with it, once you realize the impact it has you'll start checking the pressures all the time to tune it for the terrain/ride.. a few psi in either direction can really change up the ride in a surprising way.


Many-Ad6433

Yea i got hards so it'd be better to lower them a bit, but like wouldn't it be better to make different pressures between the front and rear tire?


bentripin

they wont end up the same psi once you start fine tuning it, but for starting off drop em on both ends.. you can take the rear much lower than the front, which gives it more traction with a larger footprint.. if you try to take the front too low it'll pinch-flat because its got less sidewall, and since its not a powered wheel there's not great returns running it very low anyhow.. you'll be looking for a sweet spot on the front that absorbs small trail objects, and still gives you a good bounce/lift to hop over obstacles.. and on the rear I'm looking for max traction in rough terrain which is as low as I can get it for the speeds I want to go.


GLaDOSdidnothinwrong

Make sure the suspension is set for your weight. Use the chin bar on your helmet to block your view of the front fender. This week help you look further forward. More speed. Use 2nd whenever possible. I was astounded how much easier hills got when I started attacking them with more speed.


noodllezzz

If you let go of the bike with your legs and be a bit looser your bike will take more of the bumps instead of yourself that will help with balancing on it. Look farther ahead of what’s to come and not down below and just keep your momentum. Sometimes the quicker you go the less you will feel over bumpy surfaces!


Many-Ad6433

I still don't understand about the looser, like i sometimes took small jumps by staying loose with legs and i often lost my legs from the footboard, not forcefully without staying with my legs completely loose even by not holding really thight to the fuel tank but like when getting back down, doesn't it happen about the same for small rocks or its about the fact that i'm going uphill that makes harder for that to happen?


noodllezzz

You have to really find a happy medium. When your locked onto your bike you giving your body more stress with it. When you loosen up a bit and let the bike flow a bit more your gonna find it a bit easier. Look at some hard enduro videos and take a look of how they are on the bike. The top thing I’d say is just keep looking far forward it might seem difficult at first but once you start to get the hang of it you won’t be crashing into the smalls rocks and routes


Many-Ad6433

Ok i got back on it since temperatures dropped low again and it got a loooot easier thanks to this suggestion, thanks dude


LastWWolf

I've only been riding just over a year, so no expert, but its time to get used to riding that bike standing. You'll want to use a modern attack position that this video explains. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OVo89q_wrI In summary, balls of your feet on the pegs and not the crook, nice straight back with open hips, bend at your knees, and arms forward. Get used to the attack position and you'll be ripping through shit like that before you know it.


ExtraChungus1

Elbows up, stay loose, speed is key.


suzuki122rm

All about keeping your momentum up


PotBaron2

always grip the bike with your with your legs/knees makes a huge difference


Hotspur2924

Almost a cliche in the dirt biking world, but speed is your friend. Sometime easier said than done, but it is really true.


BigBergjohnson

Just go fast Going fast helps with staying alert and keeps your reflexes sharp


TLRracer

Hill climbing, as far as I can tell, is accelerating, bouncing, reacting, the odd ricochet and then face plant or mountain top!


Grandmaster_Bee

Cant see you but I can hear from your engine you need to go faster.


gdavis727

With rocks like that it’s gonna be tough to put the bike where you want it… it’s like the dry “sugar sand” as we call it here is Florida, it’s a pain to keep the bike straight…


xBlacksite

Whenever I’m going fast I am standing in an “attack position”, but usually when I climb hills I sit down. The biggest thing to think about when climbing hills is you generally want enough run up speed so if your bike dies you can almost coast to the top. Obviously with this hills length of climb you won’t be able to do that but you still want to keep your momentum up.