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Week 28 What are you reading?

Week 28 What are you reading?

FlamingoCollector

Blood Orange - for the category ‘Title with a Flavour’ - by Susan Wittig Albert. Most of her China Bayles series would work for this category as they mostly have herbs or other botanicals in their titles. Haven’t gotten very far into it. Yesterday finished The Last Bookshop in London, which was a Book Bub recommendation/ purchase. Loved it!!❤️❤️❤️


sparklingsnow46

I just finished “Cool for the Summer” And loved it. I also read “Stay Gold”. My next book is A Clockwork Orange. I’m on book 63/100 now.


johnpoulain

**The Tides of War** by **Stephen Pressfield** On a re-read and having read around the history of the time as well as knowing the general plot I found the book much less confusing, even though the narrative structure and framing device still seems to move with a very random purpose, arguing that in a totally free democracy the meaner people pull down the greater really seems to land when they list the great Leaders of Athens: Themistocles, Cimon, Miltiades, Alcibiades whom were exiled from the city or killed after great achievements. The death of Socrates is also covered, arguing that one who has profited under the laws doesn't have the right to ignore them when they go not to his liking. Im a big fan of Pressfield's work and would recommend to someone interested in historical fiction and the period but you might need a wikipedia article or two to help guide you through.


kohiilover

**The First Filipino,** an award winning biography of Jose Rizal by Leon Ma Guerrero. I just finished the historical novel **The Paris Library** yesterday


saturn60148

I just finished **Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City** by Matthew Desmond. Highly recommend, one of the most stunning portraits of poverty in the US out there. I’m listening to **Midnight, Water City** by Chris McKinney, which is a dystopian sci-fi noir. The audiobook narrator is perfect for the hard boiled detective genre with his gritty masculine voice, and I’m enjoying it overall.


candymesss

i am reading at least 10 books at the moment but ones of the best are for sure the ones by Simone de Beauvoir. I fell in love with this extremely educated and well readed woman. She is fabulous. The Second Gender is a must! I am reading also Memoirs of dutiful woman and I am enjoying it ☺️ The woman destroyed is one of my fav books.


sparklingsnow46

Omg how!?


traj21

First Love by Ivan Turgenev


slimeman420

I’m 34 books in rn, currently reading The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon. I’m halfway through and enjoying it a lot. It’s a longer book, so I will probably still be reading it next week.


sparklingsnow46

WHAT 34!? Edit- read this as you’re reading 34 at once Lmaoo oops


Fanytale

Just finished with The Midnight Library and didn’t like it at all. It felt like a chore to read but trudged on to give it a fair chance after looking at all the raving reviews. Will be starting either Song of Achilles or Malibu Rising next!


Jithran

I just finished The Seven 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle and just started Becoming from Michelle Obama. Quite different from each other but both very nice/interesting reads


Via4

My thoughts exactly- lily allens autobiography


litgoals687

Exhalation by Ted Chiang


alexquacksalot

Just finished the Giver Quartet after finishing the third book sometime mid last year. Started the Starless Sea earlier today and I'm loving it!


fxuk

The Last House Guest by Megan Miranda


Yoga_girl_91

Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult


bonbondujour

I'm reading 2 books right now. Immortal Poems of the English Language edited by Oscar Williams Circe by Madeline Miller.


bibliobaggins7

Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall. My first attempt at geopolitics, and it's been a very interesting read so far!


deeptravel2

I finished **Think Again** by Adam Grant and **Supreme Commander** by Steven Ambrose (about Gen Eisenhower in WWII). Today I started The **Things They Carried** by Tim O'Brien. I'm also reading **Lady with the Dog and Other Stories** by Anton Chekhov (a short story collection).


urball

I finished *Switch* by A. S. King last night. I’m currently listening to the audiobook of *Furious Hours* by Casey Cep and will start reading *Angels and Demons* by Dan Brown today.


ValleyStardust

I just finished Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein for the first time. I’m thinking about reading A Tree Grows in Brooklyn next.


hodgkinsonable

I finished reading **The Complete Alice** by Lewis Carroll. I've obviously had a ton of exposure to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Through the Looking Glass through pop culture, but this is the first time I've ever read them. I did like the nonsense, and the illustrations were great, but I had a feeling on unease knowing a bit of the odd background in how the story came about. I preferred the first too, it got old by the second book (though the Jaberwocky poem is a classic). I'm reading **The Once and Future Witches** by Alix E. Harrow, and also **The God is Not Willing** by Steven Erikson which I'm loving.


aztine

I just finished reading To Kill a Kingdom by Alexandra Cristo and I loved it! Currently reading Piranesi by Susanna Clarke.


littlebutcute

Reading: Tyler Johnson Was Here by Jay Coles. Highly recommend if you liked The Hate U Give! I don’t usually read books with male leads (cause I read 90% male leads in HS and I hated them all) but I am really liking this book.


steelcitygator

Was supposed to have finished **War and Peace** by Leo Tolstoy this week but ended up having to do some last-minute traveling and didn't get as much reading done as I had hoped. Will for sure finish this week though.


mmmmgummyvenus

I'm reading Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld - loving it. Then I might read The Lamplighters by Emma Stonex


HappySisyphus22

I started with "The People in the Trees" by Hanya Yanagihara. It's a very slow read, might go on till 50% to see if it gets interesting.


uglybutterfly025

Things have been very busy around here, my fiance just got offered a new job, we have to be out of our current place by the 31st, but we don't have a place lined up yet, so I'm cleaning and packing not knowing where we are going. I dove headfirst back in to Animal Crossing New Horizons, my comfort game lol but I still managed to finish a book this week after taking a 5 day reading break over 4th of july weekend. I finished **Winter in Paradise** by Elin Hilderbrand. Her books offer no substance by damn they are easy to read and super dramatic. The kind of dramatic I love because there is no on page death/murder/abuse in this book but the drama is still top notch. Good read for like $5 at Half Price books, I'll get rid of this one and read the second book through my library. I'm also about 100 pages in to **Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy** by David Burns which was recommended to me by my therapist. I am trying to read one nonfiction/educational book and one fun book at the same time. This book has an easy to digest tone, but I find that the examples Burns mentions don't really fit me like I anticipated they would


1004yoon

Currently reading~ 1. Ninth House- I'm a bit bored with this one. Not a lot is happening 2. Circe- I'm liking it more than I expected. Not as much as Song Of Achilles though 3. Slippery Creatures- really liking it. I'm just devouring K.J. Charles' books these days


hindiproverb

I am currently reading: - गुनाहों का देवता (The God of Sins) by Dharamveer Bharti This famous hindi novel was translated into English as Chander and Sudha. - The Long Walk by Stephen King My next to read is: - Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier


NotPrunes

The Long Walk is so good. It’s one of my favorite shorter works by King.


verylargeworm

I’m reading Jailbird by Kurt Vonnegut. Vonnegut is my refresh after books that weren’t my favorite or were slow. Also planning to start either Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and/or Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler.


