T O P
reality_comes

Catholic Answers youtube channel.


Captain_Kustaa

Start watching Trent Horn videos on YouTube. I am a Protestant convert and used to be very anti-Catholic. Most Protestant qualms with Catholicism are easily chocked up to misunderstanding and misinformation. A quick peep at my profile will show you I now actually spend most of my Reddit time just defending the Catholic faith... lol Good luck and Godspeed, brother. I hope you find truth in the Catholic Church like I did.


SurfingPaisan

The Thomistic Institute St. Paul center (Scott Hahn and gang) Pints With Aquinas Intellectual Conservatism The road to Emmaus


gman4734

Where do you recommend I begin? Edit: I just scrolled through Pints with Aquinas and downloaded 20 episodes. I'm excited for that!


mr-latin

He just did a rabid fire interview with Jimmy Akin of Catholic Answers, I'd recommend that one (and as much Akin as you can listen to) and use it as a jumping off point to other topics.


LittleLegoBlock

This 100%. Jimmy Akin has such a calm and collected way of explaining things, he is very charitable and very knowledgeable; his whole character just shines through his voice! You might want to check out his very unknown conversion story when he was on the Cordial Catholic Podcast (another severely underrated Catholic podcast you should check out).


gman4734

I began listening to that one tonight because of y'all's recommendation. He's a great communicator. So far, I'm still not convinced about everything, but I'm enjoying the process of learning. And I know God will lead me to the truth.


gman4734

I just downloaded that one. Thank you for your recommendation! I listened to an early one about purgatory. It's nothing like I thought it would be. What's strange to me is that I feel like the former Catholics/current Catholics I know don't know their own theology. Don't y'all learn all this in confirmation or something?


EmptySeaweed4

You’ve touched on one of the biggest issues in the Church today—horrible catechesis/faith formation that lead so many cradle Catholics to not understand the faith they’ve been blessed to be born into. There’s a reason converts and reverts who “discover” Catholic Christianity and its incredibly rich and beautiful heritage and theology seem to be much more on fire for the faith. Personally, I think it starts at home where Catholicism is often cultural and not being authentically practiced by parents. When Protestants become Catholic, it’s usually because they’ve done their (usually extensive) research and are therefore much more knowledgeable than an average cradle Catholic. I’m generalizing, but it’s what I’ve experienced and observed. I love the zeal of Protestants who come home to Holy Mother Church and love seeing it happen in person—in the past two years, two Protestants close to me have become Catholic and it’s so cool to see.


NateTheConvert

The Protestant’s Dilemma by Devin Rose https://www.amazon.com/Protestants-Dilemma-Reformations-Consequences-Catholicism/dp/1938983610 It turns your question on it’s head a bit, where the burden of proof is on Protestantism, but it was instrumental to my conversion. Thanks for being open.


AaronofAleth

Second. This book really kick started my conversion as well.


pro_rege_semper

I'm Protestant also, and I second anything from the Thomistic Institute.


Jezza000

Listen to his interview with Dr. Scott Hahn :) [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WY6zu23mRKw](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WY6zu23mRKw)


SurfingPaisan

They are all very good! all offering different things


Dinoroar97

I was also about to second pints with Aquinas!


OldFark_Oreminer

Trent Horn's podcast is full of rebuttles and good information [Counsel of Trent](https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCounselofTrent) Catholic Answers is a daily radio program. On their channel you can find full broadcasts of their program as well as programs that focus on specific topics [Catholic Answers](https://www.youtube.com/user/catholiccom/featured) Dr. David Anders has a program called Called to Communion on EWTN. The entire premise is to answer questions from those looking into the Catholic faith. You can find live and previously broadcast episodes on the EWTN YouTube channel. [Called to Communion (1/26/2022)](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2SOYjxxW_s)


Dr_Talon

I second Trent Horn and David Anders.


gman4734

I just downloaded 10 Trent Horn episodes!


