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Was I racial stereotyping in my essay?

Was I racial stereotyping in my essay?

brokenboysoldiers

Eeeh, I kind of agree with the teacher in that I think the conclusion you drew was aa bit naive or short-sighted. However, I think within the context of the exercise your interpretation was fair and it's pretty disingenuous to accuse you of stereotyping when the video had racial undertones to begin with. In other words, I feel like they were intentionally setting you up to fail. Was this assignment supposed to specifically be about race or something? If they are a good teacher, you would be able to have a conversation with them about why you came to the conclusion you did, and they could explain why they felt your interpretation of the video was racial stereotyping. It *should* be their job to educate you and help you open your mind so you can be receptive to new thoughts and ideas.


jynxthechicken

This is a great take


updown27

Disclaimer: I'm white My guess is you made some assumptions about what it means to be from "the hood". What kind of hood do you think this man would be from in order to know how to sing gospel style music? The answer will be unique to the individual. Making assumptions about his upbringing based on your preconceived ideas about what predominately black neighborhoods and churches then yeah that's racial profiling. I think this experience is such a great learning tool and I hope you can take a new perspective. We don't know exactly what you wrote and am not sure if my pov gets to the crux of the issue but these are my thoughts on it. I'm glad to have had the opportunity to consider my own preconcieved ideas about what I think of when I hear about "the hood" and how that may misrepresent the variety of lived experiences.


draconicmonkey

I don't think it was racially stereotyping but it was a pretty big assumption. There are plenty of people who sing in different styles without experiencing the background source of that style. They simply practice the style. As an example there are many rappers who grew up rich in wealthy neighborhoods and never experienced any of the "hood" life style that they may include in their songs.


aguynamedbry

I think we need to start thinking about these things on a scale of 1-10 (Jason sedekis I believe promoted this idea). Was it? The people affected would have to judge. How much? Very low on the scale...


McCrysler

Could you elaborate a little more please?


aguynamedbry

I can't judge confidently if you were. It's not severe enough for me personally to say. If it WAS racial stereotyping, was it severe? I would vote it was low on a scale of 1 to 10. Instead of "yes" "no" I believe it's useful to look at how major of an issue it is. I don't think it was a high level offense (if it was).


idekmydude1

The way you said it made me (and probably many other POCs) cringe. Obviously I didn’t see the video but my understanding of a black person asking another black person to sing the “hood” version is probably to show the stereotype others put them in. It’s the “white voice” thing where if you don’t speak like the white people around you they assume you’re “hood” or from a lower income area where in reality it could just be how you were raised to speak. So yeah, you arguing that the person had experienced being in a hood just because he sang the song with more passion and soul - something that is associated with black churches - when asked to sing the “hood” version of it does come off as racial stereotyping. Idk whether you meant that or not, but all I’m saying is I can see how the prof got to that conclusion.


novichux

I think if you changed your wording from "hood" to "experiences" it may been perceived as less of a stereotype. In your case you were just commenting using the language and framework suggested by the speaker. I wouldn't worry about it. Just take it as good advice and make any changes needed.


lydiaj02

I think it’s racial stereotyping on your teachers part to assume “hood” is only black people. That aside, you didn’t really do anything wrong. Is the conclusion you came to a bit short sighted? Yes, but it’s not racial stereotyping. You didn’t say black = hood, you said that because he had knowledge of a type of singing, specific to the “hood”, that he may have grown up in it, which tbh, is fair on a surface level. Your teacher is really overreaching with that.


Tech-ML

I think the teacher may be overeaching a bit. But let me ask you this, if no one has ever experienced a thunderstorm but has given examples of it, seen pictures or videos of it. Could they not also dance like a thunderstorm. Experience is a factor but I don’t think it’s a requirement here.


RevenantBosmer91

This right here. This is why your teacher said what she did. You assumed a person of color is "from the hood" for knowing what a "hood" is. A lot of people carry prejudice without realizing it, what's important is that you acknowledge it and make a conscious effort to familiarize yourself with a people that you, have demonstrated, know very little of.


McCrysler

That’s understandable. All I know is that it was not my intention to stereotype


Tech-ML

Yeah I don’t think it was either and the teacher should have given you that benefit.


jynxthechicken

My sister went to school to be a social worker. The teachers at least where she went don't really give the BotD. They kinda beat it into you that you need to get as far away from anything that could be considered bigoted so you can be a better social worker. Not saying this approach is right or wrong. Just relting my sister experience.


updown27

Intention doesn't change anything. It's not necessarily a moral evaluation to say "hey I think you have some preconceived notions that may be causing you to make some inaccurate or hurtful assumptions about this person". It's a learning opportunity and important conversation. It's not easy to learn where we fall short if we are not corrected and open to correction.


Tech-ML

Sure, and had the teacher asked questions, gained understanding and provided guidance I would consider that a learning opportunity.


updown27

Since we don't know what was said in the essay or how exactly the teacher responded I guess it's hard to say what was gained in the classroom but the conversation is being had here which is in itself the learning opportunity. It's up to OP to consider what preconceived notions were at play when writing their essay as opposed to simply asking for a yes/no judgment on whether they used racial profiling.


Tech-ML

💯 not sure who downvoted you but everything you said is correct


Ghostygrilll

Context: was going over how the audience member knew how to sing it “hood” required in the essay or did you just put that in there? It’s a pretty heavy conclusion to come to, as while I would never do it because I’m white, I still know what the hood is and some “cultural” hood music associated with it. While many artists do use personal experiences in their work, it is fairly easy to mimick the work of others, especially singing, without the “cultural” experience behind it. So I would say that it is heavily stereotyped. I ask you this… if it was a white man in the audience who sang “hood” and did it well, would you have come to the same conclusion?


McCrysler

To be honest, I would think of making the same assumption. Anyone can live in the hood no matter what race. I understand your point though


East-Zookeepergame20

An essay is a forum for thoughtful examination, so what you may have said in one sentence (…he must have experienced the hood…) was an opportunity to dig deeper into why you thought that. Then you edit the essay for an opportunity to realize you push past a reactionary declarative into a more thoughtful engagement with the topic. So, obviously, I’m wishing your teacher had helped more and guided the moment to process the topic/assignment with insight in the medium of writing as an opportunity to go further to see beyond the initial reaction.


thefuckingrougarou

I disagree with the teacher simply because the actual host said to sing the “hood” addition. What are you supposed to think? How are you supposed to react to that? The host was racially stereotyping and you simply responded


Jazzcat00

No more racially stereotyping than that Ted talker that asked for a "hood" version, imo


Kanagaguru

If the guest tells him to sing it hood style it seems.that the host knew or assumed the man was familiar with the hood


jumbomingus

While it’s “stereotyping,” it’s not necessarily *bad* or *harmful* stereotyping. We all stereotype. It’s impossible to completely disregard our stereotypes. Maybe that was actually the prof’s lesson.


jumbomingus

I might also question whether it’s a *racial* stereotype, per se, or something more specific, like: People who respond immediately to a suggestion that they do something *hood* have experience with a hood.