Dan_IAm

Recently I finished **The Pig That Wants To Be Eaten** by *Julian Baggini*, **Bedlam (Skulduggery Pleasant 12)** by *Derek Landy*, and **What We Talk About When We Talk About Love** by *Raymond Carver*. (I usually like to have a few very different reads going at any one time). Right now I’ve started a reread of **Blindsight**, a reread of **Of Mice and Men**, and a reread of **Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince**, and wow it didn’t click that these are all rereads until I wrote this sentence.


dailydoseofDANax

This week I finished **Survive the Night by Riley Sager** and really liked it! I didn't love it as much of his other books, but thought it was a fun, quick summer read. I already can't wait for his next book!! I also read **The Push by Audrey Audrain** and it was truly unputdownable and easily became one of my favorite books of the year! Truly horrifying for a book that's not even in the horror genre. It was a great blend of Baby Teeth meets The Bad Seed. The third book I read this week was **The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris** and I also really liked that one as well! It had one fo the most wild epilogues of a thriller I've ever read. I'm also currently reading and really liking **Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid**! So all in all, a really solid week of reading and I was happy with every book I read! :)


jennyskywalker

I've started reading a biography of Ravi Shankar by Oliver Craske called Indian Sun... its huge but incredibly fascinating and well written! Really enjoying it


Tomofthegwn

I finished up two books this past week (38 & 39/52). Gone with the Wind and Animal Farm. I am still trying to figure out what I am going to read next!


enbydragonmonarch

Whoa, two great classics down, that's awesome! Hope you can find another book to read next sometime soon! Happy reading! <3


enbydragonmonarch

Hey all! Hope everyone is doing all right and happy this fine time <3 ​ Finished reading: **69. Furia** by Yamile Saied Mendez **70. The Dissociative Identity Disorder Sourcebook** by Deborah Bray Haddock. **71. Spirit Run** by Noe Alvarez ​ Currently reading: **72. Violet and Daisy** by Sarah Miller **73. Apple** by Eric Gansworth ​ Normally don't go for biographies, but thought going for a couple of interesting ones would do for now, especially since the latter is from a good author we know of! ​ Books looking forward to picking up and reading this upcoming week include: **The Martian** by Andy Weir **Hola Papi!** by John Paul Brammer **Black Water Sister** by Zen Cho ​ Happy reading, and wishing everyone well! <3


cany19

53. **Ball Lightning** - Cixin Liu (3/5) 54. **Ravenmaster: Life With the Ravens at the Tower of London** - Christopher Skaife (4/5) 55. **Something to Say** - Lisa Moore Ramee (read because my grandson was reading it so we could discuss it together 🥰) (5/5) Current (56): **Provenance** - Ann Leckie - I’m loving this so far. It’s in the same universe as her Imperial Radch trilogy which I also loved.


farawayflote

I’m at 33 books for the year! Since my last check in I’ve finished: - **Ask Iwata** by Satoru Iwata (Hobonichi, Ed.) (3/5 stars). I don’t think I’m enough of a Nintendo fan to have got as much out of this book as my friend who lent it to me, but it was a short and sweet read. - **Crooked Kingdom** by Leigh Bardugo (4.5/5 stars). Finally finished after putting aside at 75% in 2018! I love the characters. - **Carry On** by Rainbow Rowell (3.5/5 stars). I’ll admit I binged this book in less than 24 hours. I read **Fangirl** last year so this felt very familiar. - **Wayward Son** by Rainbow Rowell (4/5 stars). I also binged this one haha and I liked it more than the first book— it felt a little more original/unique. - **The Topeka School** by Ben Lerner (4/5 stars). - **Ninth House** by Leigh Bardugo (5/5 stars). This is now on my all-time favorites list! Absolutely loved it, and loved Darlington’s character. - **Earth Keeper** by N. Scott Momaday (3/5 stars). This was a bit short for my taste but I liked the reflections and imagery.


inlalaland04

So glad to see someone else who enjoyed Wayward Son more than Carry On. I loved WS. It is one of the few YA books I have read that felt like I was reading about real young adults.


Beecakeband

Rainbow Rowell is so fantastic. I can't wait til the next Simon Snow book comes out


farawayflote

Yes!! I couldn’t believe my luck when I finished the second book and saw how soon the third comes out! I’ve loved all her books that I’ve read


Beecakeband

Just picked up the third book and I'm a squeaky very excited mess


Beecakeband

It's in a few days I'm so very very excited!


snowball17

Last week I read **Moonflower Murders** by Anthony Horowitz and **Klara and the Sun** by Kazuo Ishiguro. I just started reading **The House in the Cerulean Sea** by TJ Klune and I should get John Green’s **The Anthropocene Reviewed** in from the library in a few days.


Beecakeband

I'm so jealous you're reading Cerulean Sea for the first time!! That book is absolutely amazing


BookyCats

I am reading: **Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid.** I am loving it so far. I greatly enjoyed The Seven Husbands Of Evelyn Hugo. And saw good recommendations for **Starfish by Lisa Fipps**. Oh **Bill Bryson**, I wanted to love your book, but I have stalled out at 43% of **A Walk In The Woods**. Do I keep trying? I finished: **Pumpkin by Julie Murphy** \- 5/5. I loved this one so much. I cheered so hard for Wayan and fell in love with his sister Clem and Hannah too. It was magical. **You Can Do All Things: Drawings, Affirmations and Mindfulness to Help With Anxiety and Depression by Kate Allan - 5/5.** I loved her drawings online forever and found out she had a book. Super touching, encouraging thoughts with adorable and beautiful artwork. **Wait Till Helen Comes by Mary Downing Hahn.** I found this one in a little library, and it was a silly children's ghost book. It was pretty awful as an adult, but kid me would have eaten it up and been scared to say Helen's name.


Kas_Bent

I read *Wait Till Helen Comes* as a kid and it terrified me lol.


BookyCats

Oh I so get that lol.


Beecakeband

Malibu Rising is great so far! I was so excited to pick it up and it's fun so far


BookyCats

I freaking love it.


enbydragonmonarch

>You Can Do All Things: Drawings, Affirmations and Mindfulness to Help With Anxiety and Depression by Kate Allan As soon as I heard of this and your comments on it, just had to look it up. It looks so adorable and cute! Will definitely consider browsing through this one. Happy reading! <3


jjolynn

The Guilty Feminist by Deborah Frances-White!


enbydragonmonarch

Ooo, that sounds like an interesting one! What do you think of it so far?


jjolynn

It’s very thought provoking, I’m enjoying it so far!


crimsonebulae

I am working on two shorter books this week. The first is Aeschylus' **Prometheus Bound** which is actually a re-read. I like picking it up every few years because I've always really liked it, and how Zeus comes out looking like an ass. The second is Tolstoy's **Death of Ivan Ilyich**, even though after Anna Karenina I swore off tolstoy, but decided to read it because I feel I see it recommended all the time on Reddit. I am about halfway through, and nothing really life changing is happening so far, even though I am enjoying it. I feel people say this book changes their lives a lot, so maybe it is in the second half.


enbydragonmonarch

I'm glad you're deciding to give an author you didn't prefer a second chance! Also, I think that's a good idea to work through shorter books sometimes, to help in between longer books as well and kinda just enjoy the process of reading. Happy reading! <3


irravalanche

I’m reading **Girl, Woman, Other** by Bernardine Evaristo (enjoying it immensely but the translation I have is a shitshow) and also reading the first book in the Witcher series.


enbydragonmonarch

I've heard that *Girl, Woman, Other* is really good! What do you think of the Witcher so far? We've read a few books in the series, but haven't picked it back up in years, to be honest, lol. Happy reading! <3


irravalanche

I love the universe and the story and the pace but the way the author portrays women is soo cringy. Boobs boobs boobity boobs


liz410

Oh man I hate that! Thanks for this comment - good to know before investing time.