Dr_Talon

Great. He has a refreshing rigor and clarity about him.


nikolispotempkin

Catholic Answers is one of the best there is especially for someone in your position. I was a Protestant for decades thinking so many untruths about the Catholic Church and then I began to actually you know study lol. My conversion is a big shock to me still 5 years later. I will pray for you to see through your previous learning and find a whole truth. Feel free to message if you have questions I've been through the whole thing


penartist

The apocrypha books are from the Septuagint. This would have been what Jesus and the apostles read as scripture, as well as what the early church used. There are many examples in New Testiment scripture that refer back to these books as well. One exampl is in Mark 12:22-24 and also Luke 20:27-40. This story of seven brothers each marrying the same woman. This originally came from the book of Tobit and is where the Pharasee in the NT scripture would have heard the story. The wedding at Canan is the first instance where a request was brought to Mary's attention and she interceded to Jesus on behalf of someone else.


DaLaohu

> The apocrypha books are from the Septuagint. This would have been what Jesus and the apostles read as scripture, as well as what the early church used. Not to mention even the first protestants, lol. The 1611 King James included the Apocrypha.


gman4734

Knowledgeable Protestants are aware that the apostles referenced the apocrypha. But we just say it was akin to referencing plays/pop culture, and that doesn't necessarily make it holy. I have to read more about that. That's way down on my list of to-dos.


jkingsbery

Peter Kreeft is another great person for this - he is a philosophy professor who converted from Protestantism (Calvinism, specifically) to Catholicism. He has his conversion story here: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VO2NGGmWBQo](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VO2NGGmWBQo) . He has a number of other videos on YouTube - he doesn't seem to have a channel, but he has several talks and interviews that have been posted by others there. He also has several books on Audible. He speaks/writes so simply and eloquently, that even when discussing deep subjects, it's pretty easy listening (or reading, if you do end up going that route). Another YouTube channel worth looking at is The Coming Home Network. The channel's organizer, Marcus Grodi, is a former Protestant clergyman who converted to Catholicism, interviewing people on their conversion stories (many from a Protestant background, but from others too).


Limoncello1447

Second The Journey Home with Marcus Grodi on youtube.


gman4734

I emailed a local priest today who recommended that and I looked into it but haven't listened to an episode yet.


cathgirl379

**Called to Communion** \- A Catholic Q&A podcast. Dr. David Anders was a Presbyterian and did his studies on Calvin and Luther... which eventually made him become Catholic. **Catholic Answers Live** \- another Q&A podcast. this one occasionally has "themed" shows and switches up who's answering the questions. When it comes to books/audiobooks you might look into "Why We're Catholic", "The Bible is a Catholic Book"


Allegiance_to_Mhysa

Bishop Robert Barron's Word on Fire podcast. Also, his series (or book) titled *Catholicism*. I grew up Evangelical and became Catholic in 2019. I saw the *Catholicism* program on PBS a few years before and between that and exploring the Catholic tradition via RCIA, I learned so much about things I didn't know or misunderstood.


betterthanamaster

Better be careful…the Catholic side of Christianity is the pathway to many opinions some consider to be…unnatural. Seriously though, you’re going to start getting answers, realize they make sense, and you might find yourself becoming Catholic before you realize it. So I hope to see you next Easter!


gman4734

Haha I haven't found many things I really disagree with yet. Bummer too because I want to continue using birth control.


betterthanamaster

What if I told you we have something better than artificial birth control?


gman4734

I'll bite. What are you talking about?


betterthanamaster

Creighton Model NFP. Works great. It requires some responsibility to use it properly (and not sinfully - it’s not a contraceptive, but using it as if it were would be sinful. That’s a whole other can of worms, though). There are some serious drawbacks to virtually all forms of artificial contraceptives, whether they’re an inconvenience (like a condom) or downright dangerous (IUD) but the single “drawback,” if you can call it that, of NFP is you can’t have sex anytime you want if you’re trying to avoid pregnancy. That’s like…3-5 days a month for most women. During those days, it can be tricky, but I’ve found it makes things all that much sweeter. Honesty, I’m surprised NFP isn’t used by everyone. Success rates are much higher on average than every other method out there, even the pill, and that’s not just some bogus statement. There’s actual research and it’s been around for decades. Look into it and you might be surprised how artificial birth control starts to look like that thing you did in college that makes you cringe.


