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11theman

It entirely depends on what the car is, there’s no generic answer to this question. 100k on a PD130? Yes. 100k on a 13B? no.


two4one_memes

What about mk7 golf?


11theman

Again that would depend on the trim and also the service history. If you have identified a car you want I would look at the specific forums for it and do some reading, work out what people are saying about the reliability, weak points and what will often need doing.


Hayche

I brought a MK 6 golf at 175k mileage 4 years ago had a lot of motorway miles, cambelt needed doing but generally runs pretty well family still use it as a spare car. I think it all depends on the type of driving the cars done to be fair.


tycoon282

Hello from the pd130 club 😆


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11theman

42,367 miles mate.


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11theman

Not at all, I just magically know the age, engine, service history and use history of the Mazda you’re after and happen to know they blow up at 42,368 miles like clockwork.


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11theman

Tbh I dunno mate. That sounds like good mileage for the age. If it has full service history and the major bits have all been done with an MOT history that doesn’t concern you I would say buy the car if you want to own it. Also consider: will you be happy driving that?


BigRigs63

There is a sweet spot at that 100k-120k mark, where for modern cars it isn't a fuckload of miles, but the price falls off a cliff after 100k in this country. Means you can get some decent deals. But it also depends on the car. I'd love another ST170, but I wouldn't get a near 200k mile one like I did with my Corolla. At some point of miles, it gets to the stage of it not really being worth it. A 200k vs 300k mileage car isn't a huge significant difference in price for example, for a lot more miles.


KEEPCARLM

Depends on your use for the car too though, if you're doing 5k a year buying a bargain withi 100k miles is probably fine but if your banging on 20k a year that car is probably too close to its end life


Biggestbollox

If it’s been a company car that’s sat on the motorway all day then high mileage can often mean it’s cheaper to buy. If it’s been a high mileage taxi avoid avoid. Check the back seats and rear doors. If the rear has hardly been used go for it. If the rear seats and doors are worn avoid avoid.


two4one_memes

The back seat check sounds like a good way to check the usage, never thought of that


ToffeeMunchAndCrunch

It's more to tell you if it's a taxi or not.


[deleted]

Another good tip is to get a higher spec model. Taxi drivers normally go for the more basic trim levels so if you look at higher spec ones you’re less likely to find a taxi


SNDRoberts

Great advice. This is what I tell people.


Pitiful-Wrongdoer692

Bought my 2016 mondeo last October at 105k 2.0 tdci 180bhp....I do the same as the original owner....just sit on motorways 90% of the time, it's about to roll over to 130k...


i-was-voluntold

I’m curious how much you paid for that 1 year ago? Wonder how much the used marked prices have increased


Pitiful-Wrongdoer692

Mine is same spec as this, but a year newer https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2015-15-FORD-MONDEO-2-0-TDCI-180-ST-LINE-TITANIUM-X-SPORT-TURBO-DIESEL-PAN-ROOF-/114939982249?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l49286&mkrid=710-127635-2958-0 And in a pearlescent white....Paid 9k....


i-was-voluntold

Cheers, £2500 + price increase for an older car, Jesus


BeardedBaldMan

For a well looked after land cruiser I would consider buying up to about 225K miles. If it was a decently large engined Lexus or similar and it was high yearly miles (25-35K) I'd be happy buying at 125K miles with a decent service history. Really I'm looking for cars where the engine has been relatively unstressed and ideally a lot of motorway miles I'd be wanting to put another 50-75K miles on before getting rid of it


ToffeeMunchAndCrunch

A mate of mine's dad has owned a Land Cruiser Colardo since new, around 2000 or something. The thing has 200k odd miles and a couple months ago one of the brake calipers kinda just fell off.


xcoatsyx

What about in general? Let’s say your typical petrol family hatchback?


[deleted]

Take the age of the car, multiple it by an average mileage for the type of car you’re looking at. Inherently that’s the normal amount of mileage that you’d expect on a car - the amount that using it for its intended purpose would put on it. Average for UK drivers is 8-10k I believe. Small city cars will be down closer to 5-6, larger saloons can easily do 15-20k a year. When you realise a lot of people are looking at 10+ year old cars, the totals are much higher than most people find acceptable. You have to ask yourself why and consider if our expectations need adjusting, especially the blind spot we have for 6 figure mileages.


BeardedBaldMan

Depends how well specified it was, condition etc. Say for example it was a low spec Ford Focus petrol. I wouldn't bother buying it over 80K miles as I wouldn't feel it was worth the investment. A top spec model with good options and a larger engine I'd buy up to 115K miles But this is based on be doing 15K miles a year. If I was doing 7K I'd be more relaxed about mileage


xcoatsyx

I guess an example would be a Mark 6 VW Golf, decent spec ie match or SE/GT.


BeardedBaldMan

If it was the 2l diesel yes, if it was one of the fragile petrol variants no


xcoatsyx

I thought the 1.4 TSI with chain was OK at 122 HP? I think the 1.4 158HP is a lot more notorious? Aren’t there likely to be other engine issues with the diesel?


two4one_memes

Wow that is alot of miles but If taking good care of its justifiable but you can never garentee that is has been looked after


BeardedBaldMan

You can be reasonably confident with a good service history and a thorough inspection.