Cucurrucucu_paloma

Read - The Associate byJohn Grisham and Persuasion Currently reading - The Double & Sanctuary by Faulkner: hopefully I can finally finish these this week. Just started Wuthering Heights and I love the tone already


GarbagePailKid90

It's the middle of winter here so because the weather has been cold and gloomy I've been more in the mood for gothic and horror fiction. Over the last two weeks I've read: **The Reaping** by Bernard Taylor. This one was really interesting, it's quite a slow burn but I kept turning the pages because I wanted to see where the story went. I really enjoyed the book and loved that every little thread of the story tied together nicely in the end. **The Mary Shelley Club** by Goldy Moldavsky. This was recommended to me and isn't my usual type of read but I decided to give it a go. I loved all the horror movie references in the book and the story was interesting but I didn't feel like it really went anywhere profound or super exciting. **When Darkness Loves Us** by Elizabeth Engstrom. This is a book that has two novellas in it. The first one was really fascinating because it was relatively fast paced and went to unexpected places. The second one I really enjoyed because it was a slow burn story that I had no idea where it was going but I was just enjoying going along with the plot. I'm currently reading **Plain Bad Heroines** by Emily M. Danforth and **The Art of Statistics: Learning From Data** by David Spiegelhalter.


artymas

This week I'm reading: A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. I loved Rules of Civility, so I'm not sure why it's taken me so long to start this one. It's lovely so far. I'm always interested in books set in Russia post-WWI. Black Nerd Problems by William Evans and Omar Holmon. This is an ARC I got and it's already a gut buster. I always enjoy seeing/reading about something I love (comics, video games, general nerdy stuff) through a different lens. The City We Became by N. K. Jemisin. One of my friends recommends this book every time I ask for a rec, so I'm finally cracking it open.


BookyCats

A Gentlemen In Moscow has been on my TBR forever. I heard it is charming.


Synnov_e

Hey guys! Hope everyone had a great week! Finished: Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult. 5/5 for me. Audiobook. What a story!!! First, the narrators were all excellent! They embodied the characters flawlessly! There is so many intricate details, a back story to all the characters and an incredible plot twist that seamlessly ties the whole thing together and that you never saw coming - at least I didn’t. A great read all around! I recommend it to everyone! Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner. 4/5. What trapped me from the get-go was the nostalgic feeling about it, from the start you “catch feelings” and won’t stop feeling until you reach the end. It made me miss my mom terribly. The story is well written and has weight, I like what the author did with the memories of her mother’s last days and the pain jumps out at you, demanding to be shared with the reader. Great read! The Hill We Climb: An Inaugural Poem for the Country by Amanda Gorman. 5/5. Audiobook, read by the author. This one became available in my library and I picked it up remembering I really enjoyed her poem back in January. I thought it could be maybe more than JUST the poem being read by her, alas…no. It’s so short I don’t know if I should count it towards my challenge but whatever. I still like the poem! The only thing I could’ve done without - Oprah fans beware - is Oprah’s foreword. Kinda meh because she tried to sound poetic and it’s hard to do against Gorman’s musicality and talent. Started: Oona out of order by Margarita Montimore. Audiobook. This caught my attention and so far, so good! Very interesting read and can’t wait to see where it goes. Have fun! :)


enbydragonmonarch

Also enjoyed The Hill We Climb! That was a really good poem. I think it's fair to say you can cheat the system and count it into your reading challenge ;) Happy reading! <3


bleuish

Right now: Lakewood - Megan Giddings. It's pretty short and I was reading something else at the same time that I was loving more. This is fine, though, and I'm just getting to the interesting parts. The Girl Who Drank the Moon - Kelly Barnhill. Didn't realize this was a children's book so should go by super quickly. So far is enjoyable enough


foreverzonedout

The Prince of Milk! excited to see where it goes. have a few unfinished ones from about a month ago but don't feel like getting to them just yet.


mad_scientist43

Finished Where the Wild Ladies Are, highly recommend it. It's a collection of contemporary short stories based on Japanese folktales. There's a summary of the original tales included. Reading Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi this week.


Synnov_e

Is the author Aoko Matsuda? I’ll add it to my TBR! Thank you!


mad_scientist43

Yes, that's it. I made a mistake in the title on the original post - it's Where the Wild Ladies Are.


el3ctricfeel

In the middle of **Cosmos** by Carl Sagan, and just started **The Secret Lives of Church Ladies** by Deesha Philyaw I just finished **If I Was Your Girl** by Meredith Russo, which was just okay imo, 3/5, and **The Art of Fielding** by Chad Harbach which I loved, 5/5


uglybutterfly025

I've read Carl Sagan's daughter's book **For Small Creatures Such as We** and really enjoyed it


el3ctricfeel

I had no idea she had a book!


Larn01

Just finished project hail Mary Currently reading white rose (#2 the lone city) And the kind worth killing


enbydragonmonarch

It's kind of funny you just finished Project Hail Mary, because The Martian by the same author (Andy Weir) is next on our list! What did you think of it? Is it worth a read?


Larn01

It was amazing! I have the Martian on my list too. Projecy hail Mary was for my bookclub and this was the first time nobody disliked the book!


DernhelmLaughed

This week, I read: A couple of graphic novels: * *Monstress, Vol. 1: Awakening* by Marjorie Liu & Sana Takeda (Such pretty artwork!) * *Ice Haven* by Daniel Clowes The first book (*Shadow and Bone*) and some stories from Leigh Bardugo's Grishaverse: * *The Demon in the Wood: A Darkling Prequel Story* * *The Witch of Duva* * *The Tailor* Two excellent, excellent novellas by Nghi Vo; just great storytelling: * *The Empress of Salt and Fortune* * *When the Tiger Came Down the Mountain* Also read a couple of new-to-me authors, who were thoroughly enjoyable and make me want to read their respective follow-up novels: * *The Golem and the Jinni* by Helene Wecker * *The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo* by Taylor Jenkins Reid Currently in-progress with readalongs: * *Dune* by Frank Herbert * *The Lord of The Rings* by JRR Tolkien * *The Poppy War* by RF Kuang


uglybutterfly025

Everything by Taylor Jenkins Reid is good! She has a short story/novella that is excellent as well


DernhelmLaughed

Good to know! I have heard *Daisy Jones and the Six* is good too. *Evelyn Hugo* was just such a breezy read.


enbydragonmonarch

It looks like you've gotten a lot of reading done! Kind of jealous! lol, what's your secret? Happy reading! <3


DernhelmLaughed

One of the novels was a longterm read, and I just happened to finish it this week. Happy reading to you too!


LordofDisorder

Monstress is such a gorgeous comic. I finally read the second volume through the library a few weeks ago and it did not disappoint


bleuish

Honestly most of these are in my next up pile!


runswithlibrarians

This week I finished Severance by Ling Ma. Probably 3/5 for me. I didn’t love it, but I didn’t hate it either. I kind of felt like it ended just as I was really starting to get interested. Next up is Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell, which I will be reading for book club. Don’t know much about it.


Synnov_e

I enjoyed Talking to Strangers, it’s very well researched and interesting! Enjoy!


TeenieBop

Still reading **The Break** by Marian Keyes. I wasn't too fussed initially then without realising it I've becoming hooked. Should finish it today hopefully which will take me to 26 so far this year.


Synnov_e

I started it and felt super underwhelmed, I must be like 10% in, does it get better?


TeenieBop

Yeah it's a bit slow to start but then it just clicked and now I need to know how it ends!


vicmcqueen

I'm currently reading **Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata.** I heard someone talking about this one on Booktube and thought it sounded like an interesting, quick read. I'm about halfway through the book and enjoying it so far. I'm also currently listening to the audiobook for **The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires by Grady Hendrix.** Last year, I started a tradition of listening to the audiobook version of my favorite book of the previous year. This was my favorite book last year, so now I'm listening to the audiobook! I'm usually not a fan of re-reads, but I'm really enjoying diving back into the story and picking up on new things. I hope I can finish Convenience Store Woman by the end of today. Next I want to either read **Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid** or **The Last Thing He Told Me by Laura Dave**. Last week, I read **The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo** and loved it so much that I immediately drove to the bookstore to buy Malibu Rising - my mom bought Last Thing on the same day and already finished/lent it to me... not sure which to read first!