NateTheConvert

Mind opening that can of worms? What’s a licit use of NFP to prevent pregnancy so as to not be sinful? And vice versa…


betterthanamaster

It’s kind of based on a family’s position, so it’s fluid, but there are good reasons why a family may want to space children. Health of the mom or dad, significant stress, loss of a job or serious financial trouble, and even just so you’re not buried under a mountain of kids. But every couple needs to ask “do we have a good reason to try to avoid?” If the answer is no, there isn’t much moral difference between using NFP and artificial means and both would be sinful. This isn’t to say that every time a couple has sex they have to think this way and it certainly doesn’t mean every time they should try for a baby. But it does mean that every time you engage in sexual activity, you’re open to the transmission of life. NFP is the only method out there that remains open to the possibility, even if that possibility is close to 0 by abstaining.


_Kyrie_eleison_

Whenever someone asks me to "describe catholicism" I tell them to start with this video: https://youtu.be/tm08x8YiuXk "Why We're Catholic" is a great introduction but very beginner level. Catholic Answers puts their daily, two hour live show up as a podcast. That's a good start as well. The author of the book I mentioned also has his own podcast. His name is Trent Horn (he also works for Catholic Answers). Another podcast is Pints With Aquinas. There's a lot more as well but it seems like I already gave you years of research!


dusky-jewel

The apocrypha? You mean the books that some protestants chopped out of the Bible over 1000 years after the canon had been settled?


gman4734

There's two sides to every coin.


dusky-jewel

Sure. In this case those two sides are "the truth" and "not the truth."


RafaCasta

Not with this coin. The Deuterocanon (apocrypha is another thing) was already part of Scripture in the times of Jesus and was in the Christian canon since the the beginning.


KnotUndone

The United States Catechism for Adults is available as an audiobook. Enjoy the journey!


gman4734

I'm glad you brought this up, because I have a follow-up question about the catechism. Excuse my ignorance, but I understand the catechism to be a sort of formalized list of interpretations of scripture and church traditions. And it seems like it has inerrancy. Is it possible for a Catholic to *disagree* with part of the catechism? Say, for example, if they believe there should be female priests or that people should be able to use birth control? As a protestant, I can just say "I interpret scripture differently" and disagree with a myriad of topics because my church's written beliefs aren't necessarily inerrant. It seems like there's less freedom in catholicism to agree/disagree with the church's interpretations. That'd be kinda a deal breaker for me because I don't think I'd ever believe in a literal Garden of Eden.


KnotUndone

You're going to get some great indepth answers to this question but not from me. I'm no apologist. I am a recent convert. I sat down and read the Catechism because I had so many questions like you. I can only tell you that after reading with an open, prayerful heart I came to realize that I was asking the wrong questions. The freedom of Catholicism is the truth. Not your truth. Not my truth. The truth. I expected a book of rules in the Catechism but I found a love letter from God. (And fundamental literalism is the antithesis of a Catholic understanding of scripture and creation.) I will pray for you.


gman4734

Thank you for your prayers. And for not judging me.


Basi-Basi

I think the important point here is the classical definition of truth as *the conforming of the intellect to the thing*. “The Church alone”, scripture bearing witness (1Tim 3:15), “possesses the charisma of truth” (St Ignatius of Antioch, ~110 AD). There cannot be many truths, but only one truth. If the intellect conforms itself to the object, it will never say the clear sky is red, nor would that, obviously, be desirable - nor would considering that reasonable be commendable. It all boils down to (intellectual, emotional and spiritual) maturity: “I don’t decide the truth”.


gman4734

This comes across as judgmental. You're implying that I choose my own truths rather than obeying God. But, in reality, wrestling with scripture is very healthy. I didn't choose to believe in a non-literal Eden. I came to that conclusion after years of prayer and study. I believe that's the truth. Not *my* truth, but *the* truth. IDK, maybe this is a just core difference between Protestants and Catholics. Regularly studying scripture and debating it is a core part of my faith, and I believe I'm better for it. I wouldn't want to be given a list of mandatory interpretations for non-dogmatic issues.