[deleted]

Exactly. A 125k with good history is going to be a better buy than a knackered badly looked after 60k miler. A badly looked after 125k car will also be really obvious to spot so easy to avoid. So yes you can never guarantee but aiming for low mileage doesn’t change that risk - it just means you pay more so have less left over to fix it!


ImperialYell

I picked up my 3.0 TD Prado earlier this year with 248k km on which is about 150k miles barely run it yet!!.


Samborak

I can see lots of people recommend trying to pick up a car with higher mileage where that has largely been motorway miles. How do you find whether the miles were likely to have been cruising motorway miles as opposed to stop start urban journeys though? What would be signs to look for indicating the former?


bemusedmoose

I think a good sign is a lot of miles in a short period of time, say over 10k a year, would indicate motorway miles. It's hard to do that sort mileage anywhere else... normally!


[deleted]

By definition it’s hard to do a lot of miles on a city. Even if someone did a 2 hour commute EACH WAY in a city at 15mph average, every working day of a year you’d still only rack up 12k miles. 15mph average is probably optimistic for a city commute and obviously 4 hours spent commuting is pretty unrealistic. You’ve got to be spending most of your day driving to do mainly urban miles and still put a lot of miles on a car. The harder thing to spot is the opposite - a lower mileage car that’s spent it’s time on motorways. A car that’s spent 100k doing town miles will have probably been running for 3-4 times as long as one that’s done it on motorway miles. It’s probably done a similar number more individual journeys. So the seats have had 4 times more of a beating from sweaty arses, the seatbelts have been retracted and extended a lot more, doors opened and closed a lot more. Bored fingers prodding buttons more etc etc. All of this is quite noticeable stuff - slow seatbelts, creaky doors, saggy seat bolsters, faded buttons etc. All this can happen on low mileage cars and is a good indicator that the cars actually had more use and more engine time than a higher mileage one. Finally, look closely at the paint. No car is perfect so there will be the odd mark and chip on it. Driving on motorways inevitably picks up a few stone chips - if there’s a few of those on the front of the bonnet then it’s probably a sign it’s spent time on the motorway. Good sign especially if they’ve been touched in. If it’s got more little dings on the side of the door and kerbed alloys then it’s probably spent more time around town. Oh one other tip - especially for lower value cars, buying privately means you can ask the owner how they use it. It’s quite a normal thing to casually bring up in conversation and most people think “oh I just pootle around town in it” is a positive so they’re unlikely to lie. Dealers don’t add much value at the lower end of the market really


Entertainnosis

The easiest ones to spot are collapsed/worn seat bolsters, worn steering wheels, worn gear knobs, worn brake pedals specifically, along with parking scratches/dents. I recall seeing an older Golf for sale on eBay a few years ago now, car had done 375,000 miles commuting from Bath to London and it looked damn near immaculate on the inside. Virtually no wear whatsoever, and it looked far nicer than some of the 120,000 mile examples that had lived most of their lives in London.


MettySwinge

If it's serviced, it doesn't bother me. Bought a car at 130k and was faultless. I also bought a car at 30k and it was fucked.


SNDRoberts

I think a few people have said they aren’t bothered really as long as it had good service history and up to date etc. that’s all I care about. Mileage doesn’t bother me. I recently bought a 2017 Passat estate GT 132,000 miles with 1 owner. It was a lease car so had a lot of good paper work with the car and cambelt was changed at 130,000. Bargain for 9K.


404merrinessnotfound

100k most of the time unless it's a car I really want at a reasonable price e.g. Alfa GT at £750 with 155k miles


whynoblank

I paid £1k for my GT with 124k miles. I always buy on condition rather than mileage. I once ran a Audi S4 from 177k to 208k with no real dramas.


404merrinessnotfound

Good finds right there!


Stringsandattractors

Personally I look under 50k.. I like interiors that feel new. But it depends really. I’d go higher if something was tidy, lower mileage just makes the search a bit easier.


toomanychick3ns

Highest I've ever gone is around 170k for a one year stopgap car. Sold a very well maintained transit camper to a friend with 230k a few years back and its still kicking butt In daily use.


macnerd93

Depends on the car. My 1999 Defender just past 142k but the entire thing was rebuilt about ten years ago, so it still feels pretty decent. The 300 TDI are good for hundreds of thousands of miles


roryb93

Depends what you’re doing with it, I suppose. Our family car was a 3 year old Kuga @ 39k and we’ve done 20k over 3 years. Same with the Leon we’re getting. Our runaround car for a 20 mile round trip was at 75k on a 11 year old Ka and cost £2k


RedBlockB230ft

Well Irv Gordon's p1800 is over 3 million and I would buy that if I could so...


Grenzie

£750 for Corolla 05, 1.4 petrol, 120k miles. Costs me nothing but rubber and gas, with a yearly local garage service. It’s my daily and gets abused.