BookyCats

Oh I loooove Convenience Store Woman. The is another book by the author out this year, it looks just as good.


LordofDisorder

I've got three going right now **Crime and Punishment** I am tantalizingly close to the end. I picked this to satisfy a challenge prompt for something intimidating, and I'm pretty happy with it. I'll definitely be reading more Dostoevsky in the future. **Silicon Values** by Jillian York, which is all about big social media companies' relationship to free speech. Very readable as far as this kind of journalistic nonfiction goes, it's been a nice easy nonfiction to contrast the Dostoevsky. York is very much an expert on the subject and it shows. **Japanese Death Poems** compiled by Yoel Hoffman. This is essentially a big collection of death poems written mostly by monks and haiku poets. I've become more interested in haiku lately, I think sometimes they require the reader to sit with them for awhile to fully appreciate, which I've only just recently been able to actually do. I'm only about halfway through it, but it's just fantastic. I would highly recommend it to anyone with an interest in poetry, Japanese history, and especially both.


Kas_Bent

Finished only one over the last two weeks: **Star Eater** by Kerstin Hall, narrated by Samara Naeymi (audiobook). It was sort of a mashup between *The Handmaid's Tale* and Motherland: Fort Salem, and I really liked it. The narration was very good, but the ending felt rushed and incomplete. 4/5 Currently reading: **A Good Day for Chardonnay** by Darynda Jones, narrated by Lorelei King (audiobook). Loving it just as much as the first book and the narrator is mostly great. It's just the voice she uses for the teenage daughter makes it sound like she's a young child and it really bothers me. I may just read the next book instead like I did for the first one. **Lonesome Dove** by Larry McMurtry. Ah, now we get into Part 1 of Why My Reading Drastically Slowed This Month. This is the August read for my local book club and I wanted to give myself a head start since it's so long. It's not bad so far and I really like some of the characters, though all the talk slows it down a lot for me. **Project Hail Mary** by Andy Weir. And this is Part 2 of Why My Reading Drastically Slowed This Month. Reading this along with /r/bookclub and loving it so far. **Mistborn** by Brandon Sanderson. Finally, Part 3 of Why My Reading Drastically Slowed This Month. Again, it's with /r/bookclub. I was hesitant because I loved *Skyward* so much, but I'm enjoying it so far, even if I don't quite understand how all the Allomancy stuff works yet. I'm trying to balance those last three out for the entire month to stay on schedule for everything, but I'm afraid I may have taken on more than I can handle in a month.


uglybutterfly025

It will be satisfying when you finish all these big books though! If found the first 100 to 150 pages of **Mistborn** to be more of a drag than the last 400 pages


Kas_Bent

I'm going to feel so accomplished when I'm finally done. XD


rozieg

Lonesome Dove picked up for me around page 125-127 and then I couldn’t put it down! Good luck!


ReddisaurusRex

I loved the first Darynda Jones Sunshine book! I am glad to hear you are liking the new one. Just waiting for my copy to come through from the library. Can’t wait! Lonesome Dove is one of my all time favorites. Give it about 1/4 way in until giving up. It’s worth it! Swoon!


Kas_Bent

My favorite things from both Sunshine books are the little sayings from store signs or the police blotter at the beginning of every chapter. It's always hilarious or quirky and makes me wish this town was real.


Joinedformyhubs

**Mistborn The Final Empire** by Brandon Sanderson with r/bookclub. - For a thousand years the ash fell and no flowers bloomed. For a thousand years the Skaa slaved in misery and lived in fear. For a thousand years the Lord Ruler, the "Sliver of Infinity," reigned with absolute power and ultimate terror, divinely invincible. Then, when hope was so long lost that not even its memory remained, a terribly scarred, heart-broken half-Skaa rediscovered it in the depths of the Lord Ruler's most hellish prison. Kelsier "snapped" and found in himself the powers of a Mistborn. A brilliant thief and natural leader, he turned his talents to the ultimate caper, with the Lord Ruler himself as the mark. **A Painted House** by Josh Grisham with my bestie. - or six weeks they pick cotton, battling the heat, the rain, the fatigue, and sometimes each other. As the weeks pass Luke sees and hears things no seven-year-old could possibly be prepared for, and he finds himself keeping secrets that not only threaten the crop but will change the lives of the Chandlers forever. **Station Eleven** by Emily St. John Mandel with girls group.- Set in the days of civilization's collapse, Station Eleven tells the story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity. **Dune** by Frank Herbert with r/bookclub. - Set on the desert planet Arrakis, Dune is the story of the boy Paul Atreides, heir to a noble family tasked with ruling an inhospitable world where the only thing of value is the “spice” melange, a drug capable of extending life and enhancing consciousness. Coveted across the known universe, melange is a prize worth killing for... **A Little Life** by Hanya Yanagihara sirh r/bookclub. - Brace yourself for the most astonishing, challenging, upsetting, and profoundly moving book in many a season. An epic about love and friendship in the twenty-first century that goes into some of the darkest places fiction has ever traveled and yet somehow improbably breaks through into the light. Truly an amazement—and a great gift for its readers. **Rat Queens** vol. 6 by Kurtis J. Wieber and Owen Gieni. -Palisade has a new resident: a strange wizard who wants to end the suffering of others. As the Queens disappear one by one, Betty uncovers a terrifying truth that finally reveals the events following Hannah’s imprisonment in a magical void. Finished: **Project Hail Mary** on audiobook. - Ryland Grace is the sole survivor on a desperate, last-chance mission--and if he fails, humanity and the earth itself will perish. Except that right now, he doesn't know that. He can't even remember his own name, let alone the nature of his assignment or how to complete it. Just started - **They Both Die at the End** by Adam Silvera On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They’re going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There’s an app for that. It’s called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure—to live a lifetime in a single day.


liz410

Hi everyone! Last week I finished: 39. Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman (5/5). This one really sicked me in. I've never read a novel by Gaiman before, but I have been a fan of the Sandman comics for a long time. Glad I wasn't disappointed! 40. Ugly Love by Colleen Hoover (4/5). I haven't read anything by Hoover before and didnt realize just how much sex would be in this book tbh. Enjoyed the book still, because there seemed to be a good connection between the two characters. Right now I'm reading Immoral by Brian Freeman and Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey. I plan to finish both this week, which puts me well ahead of my goal of 52 books this year.


Synnov_e

Sex like in Fifty Shades? (Giggles)


liz410

Lol. I'm not sure actually, I've never read those books if you can believe it!


pipote305

14/20 I started the challenge around April, and was on my way to completely destroy it. Decided to set aside the regular books I've been reading (~350 pages) and started the Song of Ice and Fire series. Finished A Game of Thrones, and I'm making my way through A Clash of Kings. I didn't expect to enjoy reading fantasy as much, so that was a nice surprise.


Synnov_e

The books are amazing! I remember either not sleeping at all or waking up with whichever book in the series I was reading at the moment under my face. Soo good!