Basi-Basi

I didn’t mean to come across as judgmental - I don’t know you, and hence I have nothing to judge, and I beg your pardon if I did come across that way. But I do have a very, very long history with friends who were Protestants, all people I genuinely cared for (including my girlfriend for many, many years). That’s the intellectual passage that Protestants generally need to make. But at the end of the day what it all comes down to is probability: since I believe there are many Protestants who are intelligent and learned, I could just gather a dozen of them and ask them to interpret any single passage and their answers will all *necessarily* differ, even just slightly. In fact, this is not at all an hypothetical, considering of all my friends who I hold in higher regard one is a Swedish Lutheran and another is a Calvinist. The fact that it’s virtually impossible to find any two Protestants who have the same beliefs I think is sufficient evidence that no matter how reasonable and well researched human opinion will never suffice. If it did, Our Lord wouldn’t have given us Scripture in the first place. In fact I think there must be a reason Our Lord gave us the Church before through the Church He gave us the Bible. That’s a necessary relationship of logical consequentiality - which Protestants obviously can’t abide by, and that’s the reason why it is as *necessary* that their opinions will inevitably differ. And it’s within this problematic relationship with the Truth that the Church’s assistance is an incredibly great grace, one which we should not perceive as a burden, but rather as an immense gift! I know this is a very complex topic, so don’t worry if we don’t see eye to eye on everything - if you think that conversation can be helpful, feel free to DM me!


DaLaohu

I read more than I listen to stuff, so I don't have anything there. But I do want to recommend to focus on learning about Mariology, and the Early Church. The two killshots to my protestant beliefs were first finding out that Catholics do not worship Mary, and then later finding out that the first Christians believed in transubstantiation and had worship services much like Catholic Mass.


kidfromCLE

*Born Fundamentalist Born Again Catholic* by David B. Currie *Rome Sweet Home* by Scott Hahn


gman4734

I'm looking for something specific about theological qualms. Do these discuss that? Because I am not necessarily looking for a testimony. Thank you for the recommendations!


kidfromCLE

I just went and pulled my copies of each off the bookshelf and gave them a look. Both contain a mix of testimony and theology. Currie’s *Born Fundamentalist Born Again Catholic* is heavier on the theology. His story is much like mine in that he went from topic to topic learning about each, deciding that he agreed with the Catholic way of doing things (or that he at least had no good reason to disagree with the Catholic way of doing things) and then moving onto the next. The chapters are similarly organized, with titles like “Communion and the Real Presence,” “Scriptural Authority,” “The Bible,” “Salvation,” “Mary,” etc. I would say this is more theology heavy. It changed my life. I think it’s exactly what you’re looking for. Hahn’s *Rome Sweet Home* is probably more testimony. It does include both Scott and his wife Kimberly’s theological struggles with leaving Protestantism and entering the Catholic Church, but I’d call it 65% testimony-35% theology based on my recollection from years ago. It’s a short, enjoyable read though, and worth your time. If you’re looking for just straight theology, *St. Joseph’s New Baltimore Catechism* would be good. It comes in several editions to be used by readers of different ages. I think there are 3. #1 is for kids, #2 is for teens, and #3 is for young adults. *Catholicism for Dummies* is also excellent, believe it or not. I promise I’m not calling you a dummy! We actually used it at one of my former parishes as the RCIA textbook. *The Catechism of the Catholic Church* is also an amazing resource as well. You can access it for free online [here,](https://www.usccb.org/sites/default/files/flipbooks/catechism/) but it’s also available in book form. God bless you in your journey for the Truth. If I can ever help in any way, please message me. I will add you to my prayer list.


MelmothTheBee

> priests needing to be unmarried, I’ll touch on this just to - hopefully - push your curiosity. The Catholic Church doesn’t need priests to be unmarried. As a matter of fact, there are many priests that are happily married, with kids. I received communion from one just today at daily mass. Yep, they’re in full communion with the Church, and the pope. Celibacy started 1,000 years after the Church started. In addition to the various spiritual reasons you’ll find for the idea behind priests’ celibacy, there’s another reason we don’t remind people of often enough. We don’t want multi-generational families of priests to be in charge. This is to avoid Joel Oesten types, even at a small local level, or to prevent abuse of Church’s resources. If they don’t have kids, they don’t have anyone they can transfer money and power to, as small or big as such things are (never underestimate power at local level). Will this prevent all abuse? Absolutely not. A priest can still secretly buy a Lamborghini for himself, but he won’t be able to transfer its value, or the power of his office, to anyone.


