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Is Ausbildung in Germany completely free and the job after finishing studying is guaranteed ?

Is Ausbildung in Germany completely free and the job after finishing studying is guaranteed ?

mkugelfisch

Please have a look at the wiki on r/Germany, it explains Ausbildung among kany other things. Do you know German? Are you an EU citizen? If the answer is no, you won't do any Ausbildung until you know German pretty well and if you are a non EU citizen your choices are limited to jobs that are extremely unpopular among Germans and Europeans, meaning basically nursing.


chilldude696996

So nursing is my only option?


mkugelfisch

You are unlikely to get a visa for anything else. Not impossible, but unlikely.


chilldude696996

Any other option except nursing ?? Any other profession ? I want to choose not be forced :(


mkugelfisch

As a non EU citizen, without having any skills or degrees that are recognized in Germany you unfortuntely don't have the luxury to choose. You may get a offer to do an Ausbildung, but in order to get a visa for that you need to pass the labour test and that comes down to your employer showing that they couldn't find a German or EU citizen or legal resident in Germany to do the job. That is difficult enough for unpopular positions like chefs or bakers, but not impossible in some places (or so I read) out in the sticks where nobody young wants to live. But since chances are high that your visa would not be granted, lots (if not most) employers won't even bother with an offer for you. Nursing is the only Ausbildung with good to very good chances to actually get the visa.


burner8020

Well… it’s f you want to be able to chose, you need to bring some qualifications. Ausbildung is school and job at the same time, roughly 40/60% of your time. The school for the Ausbildung is German only, the jobs you will work in is most likely German, too, even if it’s an international job. If you cannot communicate with your colleagues or understand company communication in German, you’re not really qualified for the employer. Once you have a good level of German, there are really many trades to chose from where you can make an Ausbildung, more than 340 different jobs in all kinds of markts; from traditional retail, office, mechanical, manual trades, via electronics, food, hospitality, hotel, transport, human- and childcare up to more specialized like arts, medicine, classical crafts and even public sector or governmental clerks. All the best!


chilldude696996

Yeah thank you but he said above that all the 340 jobs i won't get any unless its nursing .. because its low demand... Another question can i apply for more than 1 Ausbildung profession?


ElizaaA_DoolittlE

You can apply for as many as you want, they are not connected, it is similar to applying for a regular job


burner8020

Go to google and familiarize yourself with the German Ausbildung-System, e.g. [here](https://kcrconsultants.com/ausbildung/). Yes, you can apply for many different jobs, but obviously only sign for one. You do this at companies. This means: whatever job you want to chose for your Ausbildung, you will need to find a company/employer, that will be your Ausbildungsbetrieb (company). If your German is good, there are many out there - NOT only nursing. This Ausbildungsbetrieb will register you with the respective school and for your specific job your chose.


thewindinthewillows

OP's issue is not finding the position, but getting a visa. For that one, the employer has to prove that they couldn't find any German or EU citizen to hire. And that leaves them with only fields or locations where no one else wants to train.


burner8020

I understand the issue. However, there are thousands of Ausbildungsstellen left open in non-nursing jobs each year, where the employer could easily explain that he didn’t find any or no matching candidates apart from OP - also in attractive occupations.


chilldude696996

What are those attractive occupations please? Some exemples please?


JASN_DE

No, there is no guarantee. It's also a paid (not very well, but still) job. How's your German? Where are you from?


Don_Hoomer

its not allways paid, but most of them are


derwookie

I just know one job, where you don't get money while in Ausbildung and that's Physiotherapeut instead of getting money you spend money for that... It's weird


_SummerChild_

Also dance teacher


derwookie

Is that an apprenticeship at all?


_SummerChild_

Depends. For some you "just" have to do some training and tests to get a certificate. But my friend for example went three years to a school to learn different styles of dance (ballet, hip hop, etc) and they also had some classes in economics so you are prepared to run your own school. That's a different kind of Ausbildung as you pay a school to teach you (same as logopedia) and not being payed by a company to learn.


SorryIAmNew2002

Same for Kindergärtner


Luzi1

And Ergotherapeuten


derwookie

Not where I live


kumanosuke

"Kindergärtner" isn't something that exists. It's called Kinderpfleger or Erzieher.


Future-Reveal-3770

Kindergärtnerin absolutely DID exist, and there are probably still some elderly ones around that did their Aubildung pre-1967, when it was called that way.


binned_alaska

Ausbildung is just a traineeship that has some legal framework around it in Germany. So basically you are employed as a trainee who earns a small wage and in exchange for earning little money gets training by the employer plus goes to school two days a week (or sometimes they do it in blocks, you work three months and then go to school for a month or whatever). It is VERY little money though. Usually not enough to live on, so most people doing an Ausbildung still live with their parents during it. And no, the job is not guaranteed. Though lots of employers decide to keep you on as a regular employee after your Ausbildung. Because obviously they can't do any better than having an employee who they trained themselves and have known for years. But there are no guarantees and especially small companies simply can't afford to keep on every trainee after they finished their Ausbildung. Mind that you don't apply for an Ausbildung in a centralised and merit based system like you do for university. But you apply directly to your future employer who decides about employing you the same way they decide about employing any regular employee. So basically, if you're abroad and not available to show up for an interview in person, your chances are extremely low unless your future employer is absolutely desperate because they can't find anyone within Germany to fill the position.