ReddisaurusRex

*Finished Reading* 138-144/104 **The Four Winds** by Kristin Hannah 5/5 **The Wonder Boy of Whistle Stop** by Fannie Flag 5/5 **Poppy Harmon and the Hung Jury** (A Desert Flowers Mystery #2) by Lee Hollis 4/5 **Morningside Heights** by Joshua Henkin 3/5 **Fire Keeper’s Daughter** by Angeline Boulley 5/5 **Lily and the Octopus** by Steven Rowley 5/5 **Hororstör** by Grady Hendrix 3.5/5 *Currently Reading* **We Are the Land: A History of Native California** by Damon B. Akins and William J. Bauer **Gathering Moss** by Robin Wall Kimmerer **Wild Women and the Blues** by Dennis S. Bryce


enbydragonmonarch

You are on a roll here! What did you think of Fire Keeper's Daughter? We Are the Land sounds like a really good one, too. Definitely adding it to our to-read list. Happy reading! <3


Joinedformyhubs

I can't wait to read four winds. I have been on hold for that book at the library for months. I started at 115 on the wait list. I'm down to 12 now.


ReddisaurusRex

Same - I think it took me like 7 months for it to come in at the library. Worth the wait. I haven’t loved her other books as much as most people do, but I *LOVED* this one!


Joinedformyhubs

Good to hear! I'm not a fan of Firefly Lane, the friendship is strange to me. If I had a friendship like that I would definitely say goodbye. I also feel the same way when I pick up her books at the bookstore or library. They dont appeal to me. But everyone says they enjoyed four winds so much, I want to try it out!!


fixtheblue

27/52 - My goal for this year was 26 but as I am almost on track for a 52 book year I decided to go for it. ***** Finished; ***** - Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes with r/RoryGilmoreBookclub. Already had me in tears 2 thirds in and that ending. I really liked this book but for some reason I can't call it a 5☆ so 4.5 ***** Still working on; ***** - Middlemarch by George Eliot for r/ayearofmiddlemarch. Another brilliant 2 chapters this week and lots to think about and chew over on the sub. - The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas with r/areadingofmontecristo. Such a good book. I really should devote more time to catching up to the sub. - Don Quixote by Cervantes with r/yearofdonquixote. It has gotten more interesting lately with the introduction of new characters. - Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace with r/infinitesummer. Hoping I am not biting off more than I can chew adding this to my already over stretched currently reading list. - The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read by Phillipa Perry. Never any harm in personal growth especially in the crazy journey that is parenting. - Project Hail Mary by Any Weir for r/bookclub's July "Any" read. A lot of buzz around this one so I have high hopes, and the first couple of chapters seemed promising. Going to hold out judgement just yet though. Looking forward to the 1st discussion tomorrow.  - Mistborn the Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson for r/bookclub's Fantasy read. Oh my goodness....I am hooked and wondering why I waited so long to read this..... ***** Started; ***** - The Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera. It's the bext moderators choice at r/bookclub hosted by myself and u/Joinedformyhubs. 1st discussion is July 12th there is still time to grab a copy and join us. ***** Stay safe and happy reading fellow bookworms 📚


jjolynn

Flowers for Algernon and They Both Die at the End are both SO good!! Hope you’re enjoying them!


Joinedformyhubs

Whew busy Summer for you!!


bittybro

I guess I'm over my reading slump, because I read three books this week. First was **What Fresh Hell is This?** which was only ok for me. I'd learned some stuff, but on the whole, I don't think I was the audience for this, despite being a menopausal woman. I did enjoy the title a lot though. Then, in the mood for a easy-read suspense novel, I read **The Guest Room** by Chris Bohjalian. This guy has apparently written a bunch of books, but I'd never heard of him or them. Plot-wise, this hummed right along and I did not guess the ending. Prose-wise, it was pretty clunky, but not so much so that I wasn't willing just to go along with the plot. It turned out to be about human trafficking, though, so it was more...sad? emotionally affecting?...then the crime thriller/beach read thing I was expecting. Then I read **Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki** which was, for a Murakami novel, sadly lacking in magical realism and cats, but otoh, full of awkward sex dreams, so there was that. Seriously, though, it hit me a little different than the other Murakami I've read, but I didn't dislike it. And then this morning, for another huge change of pace, I started **Northanger Abbey** which I'm finding super witty so far. Happy reading, all!


austingriffis

**Finished** *The Last Mrs. Parrish* by Liv Constantine *The Maidens* by Alex Michaelides **Reading** *Skeleton Crew* by Stephen King


Synnov_e

How was The Maidens?


austingriffis

I really liked it and highly recommend reading The Silent Patient before this if you haven't already.


Synnov_e

NICE! I did read it last year, can’t wait to get my hands on it :D


Joinedformyhubs

I want to start a Stephen King. Is this your first book by him?


austingriffis

No, I've read about 50 of his novels/short story collections. If you're just getting started, here are a few recommendations: * My top 3: Pet Sematary, 11/22/63, Misery * Classic from the 1970's: The Shining * Classic from the 1980's: It * Classic from the 1990's: The Green Mile * Something short: Carrie * Something long: The Stand * Something newer: The Outsider * Crime, not Horror: Mr. Mercedes * Something to accomplish: The Dark Tower series


Joinedformyhubs

Oh wow. Thank you for this impressive list. I had no idea fhat some of these titles were his works.


BookyCats

Misery is my favorite SK book,


VS377

Currently about to start: **Madam** by Phoebe Wynne. I hit the big 150 this week!! I finished: **What Stands in a Storm: Three Days in the Worst Superstorm to Hit the South’s Tornado Alley** by Kim Cross (NF). 4.5/5. **The Photographer** by Mary Dixie Carter. 3/5. **Unwell Women: A Journey Through Medicine and Myth in a Man-Made World** by Elinor Cleghorn (NF). It seems like this book has varying subtitles FYI. 4.5/5. **The Hunting Wives** by May Cobb. 4/5. **Rain: A Natural and Cultural History** by Cynthia Barnett (NF). 4/5. **The Girls at 17 Swann Street** by Yara Zghieb. 4.5/5.


BookyCats

Wow, what a number to hit! Congrats!


Synnov_e

Wow


TheRubyRedPirate

I'm almost finished with **The Butterfly Girl by Rene Denfield** and about to start **The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James**


ambrym

Finished: 62. **Rule of Wolves by Leigh Bardugo** The plot in this is insanely messy but it’s also far more enjoyable than KoS. Several plot points felt slapped together but it was fun and that’s really what I’m reading it for. 4 stars 63. **The Space Between Worlds by Micaiah Johnson** This is a character-driven story rather than an action-filled scifi like I was expecting. Cara is a great MC, she’s a very complex character and several of the side characters (Esther, Jean, and Mr. Cheeks particularly) were really interesting. The romance subplot was a huge flop with zero chemistry but overall the writing is very strong. Ultimately I had a hard time rating this book because, despite knowing that it’s good, I didn’t particularly enjoy it. 3.5 stars Currently reading: **Any Way the Wind Blows by Rainbow Rowell** **The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin**


Synnov_e

I can’t wait to read The Fire Next Time!


lentilqueen

I finally finished Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden. I can understand why people like this book; a Cinderella tale is always appealing. However, I found the characters and plot so flat and one-dimensional that I kept losing interest. I still don’t understand why Sayuri was so interested in the Chairman. I also felt that the cultural descriptions lacked complexity and nuance; for instance, Golden glosses over the Second Sino-Japanese War, WWII, and the American occupation. I’ll definitely read books about this era by Japanese authors in the future. I’m now reading The Runaway Jury by John Grisham, which, so far, is pretty fun.


uglybutterfly025

I loved **Memoirs of a Geisha** when I read it several years ago. I think it's downfall is having a white author, not saying he can't have an in depth idea of the culture, but I think someone of that decent would have done a better job


Synnov_e

I read Memoirs of a Geisha as a teenage girl and that might have had an impact on my opinion of it. I LOVED it! I might read it again and see if I can be more objective about what you have mentioned.