Dial_Up_Sound

My priest is married. Kids are grown and out. He just retired from a large corporation as a Project Manager. Eastern Rites do their own thing.


gman4734

Wait, is there, like, a disagreement on this? I thought this was a requirement. Is celibacy just something that some priests just choose to do? I'm very curious about this. Your argument is way better than the more typical ones I've heard. I still don't like the idea of requiring celibacy (wasn't Peter married?) but it's something I'll ponder.


Basi-Basi

Outsiders find this hard to understand at first but it is so to speak a way of really coming to grasp the Church’s beauty. When people think about Catholics they think about the Latin Church, not the Catholic Church. When I say “the Latin Church” I mean the particular church that comprises the vast majority of Catholics who live in what we’d call “the West” in a broader sense (Western Europe, America, Oceania, most of Africa). Nonetheless there are millions and millions of Catholics, who are in communion with Rome and believe the same thing as the Latins, but belong to one of the 23 eastern Churches (not to be confused with the Eastern Orthodox!). They mostly speak Greek (but also many other languages such as Syriac, which descends from the tongue Our Lord spoke!) and as I said believe all the same things as us, but are not bound to disciplines (such as priestly celibacy) that are peculiar to the Latin Church. Priestly celibacy is, as I said, a discipline - it’s not dogma. Let’s say it’s an administrative rule, which, hypothetically, could be reversed in the future and imply no contradiction with previous teaching. Eastern Catholics, in regards to fasting and many other things, have disciplines Latins aren’t bound to, as well! But is it desirable that priestly celibacy should be done away with? As a brief perusal of Scripture will tell you in no unclear terms (1Cor 7:8,32-38), the answer is no.


gman4734

Interesting. I hadn't thought about the Catholic church being so divided. Are there different popes then? And different catechisms?


MelmothTheBee

u/Basi-Basi explained it very well. In addition to what he said, in the West the priests in the Ordinariate can be married. However be careful. The Church is not divided, it simply recognizes different charisms on top of pastoral and administrative needs. The basic doctrine, the dogmas, and the bottom line is identical everywhere. However we reconize cultural, historical, and societal needs that make the **expression** of such identical core somewhat different. I can say the word “House” in different languages (“Casa”, “Haus” etc) or with different methods (a written word, a picture, a spoken word, a 3D model etc). There is only one pope, but here again be careful. The pope is not a magical dude that gains superpowers. The pope is the earthly head of the Church because he’s the Bishop of Rome. It simply means that through his office he has administrative jurisdiction over the whole Church. We say that the pope is infallible, but that doesn’t mean that if he says that there are two moons then we have to believe that. What we mean is that because of the jurisdiction described above, **and only through his office**, he might at times (very rarely) clarify **doctrinal** statements. In other words we believe that is Truth itself being infallible, and that sometimes (again, rarely) the pope’s office can clarify such Truth whenever there’s some confusion. I guess what I am trying to say is that there is much more to discover, and that things were made for very specific, deep reasons, through 2000 years of our history.


Basi-Basi

As I said, no. The Bishop of Rome has jurisdiction over all 24 churches. Furthermore, “divided” is absolutely not the right word. As, to quote Our Lord, no father would give his children stones or snakes when they ask for food, so Holy Mother Church allows all her children to worship God according to the mores of their ancestors - the Latins according to the Latin custom, the Byzantines according to the Byzantine custom, and so on. In fact, the Eastern Catholics’ loyalty to the Pope (in Poland, Russia, Ukraine...) led to many of them being martyred throughout the centuries (by the Tsar first, the communists later). To quote St Thomas Aquinas, “unity is not mutually exclusive with multiplicity, but with division”. There’s One Church, and behold how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity.


Basi-Basi

I uploaded [this](https://postimg.cc/gxFFXr19) very useful little diagram.


MelmothTheBee

Wow, beautiful diagram!!


Basi-Basi

That channel has loads of good stuff - check them out on telegram and YouTube.