chilldude696996

Hmm so what are the desperate jobs .. i only heard nursing that has high chance


Simbertold

Apparently a lot of classic trades like butchers or bakers, especially outside of the cities, also have problems finding apprentices. But without good German skills, it will be very hard to find one that wants you in any profession.


chilldude696996

Of course i'll learn the language


Simbertold

But you haven't learned the language yet. Which means, that at this point, you are an uneducated worker who doesn't speak German. I don't want to be harsh by saying this, but this is something you need to realize. You currently don't really have a lot of selling points going for you that would make it attractive for Germany to have you immigrate, or for any German employer to hire you. This does not mean to demean or devalue you as a human being in any way.


maryfamilyresearch

You cannot do this after arrival in Germany, in case this is your plan. You need B2 level German before you start. For reference, German students tend to be at around B1 level English after 5+ years of lessons in school, 2-3 times of 45 min a week.


crossrite

hospitality is also a possible, had many apprentices from foreign countries.


binned_alaska

I'm not an expert, but yeah, it's pretty much nursing and probably some manual labour type jobs that aren't that well paid and most German young people would rather not do hard work for little money if they have a shot at something else.


xDeesz

How are your German skills and are you from the EU or not?


Don_Hoomer

short: no to both most traineeships are free and you get paid but not all, some costs you miney while you work for free... also after the traineeship it depends on the job and how good you have been at it. when your boss doesnt likes you you wont stay at that company but as i said it depends widly


chilldude696996

So if i finish the traineeship and not get the job.. ill get deported back to my country? :(


TheAerouge

You have a grace period of ~3months (iirc) where you can apply for a job elsewhere but yes ... if you dont find a job after finishing the training you arent allowed to stay.


Don_Hoomer

i dont know how much time you have to get a new job after finishing the traineeship, but if you want a job afterwards it doesnt take much time also if you are good in at the job you mist likly will get the job afterwards,too


Aeryaa

Most likely you get the job afterwards


godless-life

That's not true at all.


Future-Reveal-3770

Stop bullshitting, the Übernahmequote nationwide is 71%, so most likely is a good description for 3/4. [https://www.google.com/search?q=%C3%BCbernahmequote+auszubildende](https://www.google.com/search?q=%C3%BCbernahmequote+auszubildende&rlz=1C1CHBF_deDE910DE910&oq=%C3%BCbernahmequote+aus&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0i512l2j0i22i30l3.3577j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8)


godless-life

That's the federal average and doesn't tell you anything, really. If you want to accuse someone of bullshitting, please fact check properly instead of using the next best google hit. https://www.bibb.de/dokumente/pdf/bibb_datenreport_2020.pdf That's the report you need to check in order to support your claim (or, well, not). Here are some highlights: * Foreigners are mostly found in industries with lower probability of being accepted into employment (table A5.2-4 ff.) * 35% of foreigners drop out before finishing (as opposed to 25% of Germans) * 16% of foreigners fail the final exam (vs. 6.7% Germans) So if you take that into consideration, you'll find that OP's chances are statically way below the average (that naturally doesn't even consider the dropout & failure rate).


Bishamee

There are only two things guaranteed in life: death and taxes


Idualc_

You should read this https://www.make-it-in-germany.com/en/visa/kinds-of-visa/training


Dev_Sniper

1. you get paid for it since you‘re working at the company when you‘re not in school. 2. no the job isn‘t guaranteed and some companies just take on „Azubis“ to avoid paying a fine but most companies try to get new employees so in most jobs you should be able to either get a job at the company you worked for or you should be able to get a job soon after graduating. Although you‘ll obviously need to be a good / okay student & your work ethic / skill / … should be okay (or better) as well. If you barely managed to finish the Ausbildung and annoyed everyone you won‘t get the job. (Please note that since Ausbildung is meant for german citizens it‘s rare to get a Ausbildung in english so you‘ll need to be proficient in german (B2 if you‘re lucky, C1 if you don‘t want to say goodbye to your free time for the time of your Ausbildung) and you‘ll need proof that whatever you did before applying to the Ausbildung considered to be comparable to a „mittlere Reife“ or higher)


Arguss

> and you‘ll need proof that whatever you did before applying to the Ausbildung considered to be comparable to a „mittlere Reife“ or higher) What is a "mittlere Reife"?


YourHumbleDude

It's a German diploma you receive after finishing your secondary education (i.e. "Realschule"). It's less valuable/useful than a high school degree, as most apprenticeships require applicants to have at least a "Mittlere Reife" degree.


westerschelle

Isn't a high school degree more comparable to Hauptschulabschluss/Realschulabschluss though?