Emmie91

The last letter from your lover by Jojo Moyes because I’m wanting to read the book and then watch the Netflix film 😊


JuraBelle479

Good afternoon fellow readers, hope you are all well and have had a good week! This week I read 31 - **Alif the Unseen by G Willow Wilson** 6.5/10 - I enjoyed the book, the book was well written, the story was engaging. It was a really interesting mix of myth, reality and kinda cyberpunk, almost echoes of Neal Stephenson. However, I felt like I was missing something and I can't quite put my finger on what. I am currently reading: 32 - **The Amber Fury by Natalie Haynes**. A thousand ships was one of my favourite books from last year, this is set in modern day Edinburgh (Drama teacher in a pupil referral unit teaches Greek Tragedy to her damaged charges with tragic results) and is good so far.


Joinedformyhubs

Huge can of A Thousand Ships! I will have to check out Amber Fury.


savannnahbananaa

Finished Malibu Rising, just started A Thousand Ships


vicmcqueen

What did you think of Malibu Rising? Debating if I should read that one next.


savannnahbananaa

I liked it! I loved the flashback story woven in throughout the book. I’m a fan of Taylor Jenkins Reid so I recommend this one


Joinedformyhubs

It is so good! I really enjoy Greek mythology, so reading from female perspective is great.


dropbear123

All reviews I’ve copied off my Goodreads 54) **Wounded: From Battlefield to Blighty 1914-1918, by Emily Mayhew**. 2.5/5. Giving it a 3 stars as 2 would be a bit harsh. Disappointing. Each of the various types of people involved in the British medical process on the Western Front (so stretcher bearers, nurses, chaplains, surgeons etc) all the way to arrival of the wounded back in Britain. It mainly relies on memoirs and it basically feels like a lot of short individual stories rather a history book. The writing is almost like something out of a fiction book. There isn’t much in the way of analysis or statistics or anything like that (but the author claims this is due to a lack of them as no one in the 20s saw a reason to keep them). Overall I don’t think I’ve gotten much out of this book. The book has its moments but overall not for me due to the storylike style. Decent endnotes for further reading examples though and pretty high quality pictures. (55) **1916: A Global History, by Keith Jeffery** 3.75/5 Overall pretty good. Picks one event from each month of 1916 and then uses it to go into more detail on the wider context of that event for the war. But this means there isn’t much detail on the event in question. The chapter on Jutland for example is actually very brief on the Battle of Jutland and has far more on blockade warfare (which I find more interesting anyway). The chapters that cover areas outside of the Western Front (Africa, the Balkans, Asia) were the highlights for me. I’m not that interested in US history but that chapter was also decent, especially the parts about German sabotage actions there including bombings of ships and munitions stores. I also like that most chapters end with a bit about the memorialisation and memory of that topic. The Western Front chapters were a bit weaker imo but there are so many other books on the subject that I’m not going to criticise this book too harshly for that. The writing is fairly enjoyable and there is also some historiographical discussion. (56) Just finished **Setting the East Ablaze: On Secret Service in Bolshevik Asia by Peter Hopkirk** 4.5/5 rounding up A short (240 pages)and very enjoyable book. It is about Soviet and British agents and espionage in Central Asia. The bulk of the book is based around Tashkent and modern day Uzbekistan in the Russian Civil War era (1918-21). There was a brief but very interesting interlude about Mongolia and the mad baron Ungern-Sternberg who was a brutal Buddhist anti-Bolshevik who thought he was the reincarnation of Genghis Khan. As the book progresses it becomes more about Soviet anti-British activities in India and in particular the actions of the Indian revolutionary M N Roy. The book then ends with a bit about 30s western China and a young Muslim-Chinese warlord. The book is told in a story like adventure sort of way, it isn’t academic and the author doesn’t deny that. [I’ve just realised I criticised the wounded book for being too story like, I think the difference is that in this book the story feels more connected rather than a bunch of separate stories]. It is mainly from the British perspective. The writing is very good. Haven’t decided what to read next but it will probably be **Blood and Iron: The Rise and Fall of the German Empire 1871-1918, by Katja Hoyer**


steelcitygator

I've also got Blood & Iron on the tbr list. Know so much about the post-1900 German military but not nearly enough between then and unification.


Bikinigirlout

I started **Some Girls Do by Jennifer Dugan** Any fans of Atypical/Cazzie should read this. It’s basically Cazzie. It’s also a very easy read. I also started **Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell** **Perfect on Paper by Sophie Gonzalez**


silenttardis

I am reading {{another place to die by Sam north}}


gingerlover08

I’m planning out a few books with similar themes. I’m sure I’ll need some fluffy romances in between the heavy reads. {{ The Secret History }} {{ If We We’re Villains }} {{ The Maidens }} {{ This Savage Song }}


defnotsarah

Last week I read **A Brief History of Time** by Stephen Hawking and **Turtles All The Way Down** by John Green. I’m now halfway through **Smoke Gets In Your Eyes** by Caitlyn Doughty (book 30 for the year). On deck are **The Sparrow** by Mary Doria Russell, **The Peculiar Sadness of Lemon Cake** by Aimee Bender, **The First Bad Man** by Miranda July, and **On Earth We Are Briefly Gorgeous** by Ocean Vuong. I only read one book at a time, so these will take me awhile. I am proud of myself and grateful for this sub because before last fall, I hadn’t read much in a decade. Now I’m having a great time.


ApartmentAlarming101

Finished: Empire of Pain Currently Reading: Killers of the Flower Moon


Columbus_Social

Ia Empire of Pain as amazing/horrific/intense/must-read as everyone is saying?


menacaro

Great ideas of science - Asimov, The portrait of Dorian Gray and The invisible life of Addie Larue!


TheTwoFourThree

Finished **The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York** by Deborah Blum and **How to Land a Plane** by Mark Vanhoenacker. Continuing **Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies** by Jared Diamond and **Null States** by Malka Older. Started **European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman** by Theodora Goss.


VS377

How was The Poisoner’s Handbook?? Seems it has mixed reviews.


TheTwoFourThree

I enjoyed it. It really brought how literally toxic that era was. If you ever time travel back to the late 19th - early 20th century do not eat the food.


Parzival182

Hi friends, hope you’re all well! I finished two books this week, both of which were great. I’m not sure what I’ll read next but I’m going to a baseball game with my dad later so I won’t be able to read until tonight. The first was a continuation of my Discworld release order reread, **Small Gods** by Terry Pratchett. This is such a good entry to the series, and definitely worth the read for anyone because it’s very much a standalone. The second was a fantastic new release, **Reborn in the USA** by Roger Bennett. It was a memoir by one of my favorite soccer podcasters about his childhood of growing up in Liverpool and wanting to move to the USA.


BelleFan2013Grad

Finished the Ice Palace. Starting The Midnight Library by Matt Haig.


Faust_of_the_Void

I finished **"Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald" (Stories from the Vienna Forest)** by Ödön von Horváth. It was good, though the ending is a bit too sad for me, personally. Currently I'm reading **"Tintenherz" (Inkheart)** by Cornelia Funke, still, which is a big nostalgia trip so far. I'm also reading **"Die Waffen nieder" (Lay down your arms)** by Bertha von Suttner. It's very well written and interesting so far and I'm enjoying it a lot. It's one of the more famous pieces of pacifist/anti-war literature out there and I can already see why. Not sure what I'll read after those, though I'll probably reread the other books in the Inkheart series.


jojo2294

I am finishing up **Project Hail Mary**. Hopefully be done today or tomorrow. Next up is **The Silent Patient**.