RosalieThornehill

Look for audiobooks by Scott Hahn and Brant Pitre. :)


[deleted]

I would recommend checking out the [Ascension Presents](https://www.youtube.com/c/AscensionPresents) and [Bishop Robert Barron](https://www.youtube.com/user/wordonfirevideo) YouTube Channels as well as Bishop Barron's [Catholicism Series](https://catholicismseries.com/watch). I'll even link you to a couple of their videos that discuss the qualms you mention: [What You Should Know About Purgatory](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GnwDDsN6ZfM) [Do Catholics Worship Saints?](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K9yGNPaIcA) [Why Catholics Call Mary Their Mother](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGRGv9_60iI) [Bishop Barron on Priestly Celibacy](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_PbPJ9jeh4) I will also link you to some other great videos from these channels: [Bishop Barron on Scientism and God's Existence](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZkHv8iTJPo) [Bishop Barron on Protestantism and Authority](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWYwBDqFsuE) [Why Be Catholic and Not Just Christian?](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJCbCs-y1_k) [Homosexuality, Gay Marriage, and Holiness](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLrRfwpvERU) [Bruce Jenner & the Transgender Question](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-9_rxXFu9I) I hope you find these videos helpful!


Dial_Up_Sound

Rod Bennett is probably one of the most under-appreciated. Four Witnesses Scripture Wars The Apostacy that Wasn't ...all of these are excellent introductions to the early church.


123Foodforthought

The Cordial Catholic podcast is perfect for you. A Prodestant convert to Catholicism discusses these very questions with Catholic authers, historians, and theologians.


gman4734

This is exactly what I was looking for. Crazy that I had to scroll so far down to find this. Thank you! I went through it and downloaded about 20 episodes.


123Foodforthought

It's a great podcast that has helped strengthen my faith as well.


gman4734

I listened to the first episode today. It is exactly what I'm looking for. I have a lot to think about now.


Dingomeetsbaby594

These comments pretty much covered everything I was going to say. However, I’ll also throw into the mix my own podcast. “Cutting The Gordian Knot “ Go through the three part episode on the Eucharist! I cover 13 passages in the Old Testament, three passages in the New Testament, philosophy of transubstantiation, early church fathers, Jewish tradition, and a ton of common objections. If you go to my website https://www.thegordianknot.org you will find the article that it’s based on. At the end of that article is a debate with a protestant philosophy and theology professor. If you want an in-depth, fast paced, and Bible-based Explanation of this core Catholic doctrine. That would be a really good start. There’s also a an extensive scriptural tour of Marian Doctrines and purgatory on the podcast. Let me know if you have any questions, objections, or comments and I’ll answer them on air. Just email [email protected]


EmptySeaweed4

OP, add to your list St. John Henry Newman’s “Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine.” Newman was a prominent Protestant theologian who converted to the Catholic Church. He started writing this essay an Anglican and finished as a Catholic. You mentioned you prefer audio, so here it is read on YouTube: Part 1: https://youtu.be/ja7gGOxZbJI Part 2: https://youtu.be/1WL1u8ZAwBM I cannot recommend this enough.


[deleted]

Andrew Klavan show has some pretty deep shite in between the satire and politics. It’s a good laugh.


icequeen1016

Rome sweet home is a great book that is about 2 married adult converts. They were raised Protestant and it addresses a lot of those ideas you brought up. It’s also a quick and easily digested read which is nice sometimes


gman4734

Is it more about theology and addressing objections to the church, or is it more about Scott Hahn's conversion story?


icequeen1016

He talks about his story but he also uses the Bible and theology to grapple with his questions about Catholicism. My husband read it to help him decide if he wanted to convert.


gman4734

I listened to Scott Hahn's conversion story on YouTube and it was amazing. Thank you!


RafaCasta

*The Lamb's Supper* by Scott Hahn is more about theology.


No_Yogurt_4602

The Fr. Mike Schmitz Catholic Podcast on Spotify is really good! He also did a Bible in a Year podcast series that was super informative.


AaronofAleth

The Cordial Catholic podcast sounds like it would be perfect for you. Keith is an evangelical convert and hosts very thoughtful but entry level interviews every week.