Dev_Sniper

There are 3 different types of school in germany after primary school: Hauptschule / „Werkrealschule“ which basically keeps you from being homeless but you won‘t have to many job opportunities and it‘s generally looked down upon. It takes 8/9 years. Realschule which is okay but not great. After finishing your 10 years in Realschule & completing the exams you‘re awarded with the „mittlere Reife“ which is necessary for most „Ausbildungen“. Gymnasium is for those who did well in primary school and for those who want to get a academic degree (Baechelors/Masters/PhD/…). It took 13 years, then 12 in most states and now some are switching back to 13. it‘s more complex, usually more focused on theory, etc. and after completing the final exams & avoiding failing 1 of the 4 semesters that count towards the final grades you can finally get a degree at a university. Some people who finished the „Gymnasium“ and got awarded with the so called „Abitur“ choose to do a Ausbildung but most people try to get into university. Since that system is relatively unique it‘s hard to guess which countries have equivalent finals etc. and which grades equate to a german grade.


Arguss

So the Ausbildungen are the apprenticeships, right? What do Hauptschule students do if they can't qualify for those?


Dev_Sniper

You could always go to a „Abendschule“ and get higher education (mittlere Reife or Abitur) while studying / working / … As far as I know there are some Ausbildungen that are open to those with a „Hazptschulabschluss“ as well but I couldn‘t name any since I‘m not interested in any of those and I never had to get information about them. In general it‘s more likely to be accepted if you‘ve got a higher education than other applicants so even if those with a „Hauptschulsbschluss“ could try any Ausbildung they want they would probably have to stick to less popular fields due to the competition


XTXC

Actually you should be able to apply to Ausbildungen nevertheless and if anyone accepts you, you can apply for a working visa. If you know what Ausbildung suits you, look for bigger companies providing those and call them. It may take time but some will eventually talk to you. Best of luck.


H_Flashman

There are 2.6 million Germans unemployed at the moment. Ask yourself: Do I have an advantage for a prospective employer over those 2.6 million?


ethemenanki

2,6 Mio is a very low unemployment rate, there are always people in a system who don't want or can't work. Actually the number being so low atm, means his chances are higher


ethemenanki

We have a huge lack of workers in handcraft jobs (besides nurses). So there are good chances for everyone coming from abroad to find a job e.g. as a roofer, builder, electrician, plumber or similar. BUT Ausbildung takes up to 3 years and is paid poorly... there are payments from the government you can apply for, as soon as you have a job and a visa. The government will pay for your apartment and there are always possibilities to get free food at the 'Tafel'. If you are good and motivated and willing to search and maybe even move, you will 99% get a job after finishing. Again BUT... please do not expect getting into the German system being easy. We have one of the best and fairest systems in the world, why a lot of people want to immigrate to our relatively small country. However: The system might be a lot better than most countries, but it is far from perfect and it is definitely overstressed!!! There is a small chance to get in, find a job, work hard while making almost no money the first 4 years and then finding a decent (but monotonous) job and an apartment, which sets you up for a 'normal' life within about 5 years. The advantage in Germany is not getting anything for free... it is a justice system that works properly (not perfect) a social system that guarantees you to not having to live on the streets or starve (but does not guarantee you a high live standard, if you don't work hard) and a political system, which represents most minorities and gives them a voice (but change goes slow and hearing does not mean it will result in action any time soon). The more likely way things will go is: you will have to search for a low paid Ausbildungsplatz for quite a while, in addition to learning German. If you find something you might have problems adjusting to the work load or to adjust to cultural differences. Many handcraft/nursing jobs are very challenging and stressful ESPECIALLY for the boss!!! Therefore there are a lot of companies which are led by overwhelmed bosses, who are not happy with their situation and will be asswholes. As it will be hard for you to find a Ausbildungsplatz, you might have to stay with an asswhole for 3 years... and you will have to be nice and work hard despite being 'bullied' in a way. After that you might have problems finding a good company or in cities... an apartment. It might take you 5-10 years of stress, feeling lonely and working your ass of to be part of the German system. After that you could apply for higher education and climb up the ladder with hard work and a little luck. More likely you will work in the same job with repeating tasks for 50-60 years, but you will receive a small, but regular payment for the rest of your life in the end. You will be safe and your kids will have better chances in this world.


1istheloniestnumber

The Ausbildung is like an internship with going to school. You get paid, but mostly you can't afford to live alone. If you want to be a butcher, baker or other stuff like that, that nobody wants to do in Germany anymore your chances are higher that you can stay after your Ausbildung. "Nice" Jobs like in an office or something like that is a cut-throat business, you can be lucky that someone retires exactly the same time you finish the Ausbildung, but wouldn't count on it. The Ausbildung is also mostly in German, so is the school that goes with it, so b2 German at least is necessary. But if that doesn't scare you go for it, a lot of companies are still looking.


Glittering_Sun_8829

Can you get a part time job while being part of ausbildung?


1istheloniestnumber

If your boss is okay with it, but the Ausbildung is pretty hard on its own.