Jithran

What do you think about it? I really enjoyed his books.


jojo2294

This is my first book I've read by him. I very much have enjoyed it. I'm almost done with it. Got sick this week so haven't read the last couple days.


Joinedformyhubs

Ohhhhhh!! Project hail mary!! If you wanna chat I'm your girl.


hernandezl1

Finished: Ovid’s Metamorphoses Currently reading: White Fragility and Grimm’s Fairy and Folktales


historicalharmony

I'm still reading through **The Chronicles of Elantra** by Michelle Sagara and vastly enjoying myself. I have some critiques of the series but the way these books lead one into the other has really made this series hard to put down regardless. I'm currently on book 13 and I think there's a good chance I'll finish the series by this time next week! What will I read then? 😱


G30N30

Hello all! This week flew by me. I was lucky enough to squeak out one fantastic book. **One Last Stop** by Casey Mcquiston (4/5) A sci-fi, time warp, lesbian romp set on the subway in New York..sounds weird enough & it worked! It is more a story about loving unconditionally & learning to trust oneself no matter obstacles behind or before you. Finding a family of misfits and fitting in. Oh and it was steamy at times ...so so steamy. But the characters are all full of life & I found myself wanting to know more about each and everyone of them. Also, time is weird & I have had many discussions about how time may not be linear in the way we have always been taught...something to think about at least. For the first time this year I have NO CLUE what to read next..I have a lengthy back log of books on my Kindle..like so many..but nothing is calling out to me. 📚 📖 Happy Reading 📚 📖


Columbus_Social

I just finished OLS on Friday. I gave it a 3/5 - I liked it! But it was equal parts boring and fun to me. Definitely enjoyed the steamy parts, and Nikko was my favorite character for sure.


G30N30

I loved Nikko..I wish there was more Annie Depressant!! Lol!


Columbus_Social

Agreed! Looooved her/his character!


Smellynerfherder

Still ploughing on with Dan Simmons' *The Terror*. It's good, but I wonder if I need a little palate cleanser before I make the final push....?


surrfant

I finished some really great reads this week: 63) **Persepolis** by Marjane Sartrapi (4/5) 64) **Fugitive Telemetry** by Martha Wells (4/5) New Murderbot; fantastic as always. 65) **The Water Knife** by Paolo Bacigalupi (4/5) I couldn't remember adding this to my to-read but worth picking it up and going in almost blind. Dystopia which is so close to real life seems to be my thing. 66) **My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises** by Fredrik Backman (4/5) I finished this not 10 minutes ago and am in full book hangover right now, after spending the last 24 hours with these characters. After pushing through a slowish beginning I finished the last 250-300 pages in one sitting. Currently (still) reading: **The Murders in the Rue Morgue and other tales** by Poe. The stories are short but dense, and it's hard to remind myself that these tales are among the first of their kind, only familiar because of modern references. Borges' **The Book Of Imaginary Beings**


Joinedformyhubs

What gives you a book hangover for Murders in the Rue Morgue?


surrfant

Assuming you mean that sense of familiarity, some examples. Spoiler free mostly but I'll not name the stories to try not to give anything away The detective character who sees things others missed (the titular story being one of the first of these kinds of tales). The literal closing-in walls and ceilings. The swinging bladed pendulum. The deadly whirlpool. The going mad through guilt; imagining that everyone else can tell you're hiding something.


Synnov_e

A book hangover or a déjà-book?


GeminiPenguin

It's been a busy few weeks for me. Hope everyone is doing well! I finally feel like my reading is recovering from the slump that was June 2021. This week I finished: **Lost in the Never Woods by** Aiden Thomas: This book vastly disappointed me. I read Cemetery Boys last month and LOVED IT! It was probably one of my top 5 so far this year. I was excited to dig into another one by the same author but it just fell flat and wasn't the good retelling it was hyped up to be. **Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold** by Stephen Fry: This was another one that fell flat for me. After having so much Greek/Roman mythology shoved down my throat at school I've never been fond of it. I like other pantheons, but not them. I really enjoyed **Circe** and am planning to read **Song of Achilles** soon so I thought I'd give Greek mythology another chance. Should've not and skipped this one. **Flowers for Algernon** by Daniel Keyes: This one was a buddy read with u/espiller1. I'm always hesitant for anything labeled scifi at all and this one was nothing like what I was expecting. It was character driven and for an older book really interesting. **The Glass Magician** by Charlie N. Holmberg: This is the second in the series and held up good as a sequel. I've currently moved onto the third book - which seems to be the end of this character's story and I'm hoping the writer tied up all the loose ends.


Columbus_Social

Almost DNF'ed Lost in the Never Woods so many times.


GeminiPenguin

It was a struggle to finish.


Columbus_Social

I honestly ended up skimming the last like 75 pages.


Joinedformyhubs

Yes to Song of Achilles!!!!! How was Circe? It is sitting on the shelf in my bedroom.


uglybutterfly025

Not OP but I personally found Circe to be boring and DNF-ed it but I enjoyed Song of Achilles


GeminiPenguin

It was a 5 star read for me last year. I don’t generally like Greek myths but she brought them to life in a way that made for a really good tale.


Joinedformyhubs

It is a wonderful way to tell the myths. In a dramatic setting. When reading the myths it seems like a text book at times.


ambrym

I felt the same way about Lost in the Never Woods. Had really high expectations after reading Cemetery Boys but Never Woods was a big flop. I kept waiting for the story to really get going and it never did


historicalharmony

I've been so afraid to read Lost in the Never Woods for that reason! I'm not a huge retellings/Peter Pan fan but I loved Cemetery Boys. Now I'm wondering if maybe I should just wait for his next book...


GeminiPenguin

I would recommend skipping it if you’re on the fence. In some ways, it read like it was by a whole different person. The only tie to his style was ultimately both dealt with some form of the afterlife.


historicalharmony

I've read that he wrote Lost in the Never Woods first but when he delivered Cemetery Boys to his editor they wanted to release that one first. I can see why...


GeminiPenguin

That makes sense! Never woods read like a first book and I thought it was his first until I checked publication dates. Thanks for clearing that up for me.


darkLordSantaClaus

July 7th I finished **Hyperion, by Dan Simmons** This book was great. Totally recommend.


regi-ginge

I usually hit a reading slump at around this time of year, this year is no different. I tried to start several different books this week but to no avail. I’m currently about halfway through **The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse** which I’m really enjoying and hoping will get me back into the groove. I read **The Nothing Man** earlier this year and it’s absolutely excellent, enjoy!


Beecakeband

Its past midnight here. I intended to go to sleep after reading just a few more pages of the Nothing Man. I finished it. Cripes what a fantastic read!


Jesnig

This week I finished two books. Meet Me In Another Life by Catriona Silvey which was amazing- exploring the depth and complexity in human relationships. Very much recommend if you enjoy thoughtful speculative fiction. I also finished Unseen Academicals by Terry Pratchett - while not my favourite Pratchett, it’s still great. I read because it’s thematically relevant with the final of the Euros taking place today. I am (still!) listening to The Mirror and the Light by Hilary Mantel - I’m about 8 hours left so determined to try and finish this week. It’s a slightly more ponderous book compared the others in the Wolf Hall trilogy. I’m also about 100 pages into Leviathan Wakes by James S A Corey - love the expanse series and it’s a thrill to pick them up again. Reading them in order is my summer project.


emkay99

Like all novelists who make a name for themselves and win awards, Ian McEwan was once a beginner trying to get noticed. His first, rather brief novel, **[The Cement Garden](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9957.The_Cement_Garden?from_search=true&from_srp=true&qid=HmwW0J9SlI&rank=1)**. published in 1978, certainly helped him do that. Jack, the fourteen-year-old narrator, lives with his parents, his two sisters, Julie and Sue (one older, one younger), and their much younger brother, Tom. Jack is slogging through adolescence and has a thing for Julie, who rather leads him on. And both of them abuse Sue, though she certainly doesn’t mind. Their demanding Dad, who has had one heart attack already and is unemployed, finally collapses while over-exerting himself. He never comes back from the hospital, which leaves their Mum trying to cope with four kids. But then Mum gets sick, too, and takes to her bed. Julie tries to take over running what’s left of the family, but she’s not very good at it. And then, suddenly, the kids are left alone with a body in the bed upstairs. If they report Mum’s death, there’s no telling what the authorities will do with them, right? So they have to take care of this problem on their own. They have to keep this second death a secret. They have to bury Mum themselves. This is the sort of novel that you can’t stop reading, even while you wince and think to yourself “Christ! What are they *doing*?” You can’t really call the kids dysfunctional, since they’ve been abandoned by circumstances. Of course, they make bad decisions and do an absolutely terrible job of looking after themselves -- because they’re kids. And since the story ends rather abruptly with the end of their corrupt little Eden, you don’t know what happens to them after. Frustrating, but a good narrative decision on the author’s part. What this book mostly accomplishes is to display McEwan’s potential as an innovative writer. You can’t call it a pleasant book or a fun read, but the images and conversations will certainly stick in your mind. In my opinion, William Gibson has never written a bad book -- but even so, when it was published in 2003 (it's a re-read for me), **[Pattern Recognition](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22320.Pattern_Recognition?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=poSqghxgS4&rank=1)** was his best work in a long time. He sets his story in the present this time instead of the near future, but the feel of it is much the same. Which, I suppose is part of the point he wants to make; the future is now. Cayce Pollard is a thirty-something freelance marketing consultant with an unusual specialty: By applying her “allergy” to trademarks, she can predict very accurately whether corporate logos and branding will be successful in the marketplace. (Tommy Hilfiger and the Michelin Man are especially toxic.) She’s also a “footagehead,” one of an international group of avid afficionados who study and endlessly analyze a series of short and highly affecting video clips discovered on the Internet. The two come together when the head of an important London ad agency (with his own agenda, naturally) hires her to uncover the creators of the footage. The third major thread in her life is contemplating the disappearance of her father, a retired CIA-connected security specialist in New York on the morning of September 11th. All these themes and plots weave themselves together in intriguing ways, and in Gibson’s unique narrative style. But, aside from the story itself, much of the enjoyment one gets from Gibson’s books is a result of his skill at description and simile, all of it highly quotable. Adrian Goldsworthy is an expert in Roman military matters with several previous works to his credit, and even though he’s an academic, his style is exceptionally readable without being oversimplified or talking down to the reader -- probably because he has also turned out to be a pretty decent historical novelist. In **[The Complete Roman Army](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/60437.The_Complete_Roman_Army?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=poMEglZ785&rank=1)**, e begins with the origins of the citizen army under the early Republic, made up of soldiers who volunteered as a matter of patriotism. This worked fine for several centuries, when Rome’s sphere of influence was still relatively small and campaigns were limited in time. As conquests expanded, though, and continuous occupation of conquered terrritories became necessary, a full-time professional army was needed, made up of career soldiers receiving pay. The ethnic make-up of the army also shifted, with a large percentage of non-Italians being accepted -- though they were still citizens, as the law required -- and with a much greater proportion of non-citizen auxiliaries added to the TO. Sections of the book cover the many aspects of a soldier’s life, both on garrison duty (which might be most of the time) and at war. Great attention is given to weapons and equipment, and the author is careful to note the many competing theories based on scarce evidence. The nearly 250 illustrations even include photos of modern reenactors, whose experiments and field trials have answered many scholarly questions. A lovely book, well written and edited, and very useful as a bridge between casual interest and academic study. **[Sunny Rolls the Dice](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43319654-sunny-rolls-the-dice)** is the third in a series of semi-autobiographical graphic novels by brother-sister team Jennifer and Matthew Holm about the adolescence of Sunny Lewin of suburban Pennsylvania. It’s the late ’70s and Sunny is about the age of my own kids then, so I remember that period well. She’s in 7th Grade now and things are changing in her life and the lives of her friends -- more so in the latter, though. Her best friend decrees that they’re too old now to go trick-or-treating (Sunny loves making the costumes), and that wearing galoshes to school when it rains is “babyish,” and she’s suddenly much more interested in what the boys think of her. Sunny, on the other hand, flunks the “”Are You a Groovy Teen?” quiz in a magazine and gets totally caught up in playing D&D with the guys in the neighborhood. (I played nearly every weekend for all of that decade, too, even though I have twenty years on Sunny.) The story follows her through the year as she begins trying to figure out who she is, and who she might want to be, and the obvious-seeming realistic artwork will sneak up on with its subtlety. I’m sure today’s middle-schooler would consider portable cassette-players (that only weighed ten pounds) to be Neolithic, but the questions and issues the authors address are universal and eternal. If you like Reina Telgemeir -- and who doesn’t? -- you’ll enjoy Sunny’s adventures in discovering life.


espiller1

FINISHED: • People We Meet on Vacation by Emily Henry (4 stars) Poppy and Alex have been vacation buddies and best friends for years until one summer, two years ago, when everything fell apart. • Capsule by Mel Torrefranca (3.5 stars) Two students from Brookwood High School mysteriously go missing on the same night and a fellow teenager is challenged by a cellphone app called Capsule to save them. • Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes (5 stars, re- read) through the eyes of the protagonist, a mentally disabled man named Charlie, we see what his life could look like after an experiment gives both him and lab mouse Algernon an intelligence boost.(buddy read with u/GeminiPenguin and caught up with r/RoryGilmoreBookClub 's discussions!) • Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (3 stars?, still debating this one) Noemi's recently married cousin sends a cryptic letter begging for someone to save her from certain doom. • The Lost Apothecary by Sarah Penner (2.5 stars? still deciding on this one too) weaves together two stories; in 1791 Nella is an apothecary owner that makes potions to poison husbands; Caroline has fled to London in present day, after catching her husband cheating. CURRENTLY READING: • Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (1/4 in, with r/bookclub) Ryland Grace is the sole surviving astronaut who must save Earth from Peril though, just one problem, he's suffering from huge memory loss! • 28 Summers by Elin Hildebrand (just over 1/3 in) Mallory and Jake meet every Labour Day weekend for a romantic affair, despite the dramatic lingering effects their romance casts over their lives and relationships. UP NEXT: • The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse • Fable by Adrienne Young • Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller • Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid


Joinedformyhubs

Yay for Song of Achilles.


espiller1

I'm so excited to finally read it!


pbcapcrunch

I’m also reading Mexican Gothic. I think there was so much hype. I also expected more Mexican folklore? It’s alright. Reads like a YA novel inspired by The Yellow Wallpaper. Malibu Rising was so excellent, especially me being an oldest sibling.


espiller1

I agree, totally overhyped. Definitely feels a bit like a YA Yellow Wallpaper/ Rebecca I've heard good things, I'm excited to dig into it!